Tisse Métis Égal / PLUX.5

  • 15 Oct 2012
  • Selected Works Structures
© Alexandre Guilbeault

Architects: PLUX.5
Location: , Quebec,
Design Team: Étienne Bernier, Olivier Bourgeois, Marianne Charbonneau, Jean-Bruno Morissette and Jean-Philippe Saucier
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Alexandre Guilbeault

Construction: Unisson Structures

As part of the event Métis-sur-Montréal, now in its fourth consecutive year, Château Ramezay and the Reford Gardens present the exhibit Tisse Métis Égal created by the collective PLUX.5. This imposing architectural structure, perched on the grassy pedestal at Place De La Dauversière, offers a surprising new perspective of the city’s urban landscape. A unique look at Old Montréal!

© Alexandre Guilbeault

Erected in the heart of the historical district, this contemporary installation acts as a bright coloured filter that transforms our perception of the surrounding environment. Its walls, perforated with a scatter of triangular patterns—cleverly evocative of traditional weaving, particularly the ornamentation of the arrowhead sash—draw a striking parallel with Québec’s past. Inside, visitors are immersed in a play of shadows and light that shapes their understanding of the work and its surrounding elements. Tisse Métis Égal is a tribute to Québec history, offering a brilliant interpretation of its traditions through a contemporary lens.

© Alexandre Guilbeault

The installation was created to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the opening to the public of the Reford Gardens and the 150th anniversary of the creation of the Antiquarian and Numismatic Society of Montréal (ANSM), the founder of Château Ramezay – Historic Site and Museum of Montréal.
Tisse Métis Égal is presented free of charge at Place De La Dauversière in Montréal until October 13, 2012.

Section

View this project in Google Maps

* Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
Cite: "Tisse Métis Égal / PLUX.5" 15 Oct 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 01 Aug 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=281130>

4 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    so what do you see differently from 10 steps up that you can’t see on the ground? What is this pavilion for?

Share your thoughts