Arjen Oosterman

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Are These "The World's Best Graduation Projects" of 2017?

Once every two years architecture schools around the world are invited to submit their single, finest graduation project to the Archiprix International competition and exhibition. This year, the event selected Ahmedabad, in India, to exhibit the results. Here Arjen Oosterman, Editor-in-Chief of Volume, reviews the event and the work on display. You can read an interview with the Director of Archiprix, Henk van der Veen, here.

From its inception at the dawn of the millennium (2001), Archiprix International has proved to be an adventure with enormous ambition. To collect, once every two years, the very best graduation projects from architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design schools around the world is no small feat. To comprehensively exhibit this material is also a challenge, and to create a meaningful and productive event around the award session—giving center stage to the selected graduates and their projects—is a task akin to walking a tightrope. And yet, this is what they are achieving.

Award-winning ‘Housing for Construction Workers in Ahmedabad’, designed by Hannah Broatch (Auckland, New Zealand), confronts the poor living conditions of migrant workers. Image Courtesy of Archiprix InternationalBoth Nominee and Participants’ favorite (24 votes), ‘Walk Around Music’ by Hannah LaSota (University Park, USA) locates a Sensorium in underground Detroit ‘to evoke motion and elicit emotion’. Image Courtesy of Archiprix InternationalBoth Nominee and Participants’ favorite (24 votes), ‘Walk Around Music’ by Hannah LaSota (University Park, USA) locates a Sensorium in underground Detroit ‘to evoke motion and elicit emotion’. Image Courtesy of Archiprix International‘A Different Kind of Museum’ by Andrei Puică (Timisoara, Romania) recycles abandoned rural homes. The plan addresses conservation, modernity, urbanization and cultural identity in one gesture. The project was selected as participants’ favorite (19 votes). Image Courtesy of Archiprix International+ 7

The Disappearance of the Architectural Icon: Henk van der Veen on Archiprix International

Once every two years architecture schools around the world are invited to submit their single, finest graduation project to the Archiprix International competition and exhibition. Since its inception in 2001 (born out of the Dutch Archiprix), an ever increasing number of schools choose to participate. This year, Archiprix International selected Ahmedabad, in India, to exhibit the results. Arjen Oosterman, Editor-in-Chief of Volume, spoke to Archiprix Director and "Mister Archiprix" Henk van der Veen.

After "Are We Human?" – Beatriz Colomina and Mark Wigley Discuss the Istanbul Manifesto

With Are We Human—the exhibition of the 3rd Istanbul Design Biennial, which ran for one month at the end of 2016—curators Beatriz Colomina and Mark Wigley were researching the fundamental notion of ‘design’. Their historic, cultural and conceptual exploration attempted to unravel the various programs and ambitions behind a (mainly) market driven inventiveness, which is presented as progress. This pushed the notion of design and the biennale as a format beyond their established definitions.

Curatorial Team, The Invention of the Human. 3rd Istanbul Design Biennial (2016) – Alt. Image © Sahir Ugur ErenCuratorial Team, Design in 2 Seconds – Curatorial Intervention. 3rd Istanbul Design Biennial (2016) – Alt. Image © Sahir Ugur ErenPedro Alonso, Hugo Palmarola, Archaeology of Things Larger than Earth. 3rd Istanbul Design Biennial (2016) – Alt. Image © Sahir Ugur Erenm-a-u-s-e-r, Köçek Dance Floor. 3rd Istanbul Design Biennial (2016) – Alt. Image © Sahir Ugur Eren+ 9

A Tilting Horizon: Reflecting on 50 Issues of VOLUME and What's Yet to Come

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In this editorial from VOLUME's milestone 50th issue, Arjen Oosterman—the magazine's Editor-in-Chief—reflects on over ten years of cultural production and discourse and outlines what is to come. ArchDaily will be sharing a selection of the articles from this issue over the coming weeks.

Moving forward implies looking back. When we started this research engine called VOLUME in 2005, economic, political, and social conditions were very different to how they are today. The intention to rethink the agency of ‘beyond’ as driver for change inevitably means historicizing the trajectory of the VOLUME project so far. That said, we really didn’t want to turn VOLUME itself into the subject of reflection. So we’ll instead talk about the present and, in so doing, find history creeping its way in whether we like it or not.