All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Princeton Architectural Press

Princeton Architectural Press: The Latest Architecture and News

Call for Entries: Pamphlet Architecture 36

In a world of climate change, refugees, and displaced peoples in crisis, Pamphlet Architecture asks for visions on the concept of BUOYANCY AND LIFT (FLOATING CITIES). Proposed solutions will provide housing, clinics, and other community services to 1,500 - 2,000 inhabitants with incremental additions while incorporating innovative technologies.

Pamphlet Architecture 32 Call for Entries

By addressing the capacity to cope, the ability to bounce back, and the mitigation and management of risk, proposals are welcome that showcase a fresh understanding of the possibilities and opportunities of resilience in architecture, from the large to the small scale. Whether resilience stems from natural disaster, civil conflict, global warming, catastrophe, and so on, is the applicant’s discretion. Please visit the submission site for more details.

Call for Entries: The Architectural League Prize for Young Architects + Designers

Young architects and designers are invited to submit work to the annual Architectural League Prize Competition. Projects of all types, either theoretical or real and executed in any medium, are welcome. The jury will select work for presentation in public programs, an on-line installation, podcasts, and an exhibition in late spring 2010. W

Digital Fabrications: Architectural and Material Techniques / Lisa Iwamoto

“Architecture continually informs and is informed by its modes of representation and construction, perhaps never more so than now, when digital media and emerging technologies are rapidly expanding what we conceive to be formally, spatially, and materially possible”

- Lisa Iwamoto

During 2009 I had the chance to visit Iwamoto Scott in San Francisco, a practice lead by Lisa Iwamoto and Craig Scott. At their office I could see first hand the study models for some of the projects the firm has been involved, such as a mockup for their P.S.1 proposal, Coral Reef, or the lightweight wooden pieces that structure the massive Voussoir Cloud installation at SCI Arc. These small pieces had a lot to tell, not only about the specific project they were part of, but also their iterations.

The firm has a recognized expertise in digital fabrication, presented by Lisa Iwamoto at the AIA Convention 2009 during the Emerging Voices forum, and also on her book “Digital Fabrication” edited by Princeton Architectural Press under their Architecture Brief series.

The book presents in a clear way (with very good examples) the methods behind digital fabrication: sectioning, tessellating, folding, contouring, and forming. For most of us these words are pretty much obvious and we often use them as design principles of our projects. But to get the full scope of what they really mean, or for those that want to start understanding -and using- them, this is a recommended reading.

Expanded Practice: Höweler + Yoon Architecture / MY Studio

The title “Expanded Practice” comes from how Höweler + Yoon Architecture / My Studio have named their design methodology. And in this book it’s not just a title, as the book is really a guide on how this young firm conceives their projects rather than a mere catalog of works.

Their works can’t be grouped in types of buildings, instead their works are grouped in envelopes, natures, formats, interactions and media, as they range from a Möbius strip dress, to a responsive park.

What caught me while reading this book is the effective use of technology developed by this practice, not just mere eye candy as we are used to. It clearly shows how the architects’ experimentation with small electronic components could be derived into interactive spaces through a methodological work. And I have to repeat “metholodogy” as it is the most important part of this book, which makes it a learning tool instead of a construction catalog as we are used to on typical monographs.

More information about this book after the break.

The Miller Hull Partnership, Public Works

I had to say that I wasn’t aware of the work by the Miller Hull Partnership, a Seattle based firm established in 1977, until we received this book from Princeton Architectural Press.

The book, a sequel to the 2001 monograph by the same publishing house, shows a selection of recent projects in a good format, with clear drawings and good photos.

The projects cover both residential and public works, such as the Willamette River Water Treatment Plant a wonderful project, which doubles as a park with picnic areas. The rest of the works of the firm have a clear signature when it comes to materials and structural solutions, with transparency as something in common.

I recommend this book for both its clear presentation and the quality of the works by the firm.

More information about this book after the break.