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Jersey City

AD Classics: Citigroup Center / Hugh Stubbins + William Le Messurier

22:00 - 6 November, 2018
AD Classics: Citigroup Center / Hugh Stubbins + William Le Messurier, © Flickr user paulkhor
© Flickr user paulkhor

This article was originally published on November 5, 2014. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

In a city of skyscrapers of nearly every shape and size, the Citigroup Center on Lexington Avenue is one of New York’s most unique. Resting on four stilts perfectly centered on each side, it cantilevers seventy-two feet over the sidewalk and features a trademark 45-degree sloping crown at its summit. The original structure responsible for these striking features also contained a grave oversight that nearly resulted in structural catastrophe, giving the tower the moniker of “the greatest disaster never told” when the story finally was told in 1995. The incredible tale—now legendary among structural engineers—adds a fascinating back-story to one of the most iconic fixtures of the Manhattan skyline.

© Flickr user Steven Severing-Haus © Flickr user paulkhor © Flickr user Jeff Stvan © Flickr user Axel Drainville + 10

COOKFOX Studio / COOKFOX Architects

14:00 - 1 November, 2018
COOKFOX Studio / COOKFOX Architects, © Eric Laignel
© Eric Laignel

© Eric Laignel © Eric Laignel © Eric Laignel © Eric Laignel + 11

  • Architects

  • Location

    New York, NY, United States
  • Lead Architects

    COOKFOX Architects
  • Area

    18275.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

AD Classics: Austrian Cultural Forum / Raimund Abraham

22:00 - 27 October, 2018
AD Classics: Austrian Cultural Forum / Raimund Abraham, © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York
© Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York

This article was originally published on May 25, 2015. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Before the impossibly “super-thin” tower became ubiquitous on the Midtown Manhattan skyline, Raimund Abraham’s Austrian Cultural Forum challenged the limits of what could be built on the slenderest of urban lots. Working with a footprint no bigger than a townhouse (indeed, one occupied the site before the present tower), Abraham erected a daring twenty-four story high-rise only twenty-five feet across. Instantly recognizable by its profile, a symmetrical, blade-like curtain wall cascading violently toward the sidewalk, ACFNY was heralded by Kenneth Frampton as “the most significant modern piece of architecture to be realized in Manhattan since the Seagram Building and the Guggenheim Museum of 1959.” [1]

The massing of the building is dictated solely by zoning laws and the immediacy of its neighbors. Image © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York The director's office that occupies the box-like protrusion on the southern facade. Image © Photo by David Plakke, davidplakke.com; Courtesy of Austrian Cultural Forum New York East-facing section with the "scissor stairs" on the left-hand side + 7

AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen

22:00 - 21 October, 2018
AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen, © Cameron Blaylock
© Cameron Blaylock

This article was originally published on June 16, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Built in the early days of airline travel, the TWA Terminal is a concrete symbol of the rapid technological transformations which were fueled by the outset of the Second World War. Eero Saarinen sought to capture the sensation of flight in all aspects of the building, from a fluid and open interior, to the wing-like concrete shell of the roof. At TWA’s behest, Saarinen designed more than a functional terminal; he designed a monument to the airline and to aviation itself.

This AD Classic features a series of exclusive images by Cameron Blaylock, photographed in May 2016. Blaylock used a Contax camera and Zeiss lenses with Rollei black and white film to reflect camera technology of the 1960s.

© Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock + 26

AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon

22:00 - 19 October, 2018
AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon, (2005). Image © Wikimedia user robertpaulyoung (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)
(2005). Image © Wikimedia user robertpaulyoung (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)

This article was originally published on December 5, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Even in Manhattan—a sea of skyscrapers—the Empire State Building towers over its neighbours. Since its completion in 1931 it has been one of the most iconic architectural landmarks in the United States, standing as the tallest structure in the world until the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center were constructed in Downtown Manhattan four decades later. Its construction in the early years of the Great Depression, employing thousands of workers and requiring vast material resources, was driven by more than commercial interest: the Empire State Building was to be a monument to the audacity of the United States of America, “a land which reached for the sky with its feet on the ground.”[1]

Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageLaying of the tower's foundations The pinnacle of the tower. Image © Wikimedia user David Corby (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0) Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction + 6

AD Classics: New Museum / SANAA

22:00 - 14 October, 2018
AD Classics: New Museum / SANAA, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

This article was originally published on July 22, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

The New Museum is the product of a daring vision to establish a radical, politicized center for contemporary art in New York City. With the aim of distinguishing itself from the city’s existing art institutions through a focus on emerging artists, the museum’s name embodies its pioneering spirit. Over the two decades following its foundation in 1977, it gained a strong reputation for its bold artistic program, and eventually outgrew its inconspicuous home in a SoHo loft. Keen to establish a visual presence and to reach a wider audience, in 2003 the Japanese architectural firm SANAA was commissioned to design a dedicated home for the museum. The resulting structure, a stack of rectilinear boxes which tower over the Bowery, would be the first and, thus far, the only purpose-built contemporary art museum in New York City.[1]

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 30

AD Classics: Pennsylvania Station / McKim, Mead & White

22:00 - 5 October, 2018
AD Classics: Pennsylvania Station / McKim, Mead & White, © wikimedia commons
© wikimedia commons

This article was originally published on February 11, 2014. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

New York City’s original Pennsylvania Station was a monument to movement and an expression of American economic power. In 1902, the noted firm McKim, Mead and White was selected by the President of the Pennsylvania Railroad to design its Manhattan terminal. Completed in 1910, the gigantic steel and stone building covered four city blocks until its demolition in 1963, when it ceded to economic strains hardly fifty years after opening.

© wikimedia commons Track level and concourses. Image © Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Detroit Publishing Company Collection Concourse from South, 1962. Image © Cervin Robinson - Historic American Buildings Survey Facade from Northeast. Image © Cervin Robinson - Historic American Buildings Survey + 40

adidas NYC / Gensler

17:00 - 24 September, 2018
adidas NYC / Gensler, © Dirk Tacke, Courtesy of adidas
© Dirk Tacke, Courtesy of adidas

© Dirk Tacke, Courtesy of adidas © Dirk Tacke, Courtesy of adidas © Dirk Tacke, Courtesy of adidas © Dirk Tacke, Courtesy of adidas + 13

  • Architects

  • Location

    New York, NY, United States
  • Area

    45000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

150 Charles / Dirtworks Landscape Architecture

09:00 - 8 September, 2018
150 Charles / Dirtworks Landscape Architecture, © Mark Weinberg
© Mark Weinberg

© Mark Weinberg © Mark Weinberg © Mark Weinberg © Mark Weinberg + 15

Lycée Français de New York / Ennead Architects

12:00 - 19 April, 2018
Lycée Français de New York / Ennead Architects, © Richard Barnes
© Richard Barnes

© Richard Barnes © Richard Barnes © Richard Barnes © Richard Barnes + 33

  • Architects

  • Location

    New York, United States
  • Design Team

    Megan Beddoe, Alfonso Gorini ,Steven Caputo, Steven Chang AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Michael Chen, Lucy Ciletti, Andrew Comfort, Frank de Santis, Amanda Faye, Chris Hall, James Ke, Dean Kim, Janny Kim, Chris Koon, Molly McGowan AIA, Charmian Place, Michael Regan, Kevin Rice, Mary Rowe, Rainier Simoneaux, Oliver Sippl, Margaret Tyrpa AIA, Yvonne Yang, Robert Young AIA, John Zimmer
  • Area

    176000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Fulton Center / Grimshaw

10:00 - 14 January, 2016
Fulton Center / Grimshaw, Courtesy of James Ewing
Courtesy of James Ewing

Courtesy of James Ewing Courtesy of James Ewing © Halley Tsai / Grimshaw Courtesy of James Ewing + 22

Shokan House / Jay Bargmann

10:00 - 9 December, 2015
Shokan House / Jay Bargmann, © Brad Feinknopf
© Brad Feinknopf

© Brad Feinknopf © Brad Feinknopf © Brad Feinknopf © Brad Feinknopf + 58

This Proposed Pedestrian Bridge Lets You Walk Between Manhattan and New Jersey

08:00 - 14 October, 2015
This Proposed Pedestrian Bridge Lets You Walk Between Manhattan and New Jersey, Courtesy of Jeff Jordan Architects, via http://libertybridgeorg.wix.com/libertybridge
Courtesy of Jeff Jordan Architects, via http://libertybridgeorg.wix.com/libertybridge

Despite being separated by only a few miles, Manhattan and Jersey City seem much further apart; the Hudson River forces commuters to take long, roundabout routes or rely on the over-worked PATH system. Inspired by a need for connectivity between the two cities, Kevin Shane began conceptualizing a new pedestrian bridge, dubbed Liberty Bridge, which would connect Jersey City to Battery Park. Read more about this conceptual proposal after the break.

Pierson’s Way / Bates Masi Architects

09:00 - 3 July, 2015
Pierson’s Way / Bates Masi Architects, © Michael Moran
© Michael Moran

© Michael Moran © Michael Moran © Michael Moran © Michael Moran + 15

A-Frame ReThink / Bromley Caldari Architects

13:00 - 12 June, 2015
A-Frame ReThink / Bromley Caldari Architects, © Mikiko Kikuyama
© Mikiko Kikuyama

© Mikiko Kikuyama © Mikiko Kikuyama © Mikiko Kikuyama © Mikiko Kikuyama + 21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Fire Island, United States
  • Collaborators

    Eurometal (stairs), Lynbrook (skylights), North Shore Window & Door (window)
  • Area

    218.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

Fort Greene Pavilion / O'Neill McVoy Architects

01:00 - 16 April, 2014
Fort Greene Pavilion / O'Neill McVoy Architects, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan       © Iwan Baan       © Iwan Baan       © Iwan Baan       + 11

Richard Meier Model Museum Opens at Mana Contemporary

01:00 - 20 March, 2014
Richard Meier Model Museum Opens at Mana Contemporary, © Steven Sze
© Steven Sze

Mana Contemporary is the new home to the museum of one of the most celebrated architects of our time. The Richard Meier Model Museum opened to the public on Sunday, January 12.

HWKN + Handel Architects Break Ground on New Jersey's Tallest Building

01:00 - 18 March, 2014
HWKN + Handel Architects Break Ground on New Jersey's Tallest Building, © Hollwich Kushner (HWKN) + Handel Architects
© Hollwich Kushner (HWKN) + Handel Architects

Jersey City’s Journal Square will soon reach new heights, as Hollwich Kushner (HWKN) and Handel Architects have broken ground on what will be the tallest building in New Jersey: Journal Squared. The transit-oriented urban renewal project will be completed in three phases; the first, which will add 540 residential units to the area, is planned for completion in mid-2016. Once the 2.3 million square foot project is complete, three metal panel clad towers will dominated the skyline, ultimately totaling in 1,840 units and reaching up to 70 stories.