Holly Tree Farm / Cykel Architecture

© Jonathan Wherrett

Architects: Cykel Architecture
Location: , Tasmania, Australia
Architect In Charge: Stephen Geason
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Jonathan Wherrett

Project Area: 140 sqm
Collaborator: Skookom / Richard Loney
Engineer: Hedrick House
Building Surveyor: Hobart Building surveying

The house is located in Castle Forbes Bay in the Huon Valley Southern Tasmania. Designed for a young family whose original farm house on the property burnt down.

© Jonathan Wherrett

The home was completed early 2012. The client delivered a rich and diverse brief. The site stunning and varied, To the south are forested hills, to the north cherry orchids and to the east the Huon river. The clients Jared and Sara are both working professionals and run various animals on the property.

© Jonathan Wherrett

The home was designed to accommodate a growing, busy young family and their pets. The home is nestled amongst existing rural buildings. Form and materials are both informed by the vernacular which surrounds the property. Materials from the old farmhouse have been included in the new home. The bricks in the passage is1 distinct example.

© Jonathan Wherrett

Solar gain, natural light, views, protection from prevailing winds, pedestrian & vehicle access and build ability with reduced site disturbance also informed the design intent.

© Jonathan Wherrett

The house is passive solar, with large box windows for sitting, reading etc. Internally the floor is a concrete slab with hydronic floor heating, the slab is finished with a dark tinted Livos oil.

© Jonathan Wherrett

External materials consist of concrete block, shadow clad smooth plywood with a paint finish and vertical Macrocarpa boards oil finish. Windows are aluminium frame thermal break powder coat finish with double glazed units.

© Jonathan Wherrett

All ply wood interior lining is FSC and finished with locally fabricated oils, the passage way boxes with a tint of lime.

Plans
Cite: "Holly Tree Farm / Cykel Architecture" 17 Sep 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 21 Oct 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=272352>