Playa Vida Residence / Casis Architects

© Fernando Alda

Architects: Casis Architects
Location: Coronado,
Architect In Charge: Gonzalo Casis
Design Team: Iván Casís M, Ivan Casis Jr. and Juan Jose Casis
Area: 2,000 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Fernando Alda

Casa del Horno / Fémur Arquitectura

© Fernando Alda

Architects: Fémur Arquitectura
Location: ,
Team: Ramón Zafrani, Gilberto Guardia
Area: 1,150 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Fernando Alda

Bermingham House / ENSITU

© Sylvia Grünhut

Architects: ENSITU
Location: , Republic of Panama
Architect In Charge: S.A., Patrick Dillon
Design Team: Brenda Gotti, Zitta Pozo, Iben Jaramillo, Yolanda Fernández, Anabel Velarde, Emilio Rivadeneira, Aristides Robles
Area: 480 sqm
Year: 2009
Photographs: Sylvia Grünhut

Panamá Bank Tower / Herreros Arquitectos

© Fernando Alda

Architects: Herreros Arquitectos
Location: Costa del Este,
Project Architects: + Mallol y Mallol
Project Managers: Jens Richter (HA), Ignacio Mallol (M&M)
Project Team: Gonzalo Rivas Zinno, Carmen Antón, Joanna Socha (HA), Ruben Taboada (M&M)
Client: Banco de Panamá
Area: 35,395 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Fernando Alda

In Progress: The Biomuseo / Gehry Partners

© Victoria Murillo / Istmophoto.com / Biomuseo

The Puente de Vida Museum, more commonly referred to as The Biomuseo, will be ’s first design in all of Latin America. It is located in Panama in the area called Amador, which sits only a few blocks from the country’s principal cruise port and is adjacent to Panama City. The mission of the Biomuseo is to “offer an impressing and educational experience about the biodiversity and emergence of the isthmus in Panama in order to motivate all Panamanians to get to know and to value this natural component of their identity, as well as to generate in all its visitors the need to protect the environment” (Biomuseo Website). The Biomuseo intends to explore the importance of Panama’s biological systems and its emergence as a geological link between North and South America, both of which have had global impacts many are unaware of.

With these goals in mind, it quickly became clear that the museum design needed to be something very special to attract the international attention its founders desired. They wanted the museum to be a never-before-seen kind of design and to serve as a new architectural icon for Panama, much like the Eiffel Tower does for France or the Tower of Pisa for Italy. With the participation of  as well as the world-renowned landscape architect Edwina von Gal & Company, the Biomuseo began to take form: an extremely unique, Gehry-esque structure surrounded by an open botanical park that complements the exhibits within.

More after the break…

Video: Frank Gehry’s Biomuseo, The Panama Series


The Biomuseo, or Museum of Biodiversity, in City is Frank Gehry’s first project in Latin America. The building, situated on the mouth of the Panama Canal , is a colourful design of metal-plated canopies sustained by concrete columns. It will house eight galleries and tell the story of Panama’s diverse biological culture and its global impact. It is projected that, once finished, the 4000 m2 space will play a significant role in Panamanian society, culture and education. Here, one of the museum’s exhibit coordinators, Darien Montañes, explains the work involved in bringing a project of this scale to life.

Panama Rainforest Discovery Center / ENSITU

Courtesy of

Architects: ENSITU – Patrick Dillon
Location:
Client: Eugene Eisenmann Avifauna Foundation
Design/ Production Team: Brenda Gotti, Zitta Pozo, Aristides Robles, Emilio Rivadeneira
Structural Engineer: Arquinde. Martin Isaac, Luis McNulty
MEP: Luis Carlos Gotti
Area: Visitor’s Center- 150 sqm, Observation Tower- 32m height
Photographs: Sylvia Grunhut, Colibri Productions

Panama Hospital Competition Proposal / TASH

Courtesy of

The winning proposal for the new Hospital, designed by TASH, is based on the design of ecological protections and passive bioclimatic strategies. The project is configured as a city, it is in no way a single building but a complex, keeping the capacity of total intercommunication between different buildings in a way that benefits from the different synergies, general systems, logistics, production systems, waste disposal, etc, avoiding element duplicities and improving the general performance of the complex, thus giving sense to the concept of a hospital city that is at the core of the project. More images and architects’ description after the break.