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Mexico

Mexican Water-Managing Public Space Triumphs in Global LafargeHolcim Awards 2018

12:30 - 28 March, 2018
Mexican Water-Managing Public Space Triumphs in Global LafargeHolcim Awards 2018, Winning schemes were situated in Mexico, Niger, and the USA. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards
Winning schemes were situated in Mexico, Niger, and the USA. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards

Results have been announced for the 5th Global LafargeHolcim Awards for Sustainable Construction, with three women-led teams awarded the gold, silver, and bronze positions. The design competition asked participants to speculate on future methods of balancing environmental performance, social responsibility and economic growth, “exemplifying architectural excellence and a high degree of transferability.”

The competition attracted over 5,000 submissions from 131 countries. Having been regionally assessed by juries in Europe, North America, Latin America, the Middle East/Africa and Asia Pacific, 55 successful proposals were entered for the global awards, where six winning schemes were selected.

Gold Medal: Hydropuncture in Mexico. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards Silver Medal: Legacy Restored in Niger. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards Bronze Medal: Grassroots Microgrid in Michigan. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards Territorial Figure: Acknowledgment and Next Generation Prize Winner. Image Courtesy of Global LafargeHolcim Awards + 67

Library at Tecnológico de Monterrey / Sasaki

11:00 - 22 March, 2018
© Sasaki
© Sasaki

© Sasaki © Sasaki © Sasaki © Sasaki + 14

  • Architects

  • Location

    Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico
  • Design Team

    Isabel Zempel, Caroline Braga, Mauricio Gomez, Letitia Tormay, Nicholas Steinkraus, Nina Chase, Zhangkan Zhou
  • Architects of Record

    GLR Arquitectos, RDLP Arquitectos
  • Client

  • Area

    17000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Contemporary Architecture Captured by Mexican Photographers

08:00 - 17 March, 2018
via Portada
via Portada

The history of Mexican photography has contributed to highlighting Mexico's presence in the world. Photographers like Elsa Medina, Lola Álvarez Bravo, Graciela Iturbide, Maya Goded, and Juan Rulfo have masterfully portrayed the life of the buildings, houses and the streets of a rapidly built, nineteenth-century Mexico. 

As a consequence, the contemporary scene of Mexican photography has become a fundamental tool for architecture and has contributed to a better visual understanding of the works that are erected every day.

Photography and architecture are two disciplines that go hand in hand and whose relationship has been reinforced thanks to the digital tools that we currently have. For that reason, we have compiled the work of contemporary Mexican photographers who record our walk through the world we live in and contribute to constructing the image of contemporary Mexico. 

The Curious Design Enigmas of Chichén Itzá's Temple of Kukulkán

09:30 - 16 March, 2018
The Curious Design Enigmas of Chichén Itzá's Temple of Kukulkán, Courtesy of Ezra Schwartz
Courtesy of Ezra Schwartz

This article was originally published by Ezra Schwartz on LinkedIn. It has been reprinted here with permission from the author. 

Following a recent family visit to Chichén Itzá, I became somewhat obsessed with a couple of design enigmas I found there:

Design Enigma 1: The large pyramid in this amazing archeological complex, known as the Temple of Kukulkán, is highly symmetrical. But the first thing I observed when we approached it and stood in front of its west side, is that the structure on top of the pyramid (A above), is not center-aligned relative to the 9 terraces below it, as one would expect*. The visual guides 1 and 2 show the misalignment (images above and below).

Spotlight: Luis Barragán

10:30 - 9 March, 2018
Spotlight: Luis Barragán, Casa Gilardi. Imagevia <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Casa_Giraldi_Luis_Barragan.JPG'>Wikimedia user Ulises00</a> (public domain)
Casa Gilardi. Imagevia Wikimedia user Ulises00 (public domain)

One of Mexico's greatest architects, Luis Ramiro Barragán Morfín (March 9, 1902 – November 22, 1988) revolutionized modern architecture in the country with his use of bright colors reminiscent of the traditional architecture of Mexico, and with works such as his Casa Barragán, the Chapel of the Capuchinas, the Torres de Satélite, "Los Clubes" (Cuadra San Cristobal and Fuente de los Amantes), and the Casa Gilardi, among many others.

These 6 Firms Are Spearheading the Post-Digital Drawing Craze in Mexico

14:00 - 4 March, 2018
Cortesía de PALMA
Cortesía de PALMA

The hyperrealistic representation of architecture is not a new concept due to the ubiquity of tools that offer the possibility of creating perplexing images with photographs. However, those who defend the expressive capacity of hand drawings have found ways to take advantage of the digital tools of the last decades to represent their architectural projects. 

A new group of young Mexican architects is committed to a form of representation that relies on tools from our era, simultaneously taking up concepts from the sixties and seventies, where the technique of collage made it possible to face the frustrating reality that took place at the time to represent the utopias thought up by architects. 

Benjamín Romano: "I Focus on Improving the Building"

09:30 - 23 February, 2018
Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand
Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand

Visiting Mexico City several times in recent months enabled me to get to know a number of leading architects there. In the process, I was in turn directed to other architects that were new to me, whom I then discovered were, in fact, the leading and most revered architects in the country according to the local architectural community. I am particularly referring to Alberto Kalach and Mauricio Rocha, whose interviews were published in this column last year, and Benjamín Romano, whose name came up when I asked a number of architects to cite their favorite building from recent years in Mexico City. Along with the absolute favorite, Vasconcelos Library by Kalach, another structure stood out: Torre Reforma, a 57-story office tower, the tallest building in the city. The following conversation with Romano, its architect, took place inside this unusually powerful and inventive structure.

Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand + 33

Teddy Cruz Wins 2018 Vilcek Prize in Architecture

06:00 - 7 February, 2018
Teddy Cruz Wins 2018 Vilcek Prize in Architecture, Courtesy of The Vilcek Foundation
Courtesy of The Vilcek Foundation

Each year the Vilcek Foundation selects American immigrant champions of the arts and sciences. This year the 2018 Vilcek Prize in Architecture was awarded to Guatemala-born, and now San Diego-based, professor and architect Teddy Cruz. Cruz uses his past experiences, living in Guatemala during its civil war, to focus his academic and professional career on shaping political and socioeconomic forces.

Félix Candela’s Concrete Shells Through Photographs, Architectural Models and Plans

14:00 - 4 February, 2018
Courtesy of Alexander Eisenschmidt
Courtesy of Alexander Eisenschmidt

Spanish and Mexican architect Félix Candela is widely recognized as one of the most prominent figures in 20th century architecture. His innovative experiments with reinforced concrete produced iconic buildings deemed cascarones, or 'shell structures', such as the Pavilion of Cosmic Rays at UNAM, Mexico City (1951); the Chapel Lomas de Cuernavaca, Cuernavaca (1958); Los Manantiales Restaurant, Xochimilco (1958); and the Palace of Sports for the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City. 

Courtesy of Alexander Eisenschmidt Courtesy of Alexander Eisenschmidt Courtesy of Alexander Eisenschmidt Courtesy of Alexander Eisenschmidt + 18

Top Young North American Firms Win The Architectural League's 2018 Emerging Voices Awards

12:40 - 1 February, 2018
Top Young North American Firms Win The Architectural League's 2018 Emerging Voices Awards, Bruma House; Estado de México, Mexico, 2017 / Fernanda Canales + Claudia Rodríguez. Photography: Rafael Gamo. Image © Fernanda Canales
Bruma House; Estado de México, Mexico, 2017 / Fernanda Canales + Claudia Rodríguez. Photography: Rafael Gamo. Image © Fernanda Canales

The Architectural League of New York has announced the recipients of its 2018 Emerging Voices awards, spotlighting individuals and firms “with distinct design voices and the potential to influence the disciplines of architecture, landscape design, and urbanism.”

Felix Candela's Concrete Shells: An Engineered Architecture for Mexico and Chicago

12:13 - 29 January, 2018
Felix Candela's Concrete Shells: An Engineered Architecture for Mexico and Chicago, Capilla de Palmira (Chapel of Palmira) Lomas de Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico, 1958 – 1959
Capilla de Palmira (Chapel of Palmira) Lomas de Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico, 1958 – 1959

This exhibition roots Félix Candela (1910-1997) as one of the most prolific architects of the 20th century in his advanced geometric designs and lasting influence in contemporary architecture. It originated through the research of scholar Juan Ignacio del Cueto and is curated by the architectural theorist and designer Alexander Eisenschmidt. The exhibition spotlights Félix Candela’s Concrete Shells through photographs, architectural models, and plans, as well as archival material from his time as a professor at the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois at Chicago from 1971 to 1978.

Candela exiled to Mexico

Tatiana Bilbao: “Architecture Should Benefit Every Single Human Being on This Planet”

09:30 - 12 January, 2018
Tatiana Bilbao: “Architecture Should Benefit Every Single Human Being on This Planet”, House in Ajijic, Jalostitlán, Mexico, 2010. Image © Iwan Baan
House in Ajijic, Jalostitlán, Mexico, 2010. Image © Iwan Baan

As part of a generation of designers that have, in recent years, put Mexico on the map, Tatiana Bilbao is an architect that is increasingly part of the profession’s global consciousness. But, while some Mexican architects have made their mark with spectacular architecture following the international trend of “iconic” architecture, Bilbao opted instead for a more people-focused approach. In this interview, the latest in Vladimir Belogolovsky’s “City of Ideas” series, Bilbao explains how she got into this type of community-building architecture, her thoughts on architectural form, and her ambitions for the future.

Vladimir Belogolovsky: The more I talk to architects of your generation or my generation, the more it becomes apparent that architecture has absolutely no boundaries. In other words, architecture is not just about buildings. More and more, architecture is about building communities.

Tatiana Bilbao: Absolutely. For me, that is the most important part of architecture. Architecture is not about building a building; architecture is about building a community.

Housing in Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, 2015. Image © Jaime Navarro Bioinnova, Culiacán Rosales, Mexico, 2012. Image © Iwan Baan House in Ajijic, Jalostitlán, Mexico, 2010. Image © Iwan Baan Casa Ventura, San Pedro Garza Garcia, Mexico, 2011. Image © Rory Gardiner + 20

Richard Meier & Partners International Projects To Look For In 2018

08:00 - 26 December, 2017
Richard Meier & Partners International Projects To Look For In 2018, Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners
Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners

The new year is almost here, and Richard Meier & Partners has four international projects that will be coming to fruition. These new multi-use building designs play with light, transparency, and volume as well as respond to their varying urban context. 

The Best University Proposals for Social Housing in Latin America and Spain in 2017

08:00 - 2 December, 2017
The Best University Proposals for Social Housing in Latin America and Spain in 2017

At the end of September, we invited our Spanish-speaking readers to send us their social housing proposals completed at a university level. Social housing is still a challenge for much of Latin America and although every year hundreds of architecture students work on projects that reflect their concerns in the social housing field, its visibility is very low and its materialization is null. At a time when the Global South has pursued its own responses to its own problems, the university response on social housing should be taken into account by the State, both of whom are interested in the common good. 

Out of 116 proposals received from Spain and 11 Latin American countries, this selection of 20 ideas represents the different challenges and state of the problems in social housing. While some approach Colombia's post-conflict scenario for rural inhabitants, some propose answers to the insertion of social housing in already densified areas, to which the beneficiaries tend to be relegated by the value of land and housing. Other ideas point to the reconversion of infrastructure, modulation, the integration of indigenous peoples and natural disasters.

We believe that the selection not only highlights the efforts of students and academics to address contingent problems but will also open up the discussion about social housing, often relegated only as a one-dimensional problem when in reality, poverty is multidimensional.

Foro Boca / Rojkind Arquitectos

09:00 - 1 December, 2017
© Jaime Navarro
© Jaime Navarro

© Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro + 18

  • Architects

  • Location

    Boca del Río, Ver., Mexico
  • Architect in Charge

    Michel Rojkind
  • Architectural project

    Agustín Pereyra (Project Manager) Arturo Ortíz, Adrián Aguilar, Sandra Carvajal, Fernanda Casar, Salvador Cortéz, Diego Díaz Lezama, Paulina Elizalde, Rubén García, Daniel Gaytán, Paulina Goycoolea, Jorge González R., Alfredo Hernández , Laura Hernández, Pablo Herrera, Julieta Inclán, Carsten Lemme Andrea León, Félix Mendoza, Gerardo Salinas, Julio Serralde, Alfonso Paz, Cynthia Ponce, Víctor Velázquez, Ditter Vergara, Beatriz Zavala.
  • Area

    5410.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Victor Legorreta: “Sometimes, Architects Take Themselves Too Seriously”

09:30 - 17 November, 2017
Victor Legorreta: “Sometimes, Architects Take Themselves Too Seriously”, Pavilion Hacienda Matao, 2014. Image © Cristiano Mascaro
Pavilion Hacienda Matao, 2014. Image © Cristiano Mascaro

As the son of famed Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta, and now the leader of the firm which he joined under his father in 1989, Victor Legorreta is one of Mexico’s most visible architects. In this interview, the latest in Vladimir Belogolovsky’s “City of Ideas” series, Legorreta discusses the complexities of following in the footsteps of his father and how, in his view, good architecture is made.

Vladimir Belogolovsky: What kind of projects are you working on at this moment?

Victor Legorreta: We work on a variety of projects—about 60 percent are in Mexico and the rest are abroad. Mexico City is increasingly becoming a vertical city in its attempt to reverse its tendency of growing into an endless and dysfunctional sprawl. We are working on several mixed-use towers with retail, entertainment, restaurants, offices, and residential uses in a single building to enable people to find everything they need within easy reach, to lessen the pressure on traffic, which in the city is now among the worst in the world. We are also working with The Aga Khan Foundation on two projects—a university in Tanzania and a hospital and university in Uganda.

BBVA Bancomer Tower, 2016 / LEGORRETA + Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners. Image © Lourdes Legorreta Visual Arts Center, Santa Fe, 1999. Image © Lourdes Legorreta Papalote Children's Museum and Planetarium, 1993, planetarium 2003, renovation 2016. Image © Ma. Dolores Robles-Martinez Gómez Postgraduate Building, Faculty of Economics, UNAM, 2010. Image © Allen Vallejo + 59

CEMEX Announces Mexico Winners In Their 2017 Building Awards

10:30 - 14 November, 2017
CEMEX Announces Mexico Winners In Their 2017 Building Awards

The CEMEX Building Award recognizes the best projects in Mexico and the rest of the world that use concrete in a creative and innovative way, with a focus on sustainability and social welfare. This year, the award received 545 entries in its Mexican Edition, of which 18 were awarded prizes. 

The awards ceremony took place on November 9th in Mexico City, with finalists attending from the Czech Republic, France, the United States, the United Arab Emirates and various countries from South America.

The winners of the Mexico Edition were:

CEMEX Announces International Winners In Their 2017 Building Awards

12:00 - 13 November, 2017
CEMEX Announces International Winners In Their 2017 Building Awards, Cortesía de CEMEX
Cortesía de CEMEX

The CEMEX Building Award recognizes the best projects in Mexico and the rest of the world that use concrete in a creative and innovative way, with a focus on sustainability and social welfare. This year, the award received 70 entries in the 5 categories and 4 special awards of its International Edition.