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Mexico

Zaha Hadid Architects and ETH Zurich Create 3D Knitted Concrete Pavilion Transportable via Suitcase

09:00 - 5 November, 2018
Zaha Hadid Architects and ETH Zurich Create 3D Knitted Concrete Pavilion Transportable via Suitcase, © Philippe Block via ZHA
© Philippe Block via ZHA

ETH Zurich, working in collaboration with Zaha Hadid Architects Computation and Design Group (ZHCODE) and Architecture Extrapolated (R-Ex) have unveiled a 3D-knitted shell serving as the primary shaping element for curved concrete structures.

The “KnitCandela” prototype represents the first application of this technology at an architectural scale, a five-tonne concrete structure on display at the Museo Universitario Arte Contemporaneo in Mexico City.

© Juan Pablo Allegre via ZHA © Leo Bieling via ZHA © Lex Reiter via ETH Zurich © Maria Verhulst via ETH Zurich + 14

Torre Reforma Wins the 2018 International Highrise Award

13:00 - 1 November, 2018
Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand
Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand

The office building Torre Reforma in Mexico City has won the prize for the world’s most innovative high rise awarded by the Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM). One of the world’s most important architectural prizes for tall buildings, the International Highrise Award is presented every two years to the project that best exemplifies the criteria of future-oriented design, functionality, innovative building technology, integration into urban development schemes, sustainability, and cost-effectiveness.

Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand + 5

Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions

09:30 - 18 October, 2018
Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions, Serpentine Pavilion 2016 / Bjarke Ingels. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Serpentine Pavilion 2016 / Bjarke Ingels. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

If the surest sign of summer in London is the appearance of a new pavilion in front of the Serpentine Gallery, then it’s perhaps fair to say that summer is over once the pavilion is taken down. The installations have gained prominence since its inaugural edition in 2000, acting as a kind of exclusive honor and indication of talent for those chosen to present; celebrated names from the past names include Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, and Olafur Eliasson.

Serpentine Pavilion 2015 / Selgas Cano. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2014 / Smiljan Radic. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2006 / Rem Koolhaas. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2007 / Olafur Eliasson, Kjetil Thorsen, Cecil Balmond. Image © Luke Hayes + 20

The 25 Largest Sports Stadiums in the World

06:00 - 4 September, 2018
The 25 Largest Sports Stadiums in the World, 1. Rungrado 1st of May Stadium / Pyongyang, North Korea. Image via Viktoria Gaman / Shutterstock.com
1. Rungrado 1st of May Stadium / Pyongyang, North Korea. Image via Viktoria Gaman / Shutterstock.com

In 776 BC, the Olympic Games of antiquity were hosted at the Olympia stadium in Peloponnese, Greece, an arena widely believed to be the world’s oldest stadium. The elongated U-shaped track and stand had a capacity of up to 45,000 people.

Almost 3000 years later, and the typology of the sports stadium continues to act as a gathering place for tens of thousands of eager spectators. As populations, and indeed revenue generated from sporting events continues to increase around the world, the design of sports stadiums is destined to follow suit.

Future of Foster + Partners / FR-EE Mexico City International Airport to be Decided by Public Vote

15:46 - 22 August, 2018
Future of Foster + Partners / FR-EE Mexico City International Airport to be Decided by Public Vote, © DBOX for Foster + Partners
© DBOX for Foster + Partners

Mexico’s President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has announced that a referendum will be held on whether or not the government should proceed with Foster + Partners’ proposed $13-billion Mexico City International Airport.

The scheme, already under construction, has been described by the incoming president as a “bottomless pit” and that “the plan is to provide the Mexican people all the relevant information, truthfully and objectively, so that we can all decide together on this important matter of national interest.”

The Stadiums That Could Host the 2026 World Cup in the US, Canada, and Mexico

08:00 - 14 August, 2018
© <a href='https://pixabay.com/en/landover-maryland-fedex-field-89813/'>Flikr user ID12019</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/deed.en'>CC0 1.0</a>
© Flikr user ID12019 licensed under CC0 1.0

I hope you’ve caught your breath after this year’s FIFA World Cup. France’s win in Moscow’s Luzhniki Stadium marked the end of an era; the last World Cup with a classic format. After the 2022 Winter tournament in Qatar, the competition will be expanded to 48 teams (rather than the current 32).

© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Metlife_stadium.jpg'>Anthony Quintano</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> © <a href='https://es.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archivo:BC_Place_2015_Women%27s_FIFA_World_Cup.jpg'>GoToVan</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Le_Stade_Olympique_3.jpg'>Tolivero</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a> The Stadiums That Could Host the 2026 World Cup in the US, Canada, and Mexico  + 27

10 ArchDaily Projects That You Can Book Through Airbnb

14:00 - 8 August, 2018
10 ArchDaily Projects That You Can Book Through Airbnb, La Muralla Roja / Ricardo Bofill. Image © Gregori Civera
La Muralla Roja / Ricardo Bofill. Image © Gregori Civera

ArchDaily and Airbnb were both founded in 2008, but for two very different reasons. Since then, ArchDaily has amassed a vast database of tens of thousands of buildings, located in cities and countries all around the world. Meanwhile, Airbnb has revolutionized the way in which we explore these countries, and use these buildings, even if just for one night.

While architecture lovers have occasionally been offered very limited experiences through Airbnb, such as a one-night stay on the Great Wall of China, or an architectural tour of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Stadium courtesy of Kengo Kuma, it transpires that Airbnb’s listings contain some notable architectural gems available for regular booking.

Kubuswoningen / Piet Blom. Image © Dirk Verwoerd Ex of In House / Steven Holl Architects. Image © Paul Warchol Sky Pods / Natura Vive. Image © Airbnb VillaLóla / ARKÍS architects. Image © ARKÍS architects + 52

The Failed Mexican Earthquake Memorial That Shows Protest Can Still Shape the Urban Environment

09:30 - 25 July, 2018
The proposed memorial to earthquake victims in Mexico City met with fierce resistance from residents who felt authorities had not done enough for the people left homeless by the tragedy. Image via Common Edge
The proposed memorial to earthquake victims in Mexico City met with fierce resistance from residents who felt authorities had not done enough for the people left homeless by the tragedy. Image via Common Edge

This article was originally published by Common Edge as "Letter From Mexico City: An Insidious Memorial to a Still-Unfolding Tragedy."

You wouldn’t think it looking at Mexico City today—a densely populated metropolis, where empty space is hard to come by—but decades earlier, following a devastating earthquake on September 19, 1985, more than 400 buildings collapsed, leaving a collection of open wounds spread over the cityscape.

Exactly thirty-two years later, the anniversary of that disaster was ominously commemorated with an emergency evacuation drill. Then, in one of those odd occurrences in which reality proves to be stranger than fiction, a sudden jolt scarcely two hours after the drill led to what would be yet another of the deadliest earthquakes in the city’s history. Buildings once again collapsed, leaving a rising-by-the-hour death toll that eventually reached 361, as well as swarms of bewildered citizens wandering the streets, frantically attempting to reach their loved ones through the weakened cell phone reception. “We’d just evacuated for the drill,” people said, like a collective mantra. “How could this happen again?”

Habitat for Orphan Girls Crowned 2018 House of the Year by The Architectural Review

12:30 - 23 July, 2018
Habitat for Orphan Girls Crowned 2018 House of the Year by The Architectural Review, Habitat for Orphan Girls in Khansar, Iran by ZAV Architects. Image via The Architectural Review
Habitat for Orphan Girls in Khansar, Iran by ZAV Architects. Image via The Architectural Review

The Architectural Review has chosen a Habitat for Orphan Girls in Iran by ZAV Architects as the 2018 House of the Year. A competition staged by the publication every year, the AR House Awards identify “originality and excellence in the design of dwellings,” recognizing private houses which go beyond the core function of shelter, and become “an object of fantasy, a source of delight, a talisman, and a testing ground.

The ninth edition of the awards saw six projects chosen from a shortlist of 16, which contained schemes from the UK, Ireland, Spain, Scandinavia, Canada, Latin America, Iran, Vietnam, India, Nepal, and Japan. Previous winners have included David Chipperfield’s Fayland House in 2015, UID Architects’ Cosmic House in 2016, and the anti-seismic prototype in 2017 by Edward Ng, Wan Li and Xinan Chi.

Frida Escobedo's Serpentine Pavilion Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

14:00 - 13 June, 2018
Frida Escobedo's Serpentine Pavilion Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Following the opening of the 2018 Serpentine Pavillion this week, designed by Mexican architect Frida Escobedo, photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has turned his lens to London. Ghinitoiu’s images, which you can discover below, capture the elemental beauty of Escobedo’s pavilion, defined by a permeable cement tile façade inspired by Mexican celosias.

Fusing elements typical to Mexican architecture with local London references, the pavilion centers on a courtyard enclosed by two rectangular volumes constructed using the characteristic celosia method.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 30

These Are The Latin American Cities With The Best Quality of Life

16:00 - 20 May, 2018
These Are The Latin American Cities With The Best Quality of Life, © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/jikatu/20111772669'>Jimmy Baikovicius [Flickr]</a>, licensed under  <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageMontevideo, Uruguay
© Jimmy Baikovicius [Flickr], licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0. ImageMontevideo, Uruguay

Mercer, the multinational consultancy recently announced that Vienna, Austria has been ranked as the city with the best quality of life in the world, for the ninth year in a row. In a ranking that is dominated by European cities in the highest positions, this year Vancouver (5th), Singapore (25th) and Port Louis (83rd) are the highest-ranking cities in North America, Asia, and Africa, respectively.

So, what is happening in Latin America? Montevideo, the capital of Uruguay, once again occupies the top position. "Although they are challenged by economic and political turmoil," experts at the consultancy explain, "cities in emerging markets are catching up with major cities, after decades of investment in infrastructure, recreational facilities, and housing for the purpose of attracting talent and multinational businesses," they add.

In its twentieth edition, the consultancy, which specializes in advising multinational companies in employee transfers, evaluates more than 450 cities around the world, analyzing 39 factors divided into 10 categories, including political and economic environment, socio-cultural status, hygiene, educational institutions, leisure, housing, the market, and natural disasters.

© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/beck32/7175474491'>Roberto C. [Flickr]</a>, licensed under <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/">CC BY-ND 2.0</a>. ImageMontevideo, Uruguay © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/deensel/39921091035'>Deensel [Flickr]</a>, licensed under <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>. ImageBuenos Aires, Argentina © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/armandolobos/23193056943'>a l o b o s [Flickr]</a>, licensed under <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>. ImageSantiago, Chile © <a href=https://www.flickr.com/photos/bz3rk/5731101473'>James Willamor [Flickr]</a>, licensed under <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageSan Juan, Puerto Rico + 11

Mexico City's Controversial Airport Project Could Be a Preservation Site for a Collection of Modernist Murals

09:30 - 8 May, 2018
Mexico City's Controversial Airport Project Could Be a Preservation Site for a Collection of Modernist Murals, Centro SCOP in Mexico City was shuttered after a series of devastating earthquakes. A new exhibition proposes rehousing its historically significant murals. Image Courtesy of Pablo López Luz/ Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura
Centro SCOP in Mexico City was shuttered after a series of devastating earthquakes. A new exhibition proposes rehousing its historically significant murals. Image Courtesy of Pablo López Luz/ Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "How a Small Mexico City Exhibition Fueled a Debate About Preservation and Power."

It’s a slate-gray day in Mexico City’s Colonia Narvarte neighborhood and mounting gusts signal imminent rain. Centro SCOP, a sprawling bureaucratic complex, rises sharply against this bleak backdrop. The building is a masterful, if not intimidating, example of Mexican Modernism, an H-shaped assemblage of muscular concrete volumes designed by architect Carlos Lazo, covered in an acre-and-a-half of vibrant mosaic murals.

At its peak, the building accommodated more than 3,000 workers for the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation (SCT). Today, save a security guard in its gatehouse, it is empty.

As part of the Archivo exhibition, FR-EE has proposed relocating Centro SCOP's murals to the airport it is co-designing with Foster + Partners. Image Courtesy of FR-EE Fernando Romero Enterprises/ Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura An artist's rendering of Centro SCOP. Image Courtesy of Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes (SCT)/ Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura An image of Centro SCOP, shortly after it opened in the mid 1950s. Image Courtesy of personal archive of Carlos Lazo Barreiro / Archivo General de la Nación/ Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura Juan O'Gorman's "Canto a La Patria (Parte 1)" (left) and "Independencia y Progreso" (right). Image Courtesy of Pablo López Luz/ Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura + 26

Mexican Houses That Show the Many Ways to Use Bricks

12:00 - 6 May, 2018
Mexican Houses That Show the Many Ways to Use Bricks, © Patrick Lopez
© Patrick Lopez

© Carlos Berdejo Mandujano © César Béjar © Ricardo Rodríguez Cortesía de Ariel Valenzuela + Diego Ledesma + 12

This week we present a selection of the best images of brick houses published on our site. These 11 Mexican projects reveal the diversity of expression that architects in the country have achieved through creative arrangements of the brick modules. read on for a selection of images from prominent photographers such as Carlos Berdejo Mandujano, Onnis Luque, and Patrick Lopez.

Social Design Work in Mexico Brings Community, Solidarity and Local Materials Together

14:00 - 5 May, 2018
Social Design Work in Mexico Brings Community, Solidarity and Local Materials Together, Cortesía de Colectivo CHOPEkE
Cortesía de Colectivo CHOPEkE

This project emerged during the summer of 2015, when CHOPEkE Collective, together with Paúl Pérez, a seminarian and active member of the group, visited the community of Santa Luisa de Marillac, located in the central periphery of Ciudad Juárez. At the time, members of the community had an "unworthy" space -as they called it- for their meetings and spiritual activities.

What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings

06:00 - 6 April, 2018
What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings, Han Zhang along with her team at <a href="http://www.archdaily.cn">ArchDaily China</a>. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang
Han Zhang along with her team at ArchDaily China. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang

There's an old, weary tune that people sing to caution against being an architect: the long years of academic training, the studio work that takes away from sleep, and the small job market in which too many people are vying for the same positions. When you finally get going, the work is trying as well. Many spend months or even years working on the computer and doing models before seeing any of the designs become concrete. If you're talking about the grind, architects know this well enough from their training, and this time of ceaseless endeavor in the workplace only adds to that despair.

Which is why more and more architects are branching out. Better hours, more interesting opportunities, and a chance to do more than just build models. Furthermore, the skills you learn as an architect, such as being sensitive to space, and being able to grasp the cultural and societal demands of a place, can be put to use in rather interesting ways. Here, 3 editors at ArchDaily talk about being an architect, why they stopped designing buildings, and what they do in their work now. 

Mexican Water-Managing Public Space Triumphs in Global LafargeHolcim Awards 2018

12:30 - 28 March, 2018
Mexican Water-Managing Public Space Triumphs in Global LafargeHolcim Awards 2018, Winning schemes were situated in Mexico, Niger, and the USA. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards
Winning schemes were situated in Mexico, Niger, and the USA. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards

Results have been announced for the 5th Global LafargeHolcim Awards for Sustainable Construction, with three women-led teams awarded the gold, silver, and bronze positions. The design competition asked participants to speculate on future methods of balancing environmental performance, social responsibility and economic growth, “exemplifying architectural excellence and a high degree of transferability.”

The competition attracted over 5,000 submissions from 131 countries. Having been regionally assessed by juries in Europe, North America, Latin America, the Middle East/Africa and Asia Pacific, 55 successful proposals were entered for the global awards, where six winning schemes were selected.

Gold Medal: Hydropuncture in Mexico. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards Silver Medal: Legacy Restored in Niger. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards Bronze Medal: Grassroots Microgrid in Michigan. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards Territorial Figure: Acknowledgment and Next Generation Prize Winner. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards + 67

Library at Tecnológico de Monterrey / Sasaki

11:00 - 22 March, 2018
© Sasaki
© Sasaki

© Sasaki © Sasaki © Sasaki © Sasaki + 14

  • Architects

  • Location

    Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico
  • Design Team

    Isabel Zempel, Caroline Braga, Mauricio Gomez, Letitia Tormay, Nicholas Steinkraus, Nina Chase, Zhangkan Zhou
  • Architects of Record

    GLR Arquitectos, RDLP Arquitectos
  • Client

  • Area

    17000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Contemporary Architecture Captured by Mexican Photographers

08:00 - 17 March, 2018
via Portada
via Portada

The history of Mexican photography has contributed to highlighting Mexico's presence in the world. Photographers like Elsa Medina, Lola Álvarez Bravo, Graciela Iturbide, Maya Goded, and Juan Rulfo have masterfully portrayed the life of the buildings, houses and the streets of a rapidly built, nineteenth-century Mexico. 

As a consequence, the contemporary scene of Mexican photography has become a fundamental tool for architecture and has contributed to a better visual understanding of the works that are erected every day.

Photography and architecture are two disciplines that go hand in hand and whose relationship has been reinforced thanks to the digital tools that we currently have. For that reason, we have compiled the work of contemporary Mexican photographers who record our walk through the world we live in and contribute to constructing the image of contemporary Mexico.