18 Kowloon East / Aedas

Courtesy of Aedas

Architect: Aedas
Location: Kowloon Bay, ,
Size: 32,400 sq m (GFA)
Status: Completion 2010

Aedas shared with us their design for a 28-storey mixed-use building which includes housing, offices, retail spaces and a car park. A design with efficient office floor plates and a rational box were requested by the client. With the building located in a community with dense industrial blocks, instead of providing another office tower entirely wrapped in a coolly glazed skin, the design investigates the possibility of providing an environmentally sustainable design in such an industrial area. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Courtesy of Aedas

Kowloon Bay, once dependent on manufacturing, is undergoing transformation of rejuvenation. The target is to contribute a greening effect to the neighborhood and enhance the quality of life for users in the building as well as the pedestrians on the street level.

Courtesy of Aedas

With ‘green’ as the theme, the final design introduces extensive planting at the car park floors located at the lower portion of the tower. In addition to the visually greening effect to the neighborhood, the planting also filters the air and improves the air quality within the car park. Hopefully, the suspended particulates in the air can be reduced and the design is able to provide car park users a more pleasant experience.

Cite: "18 Kowloon East / Aedas" 05 Nov 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed 20 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=181332>

6 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down -2

    I think it looks EXACTLY like “another office tower entirely wrapped in a coolly glazed skin” — only stuck on top of a slightly more appealing parking structure than usual… are there any real sustainability aspects to this, or merely a quick, pretty green-wash?

  2. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Truly it is a pretty, dynamic elevations with greenery, we need more green on our street. But to me the green here is merely a building ornament, it seems not functioning as a sustainable item, i.e. thermal issues

  3. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    loads of nice images with distorted perspectives, can architecture be more than that?
    though it’s a nice attempt on something new in hong kong, inhabitants or end users and pedestrians, should be treated as equal. why is there not even one photo taken from inside?

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