Infographic: Women in Architecture

Embed this Infographic, just copy/paste this code:

Cite: Jett, Megan. "Infographic: Women in Architecture" 14 Mar 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 20 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=216844>

30 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down +3

    It appears that the Bio of Julia Morgan was mixed with the Bio of Marion Griffin. It was Morgan who was the first female to be admitted to the Ecole de Beaux Arts and subsequently designed Hearst Castle in California.

    Someone correct me if I am wrong here.

    • Thumb up Thumb down 0

      I agree – I looks like two bios are mashed together under one name. Morgan was at Berkeley and Ecole de Beaux Arts.

  2. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    I know she wasn’t an architect, but I think Jane Jacobs should have her name somewhere on this graphic as well.

  3. Thumb up Thumb down +5

    Another error is that it says Beverly Willis and Susan Maxman were both the first female president of the AIA in different years.

  4. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    Dustin, I think you’re right, looks like AD or the Arch’s Journal might have repaired it.

    This infographic is very US-centric and the list at the bottom is mostly UK, perhaps they used different sources.

  5. Thumb up Thumb down +10

    Whenever I think of architects or architecture, I never care whether is a “he” or a “she”. Don’t you realize you are making separate containers between male and female architects with this article? It would be more apropriate if you write an article about ages but not on gender. We’re trying to build a world of human beings, not a woman and men world…

    • Thumb up Thumb down +5

      Luis: I don´t think that this will make you look at architecture with a gender biase. It simply informs architects about the achivements of women in architecture, which is not a bad thing since the information about it it so scarce. When the conditions between female and male architects are equal, this separation won´t be necessary.

      • Thumb up Thumb down +1

        You are just backing up what Luis is talking about:
        “when the conditions between female and male architects are equal, this separation won’t be necessary.”

        This is a separation that, in many cases, isn’t necessary now. Of course it’s not universal – nothing is. Good designers/good architecture aren’t concerned with the gender of its author.

        You should conduct this study with ANY other profession as well. You’ll find that there are always females who feel this way and always females who view being a woman as a great advantage – not a disadvantage like this article does.

      • Thumb up Thumb down +2

        Luis, and Kyle… you’re not getting what Ana is trying to say… I think this infographic was made so we could celebrate and KNOW the achievements of women in Architecture in this and the last century… it’s not that we are separating ourselves… here in Mexico, 60% of the student body of Arch School are girls…

        I’m an architect and I know a lot of female architects, most of them have had to put their careers aside to have a family… it’s just nice to know that there have been women succesful enough to do both.

    • Thumb up Thumb down 0

      Absolutely agree Luis. There are so many instances of the male and female divide in society, when in fact discussion should centre around people and age. Some years ago in the UK in higher education, there was a movement to appoint more senior female staff in order to redress the male dominance. I thought that this was aborrent and belittled the status of women. People should be appointed on merit not on gender.

      • Thumb up Thumb down 0

        Sultony: People should be appointed on merit not on gender.

        The point is that they never have been in the past, so affirmative action (if a m. & a f. candidate are equally qualified, the f. should get the position) is required to redress the balance. There’s nothing “belittling” to women in this view.

        Sultony: Good designers/good architecture aren’t concerned with the gender of its author.

        Maybe not. However, that’s irrelevant to the issue, which is getting a roughly equal number of women and men in positions of power within the profession. Until there is no longer a majority of men judging the advancement of women, affirmative action will be necessary.

    • Thumb up Thumb down -1

      Ah, Luis…. it is a male luxury to think gender doesn’t matter. Just like it’s a white luxury to think race doesn’t matter.

  6. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    I think the statistics at the beginning of this article are far more poignant. For me it’s not about seeing it as an obstacle but about recognising the context.

  7. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    I’d appreciate you clarify it’s “Women in the architecture but IN THE U.S.” (specially considering it’s infography). There’s a mixture of global and local statistics that don’t reflect what is happening with women in this field worldwide.

  8. Thumb up Thumb down +2

    I’d appreciate you clarify it’s “Women in the architecture but IN THE U.S.” (specially considering it’s infography). There’s a mixture of global and local statistics that don’t reflect what is happening with women in this field worldwide.

  9. Thumb up Thumb down +2

    If one considers the construction industry as the peacetime equivalent of the military, which I believe it is, the women in architecture can be seen differently. Construction is about supply chains, subcontractor relationships, time is money issues, and all kinds of messy field work. In reality all architects are women this scenario- we are the brains without the brawn. We most socialize and schmooze with clients and public bodies. Just that females are moreso. As the western world becomes more feminized, more women are “conquering” this field. Just think of them as military heroes in an artistic/scientific field.

  10. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    21/03/2012 Corrections have been made for the entries of Beverly Willis, Julia Morgan and Marion Griffin.

  11. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    Megan, Just curious why this Infographic didn’t mention the establishment of the “Women In Architecture” Committees of the American Institute of Architects, in the history part. Aren’t the establishment of those committees significant milestones in the history of the largest architects organization in the US?

    • Thumb up Thumb down 0

      There were also very strong Women in Architecture committees in Boston and LA. In Chicago please don’t just highlight Jeanne Gang, Carol Ross Barney has built a longer and more awarded practice and was a founder of the CWA. If it weren’t for the local committees young women would continue to feel isolated in the world of starchitects.

  12. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I think it should be added to that infographic table Tatiana Bilbao’s recently Berlin Arts Prize, probably the most important architecture award in Germany and one of the most important in Europe, which was given before to some of the male starchitects..

  13. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    You’ve got nothing on your history timeline between 1948 and 1963 – where is Natalie de Blois? For SOM, she designed the beautiful and influential Pepsi-Cola HQ building at 500 Park Avenue, constructed 1958-60.

  14. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    Heh ! We live in a city in west of Iran ( as ” they ” like to make it an Islamist country ! ) , and among the architecture students of our university , more than 90% are girls !
    The goverment decided to make the students 50-50 as a ” must ” , so this year we have a meaningful distance between the half of the students ( girls ) and the other half !

  15. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    So, as it seems, it’s a myth that the field of architecture is a field only for men… And in the future, this will continue to go away from the truth…

  16. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Six months after my previous comment, and I see you still aren’t interested in Natalie de Blois’ contribution.

  17. Thumb up Thumb down -1

    Absent from the timeline is Anne Tyng who collaborated with Louis I. Kahn, and was an accomplished architect and educator in her own right. Don’t forget, also,Norma Sklarek, the first black woman to be elected Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1980. In 1985, she became the first African-American female architect to form her own architectural firm: Siegel, Sklarek, Diamond, which was the largest woman-owned and mostly woman-staffed architectural firm in the United States.

Share your thoughts