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Shell.ter Pavilion / LIKE Architects

© Eva Vieira
© Eva Vieira

The Shell.ter pavilion, a temporary installation for the Cerveira Creative Camp, is built from monoblock chairs in the gardens of a natural park in the north of Portugal, during a short summer workshop by LIKE Architects. Resembling the most advanced digital formalizations of parametric design, the pavilion is actually set by the association of arches formed by ordinary chairs, which, rather than serving to seat, serve as shadow and backrest and create new frameworks that enhance the surrounding nature. More images and architects’ description after the break.

When the sun is strong, the shadow projected on the structure itself emphasizes the tracery of the pavilion, creating effects of great complexity. The association of chairs in the mirror and also its rotation in the horizontal plane disadvantage the reading of the chair while an isolated element, contributing to the creation of an unknown and unusual white plastic skeleton that arouses curiosity in all visitors.

© João Marques
© João Marques

Configuring a pergola tunnel, Shell.ter invites park guests to relax in the shade along the river, creating a new meeting place that has even received small concerts. Being fully reversible, Shell.ter has a virtually zero environmental impact, and can also be (re) assembled every summer. Architects: LIKE Architects Location: Parque de Lazer do Castelinho, Vila Nova de Cerveira, Portugal Team: Diogo Aguiar, Teresa Otto, João Jesus Construction: LIKE Architects with the students from Cerveira Creative Camp Client: Canal 180 | Câmara Municipal de Vila Nova de Cerveira Principal Use: Summer Pavilion Principal Materials: 84 monoblock chairs Dimensions: 5.70m x 4m x 2.75m Installation Height: 2.75 m Curatorship: Canal 180 Construction Date: June 2012

© João Marques
© João Marques
Cite:Alison Furuto. "Shell.ter Pavilion / LIKE Architects" 23 Nov 2012. ArchDaily. Accesed . <http://www.archdaily.com/295069/shell-ter-pavilion-like-architects/>