Ole Bouman Appointed Director of V&A-Backed Shekou Design Museum

. Image © China Merchants Property Development / Maki and Associates

Ole Bouman, former director of the Netherlands Architecture Institute (NAi), has been appointed director of the new Victoria and Albert Museum-backed Shekou Design Museum in Shenzhen, China. Set to open at the end of 2016 in a Fumihiko Maki-designed building within the Sea World Arts and Culture Center, the new design museum aims to serve as an international platform for Chinese design. 

“We wanted to offer the local residents an internationally important museum that would help promote the development of China’s creative industries and further progress design in China,” stated China Merchants Group (CMG) vice president Sun Chengming. CMG is collaborating with London’s V&A to realize the project. 

More about Bouman’s appointment, after the break.

Wanda Movie Park / Stufish Entertainment Architects

Courtesy of

Architects: Stufish Entertainment Architects
Location: , Hubei, China
Area: 100000.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of Stufish Entertainment Architects

Han Show Theatre / Stufish Entertainment Architects

Courtesy of Stufish Entertainment Architects

Architects: Stufish Entertainment Architects
Location: , Hubei,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of Stufish Entertainment Architects

Office Around a Tree / Lukstudio

© Peter Dixie

Architects: Lukstudio
Location: , , China
Design Team: Christina Luk, Wesley Shu, Scott Baker, Mavis Li
Area: 133.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Peter Dixie

The Platform / Lukstudio

© Peter Dixie

Architects: Lukstudio
Location: Nan Jing Dong Lu, Huangpu Qu, Shi, China, 200085
Design Team: Christina Luk, Scott Baker, Wesley Shu
Area: 50.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Peter Dixie

Video: Mini-Documentary Profiles Artists Who Are Shunning China’s Urban Explosion

In 2011, China had more people living in urban areas than rural areas for the first time in its history, and recent government statistics show that around 300 villages disappear per day in . Yet in the face of rapid , a “back to land movement” is now also emerging. A new mini-documentary by Sun Yunfan and Leah Thompson, Down to the Countryside, looks at urban residents who, fed up with city life, are looking to revitalize the countryside, while preserving local tradition. The documentary follows Ou Ning, an artist and curator, who moved from Beijing to the village of Bishan, in Anhui province, in 2013. Ning considers himself part of China’s “new rural reconstruction movement,” and the documentary shows his quest to develop the rural economy and bring arts and culture to the countryside.

Learn more about the film on China File and check out an interview with the directors on CityLab.

Yangzhou Jade Workshop / Atelier Xuk

© Lv Hengzhong

Architects: Atelier Xuk
Location: Wantou Land Resources Institute, 783 Qin You Lu, Guangling Qu, , Jiangsu Sheng, , 225006
Project Team: Liukenan Zhangxu, Lujun Zengyahan, Chenruizhi Dongxiao
Area: 6500.0 ft2
Photographs: Lv Hengzhong

Aedas’ Huasha Plaza Set to Complete Next Year

©

Aedas has unveiled designs for a mixed-use development in , China. Planned for a scenic reserve area between Yunlong Mountain and Lake, “Huasha Plaza” hopes to minimize its footprint by acting as an extension to the surrounding landscape. Once complete in 2015, the project will be comprised of a hotel, residential, office and retail. Read on for more details.

Waterfront Restaurant / Pro-Form Architects

© LV Hengzhong

Architects: Pro-Form Architects
Location: 2801 Hu Yi Gong Lu, Jiading Qu, Shanghai Shi,
Architect In Charge: WU Jing, LI Peng, HE Ru of Limited
Area: 1500.0 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: LV Hengzhong

Reconfiguring Urban Spaces To Compensate For “Poisonous” Air

The CCTV Building, Beijing, cloaked by air . Image © Kevin Frayer / Getty Images

In an article for The Guardian, Oliver Wainwright steps “inside Beijing’s apocalypse”: the poisonous, polluted atmosphere that often clings to the Chinese capital. He explores ways in which those who live in this metropolis have started to redefine the spaces they frequent and the ways in which they live. Schools, he notes, are now building inflatable domes over play areas in order to “simulate a normal environment.” The dangers were made clear when ”this year’s Beijing marathon [...] saw many drop out when their face-mask filters turned a shade of grey after just a few kilometres.” Now, in an attempt to improve the living conditions in the city, ecologists and environmental scientists are proposing new methods to filter the air en masse. Read about some of the methods here.

Huishan North Bund / EE&K a Perkins Eastman Company

© Tim Griffith

Architects: EE&K
Location: Hongkou, ,
Area: 255000.0 sqm
Photographs: Tim Griffith, Courtesy of Perkins Eastman, Gary Wei

OMA Wins Competition for Shanghai Exhibition Center

Courtesy of OMA

OMA has won a competition to design the Lujiazui Exhibition Centre, a 1,500 square meter space in Shanghai  on the site of the former “ Shipyard.” The design aims to create a concentrated culture and event space within the surrounding financial district, on the edge of the Huangpu River, one of the most photographed waterfronts in the world.

More on the design after the break

ACE Cafe 751 / dEEP Architects

Architects: dEEP Architects
Location: , , China
Architect In Charge: LI Daode
Area: 600.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of dEEP

Encountering the “Weirdness” in China: A Talk with the Guangzhou Circle Architect Joseph di Pasquale

Courtesy of

Recently, lots of controversial “Jumbos” have been erected on mainland China, leading most of their creators, architects from Western countries, to be placed at the centre of public discussion. Furthermore, ’s President Xi Jinping’s recent comment about “no more weird buildings” has led the Chinese central government into this whirlpool. What can western landmark makers learn from all of this?

We met Joseph di Pasquale, architect of the Guangzhou Circle, in Milan some days after “weirdness” became the most used word in Chinese architecture. In the following edited talk with interviewer Yifan Zhang, the architect of the latest landmark in South China’s largest city discusses his new project, the real circumstances in China, and the future for foreign architects.

Student Bathrooms / Wuyang Architecture

© SU Shengliang

Architects:
Location: Jian Chuan Lu, Minhang Qu, Shi, China
Architect: FENG Lu
Engineering: SRIBS
Area: 503.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: SU Shengliang, Courtesy of Wuyang Architecture

Cipea Villa / Sanaksenaho Architects

© Tuomas Uusheimo

Architects: Sanaksenaho Architects
Location: , Jiangsu, China
Design Team: Matti Sanaksenaho,Pirjo Sanaksenaho, Jari Mänttäri, Maria Isotupa, Tommi Terästö, Jaana Hellinen
Structural Engineering: Tero Aaltonen +local engineers
Area: 800.0 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Tuomas Uusheimo

Passive House Bruck / Peter Ruge Architekten

© Jan Siefke

Architects: Peter Ruge Architekten
Location: Changxing, , Zhejiang,
Architect In Charge: Peter Ruge, Kayoko Uchiyama, Matthias Matschewski, Jan Müllender, Alejandra Pérez Siller, Duan Fu
Area: 2200.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Jan Siefke

Vanke Sales Center Façade Renovation / Shenzhen Upright & Pure Architectural Design Co., Ltd

Courtesy of Upright & Pure Architectural Design

Architects: Shenzhen Upright & Pure Architectural Design Co., Ltd.
Location: , Henan, China
Area: 4600.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of Shenzhen Upright & Pure Architectural Design