Films & Architecture: “Baraka”

Baraka is the word for “blessing” in many Arabic languages. It entitled the work of Ron Fricke who did the cinematographic work for the previous posted film Koyaanisqatsi by . This time, he only includes some music and leave the rest of the job to the compilation of impressive shots that capture nature and civilisation in progress.

Let us know your thoughts about this never ending contrasts between artificial/natural, and ancient/contemporary environments.

MAIN INFO

Original title: Baraka
Year: 1992
Runtime: 96 min.
Country: United States
Director: Ron Fricke
Writer: Constantine Nicholas, Genevieve Nicholas
Soundtrack: Lisa Gerrard, Brendan Perry, Michael Stearns ()

PLOT

Baraka has no plot, no storyline, no actors, no dialogue nor any voice-over. Instead, the film uses themes to present new steps and evoke emotion through pure cinema. Baraka is a kaleidoscopic, global compilation of both natural events and by fate, life and activities of humanity on Earth. Baraka’s subject matter has some similarities to Koyaanisqatsi—including footage of various landscapes, churches, ruins, religious ceremonies, and cities thrumming with life, filmed using time-lapse photography in order to capture the great pulse of humanity as it flocks and swarms in daily activity.

The film features a number of long tracking shots through various settings, including Auschwitz and Tuol Sleng: over photos of the people involved, past skulls stacked in a room, to a spread of bones. Like Koyaanisqatsi, Baraka compares natural and technological phenomena. It also seeks a universal cultural perspective: a shot of an elaborate tattoo on a bathing Japanese yakuza precedes a view of tribal paint.

TRAILER

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Previously posted on this section…

Cite: Portilla, Daniel. "Films & Architecture: “Baraka”" 04 Sep 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 21 Aug 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=269357>

2 comments

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    FYI, Fricke has a similar new film out now (in NY) called Samsara. In terms of architecture, it notably features Dubai.

  2. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    The most stunning cinematic work I can think of. You owe it to yourself to watch this! No words, but it says so much.

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