Casa Seta / Martín Dulanto Architect

  • 16 Mar 2013
  • Houses Selected Works
© Marco Símola

Architects:
Location: , Perú
Architect In Charge: Martín Dulanto Sangalli
Area: 136.12 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Marco Símola

Collaborators: Martha Leiva, Raúl Montesinos, Juan Caycho, Paola Hagei, Pierina Sánchez, Sergio Salazar
Structural Engineer: Jorge Avendaño
Lightning: Solange Ávila
Landscape Design: Marisa Larrain
Construction: TALLER 33

© Marco Símola

This project is part of a personal exploration where different 2blocks” and the void generated between them are the main protagonists. The house was conceived as a large white box which was excavated to generate habitable spaces within. It.

© Marco Símola

The social area locate on the first level is one large space that completely integrates its diverse uses (living/dining/kitchen/terrace) and also integrates itself with the exterior thanks to the collision between the exterior gardens and a corner of the social area. This corner is column-free because it has a cantilevered structure.

© Marco Símola

The bedrooms are also located on the first level; the area where they are located has the ability to become independent and separate of the social area  by closing a sliding door. the service area is also located on the same level.

© Marco Símola

The terrace level is purely social: living, dining, BBQ, bar, pool and resting areas. The materials chosen have a rustic quality and vegetation was included in the interior in order to reinforce the relationship between user and nature. The project has the following areas:

© Marco Símola

1. First level: main bedroom with private bathroom, 3 secondary bedrooms with their own private bathrooms, deposits, bar, guest bathroom, dining room, living room, terrace, patio, kitchen, service bedroom, service bathroom, service patio.

© Marco Símola

2. Terrace: living room, dining room, pool, resting area, BBQ area.

First Floor Plan
Cite: "Casa Seta / Martín Dulanto Architect" 16 Mar 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 25 Oct 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=342598>