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Levitation: The Latest Architecture and News

Georges Kachaamy's Rising Oases Float in the Air Defying Gravity

08:30 - 16 April, 2019
Georges Kachaamy's Rising Oases Float in the Air Defying Gravity, © Georges Kachaamy. Image by Karim Khayati & Karl Abi Karam
© Georges Kachaamy. Image by Karim Khayati & Karl Abi Karam

Although James Blish’s “Cities in Flight” was not the first attempt to combine architecture and anti-gravity technology, it was in this book series that we can see it prevailing on an urban scale. Throughout its evolution, architecture has crawled out of caves, settled on grounds, climbed on pilotis, floated on water, stood high, and even danced. Now many argue that it is high time for it to move forward and assume some of its multi-directional and forthcoming probabilities.

Could Hovering Buildings be the Future of Sustainability?

09:30 - 28 June, 2015
Could Hovering Buildings be the Future of Sustainability?, Proposals such as Vincent Callebaut's "Hydrogenase" have always been science fiction as much as they are architecture - but with Arx Pax's MFA technology, is it time to think more carefully about how to design levitating buildings?. Image Courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures
Proposals such as Vincent Callebaut's "Hydrogenase" have always been science fiction as much as they are architecture - but with Arx Pax's MFA technology, is it time to think more carefully about how to design levitating buildings?. Image Courtesy of Vincent Callebaut Architectures

Could Hovering Buildings be the Future of Sustainability?

If Arx Pax, a cutting-edge technology firm led by Greg and Jill Henderson, has its way, levitating objects could become a common sight. The team is developing what they call Magnetic Field Architecture (MFA), a technology which controls electromagnetic energy to make objects hover, and at the several months ago, they used it to produce Hendo Hover, a hoverboard capable of carrying a person. While the fact that Arx Pax was able to produce a hoverboard is fascinating, the technology could have much more serious applications: as an architect, Greg Henderson envisions that one day MFA technology could be used in buildings to produce sustainable structures which can better survive earthquakes and other natural disasters. Is this goal realistic?