Orange Office / Sander Architects

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Architects: Sander Architects
Location: Venice, , USA
Constructed Area: 672 sqm
Project year: 2009
Photographs:

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The Orange Office is an architecturally distinctive landmark on Lincoln Blvd that will be immediately identifiable by its orange exterior.

Orange fiber grate provides a screen over translucent acrylic to diminish heat gain. At night the building will glow thanks to the acrylic panels under the orange grating – and during the day the translucent acrylic will allow a soft diffuse light for plenty of natural daylighting.

The “green roof” of the building will have a ring of tall grasses to wave in the ocean breezes: an idyllic garden that provides a lush green getaway high above the rush of traffic.

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The office provides an eco-friendly work environment:

  • Orange fiber-grate screen diminishes heat gain
  • Multi-cell acrylic paneled exterior provides excellent natural daylighting
  • Translucent acrylic panels provide excellent natural daylighting
  • Green roof (roof garden)
  • Low-flush toilets
  • Individually adjustable HVAC – up to seven zones per floor
  • Earth-friendly kitchen counters and cabinets
  • Low-VOC paint
  • Low-energy fluorescent lighting
  • Energy-star appliances

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The benefit to designing an architecturally distinctive green office space can be seen in the potential tenants that it attracts. Sander Architects will occupy half of the top floor and we have leased the remaining space +/- 6,000 square feet to epOxyGreen, the largest source in Southern California for green design and construction materials, for the expansion of their business. The plan is to create a Green Design Center that will be a ‘one stop shop’ for eco-friendly construction and design.

Cite: "Orange Office / Sander Architects" 10 Jul 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 23 Aug 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=28233>

21 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Looks like a building wrapped in snow-fencing…

    Also the panels have a very “unfinished” appearance. Like someone is restoring a facade underneath…

  2. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I lived down the street from this building as it was going up. I never really knew whether it was finished or not. The mass under the mesh is bright pink so it is a very unique color as a whole.

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      mrciscous: I think you are giving too much credit to Sander by grouping him with H&dM. This projects lacks the sophistication of the Signal Box skin treatment. but you might be right if you were saying that this project is a sophomoric ripoff/inspiration.

  3. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I agree with arch, it does seem like the facade is being restored. And, from a distance, doesn’t it have a slight resemblance to Enrique Norten’s Habita Hotel in Mexico City?

  4. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    You just can’t wrap a mesh over an structural skeleton and think it would look trendy.

    It will only look like an unifinished building in constant renovation.

    Neat idea, poor execution.

  5. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I’m familiar with this building and drive by it frequently. I just thought it was under-financed and work had stopped, over a year ago. With that said, that is how it looks…like a poor-man’s Morphosis knock-off. The most confusing aspect has to be the cost put into staggering the concrete at each floor. I can’t speak for the inside or roof but the exterior is a failed urban experiment.

    The “green movement” necessarily does no want to make this project the poster-child for their cause.

  6. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    “I’m familiar with this building and drive by it frequently. I just thought it was under-financed and work had stopped, over a year ago. “… Marc has it exactly right! as a designer working in Venice, I drive by this on a regular basis as well, and it does look like the perenially unfinished bldg! Any color but orange would have better!! Orange is so 2005 ;) j/k, but it is the color of construction.
    And, I have to add, too many architects in Venice/LA trying to do interesting things with color and failing MISERABLY.
    Construction admin is essential to ensure everything coordinates through the value engineering exercise…Do you trust your contractor to pick a substitute? For Santa Monica residents, case in point is the new parking structure on 4th and the 10. ick.

  7. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Wonderfully original! I’ve seen plenty of screens, metal mesh and otherwise, but this is certainly a unique take on that conceit. It’ll be a beast to keep the netting and all those nooks clean of soot though.

  8. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I live less than a mile from this monstrosity and every day I drive by I lament the early days of its construction when the basic form seemed to give me hope that a nice piece of modern architecture was in the works. The biggest issue with this building is the abysmal detailing. Nevermind those clumsy vertical concrete walls that the mass above rests on, or the poor placement and routing of utilities in the parking garage….the entry is perhaps the least resolved and considered aspect of the project. I can’t imagine anyone wanting to work in that building. Frosted glass with no clear view to the exterior is inhumane. It’s been ‘almost finished’ for a year now.

    Sorry, it’s just plain bad. I don’t even mind the unfinished look but that orange grid is far too open and does nothing in terms of measurable performance regardless of the claims. The frosted glass, maybe, but not enough.

  9. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    It is a strange and unique building that would attract people easily due to its exterior building material but it looks like the building is still under construction. Thus, sophistication is needed, even though the orange fiber serves a need (diminishing heat gain).

  10. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I’m a little surprised the architect chose to publish this one. He’s a good designer, but this project is not well received in LA from what I’ve heard. Bit of a fumble by an otherwise talented guy.

  11. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I’m hoping that Mr Sander now has the money to finish the project and remove all the terrible cheap signage the tenants put all over the facade. And what’s up with the billboard almost touching the front facade and the stair tower on top. Those seem like mistakes. Is the billboard to be removed once you have the financing? Is the stair tower to be resolved somehow?

    Good luck Mr Sander. You’ve taken a lot of heat on this project locally but I admire you for taking risks and going for it. It’d be good for modern architects in LA if somehow this project pulled it out in the end. It’s gotten a lot of commentary from the general public, and not much of it good news seemingly.

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