El Secreto House / Pascal Arquitectos

© Courtesy of Pascal Arquitectos

Architects: Pascal Arquitectos
Location: City,
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 624.42 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of Pascal Arquitectos

The house has two levels, a ground floor and a first floor with an additional garage, courtyard with reflecting pool, and a garden area. The ground Floor includes a covered entrance hall, an inner hall, a double height library, two guest bathrooms, a double height Interior Patio, a living room with fireplace, dining room, breakfast area, and kitchen with Pantry and utility room.

Ground Floor Plan

The upper level includes a lobby, TV Room, Master Bedroom with bathroom and dressing room, gym, two secondary bedrooms with bathroom and dressing room in each, and an outdoor terrace garden. Also on this level, there is a guest bedroom and bathroom that is separated from the rest of the bedrooms.

© Courtesy of Pascal Arquitectos

As part of the architectonic discourse and for reasons of durability and maintenance very few finishings were used, one being , one of the house’s most notable materials for its durability over time and the fact that it acquires more dignity and history with time. The house was build with structure-based construction of  with rebar, apparent  walls, red brick and use of structural steel elements. The exterior wall finishes and some interior finishes are Galarza stone while cast with vinyl and enamel paints are used in wet areas.

© Courtesy of Pascal Arquitectos

One of the main objectives was to achieve the most natural light and views to the garden, and not to create a series of closed rooms but a series of spaces where the events happen and communicate with one another. It is important to note that the entire house is designed in modules and multiples of feet, generating different sizes of overlapping rectangles, which became the geometric pattern of the house.

© Courtesy of Pascal Arquitectos
Cite: "El Secreto House / Pascal Arquitectos" 04 Jun 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed 29 Nov 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=139491>