William McDonough + Partners

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William McDonough Unveils ICEhouse™, The Next Step in the Circular Economy

08:00 - 23 January, 2016
© Bertram Radelow, courtesy of William McDonough + Partners
© Bertram Radelow, courtesy of William McDonough + Partners

Designer William McDonough has unveiled the next step in cradle-to-cradle manufacturing: The Innovation for the Circular Economy house (ICEhouse) in Davos, Switzerland. The ICEhouse aims to show the “positive design framework described in the book Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, the sustainable development goals of the United Nations, and the reuse of resources implicit in the circular economy."

The house was used as a place of gathering and discussion for the World Economic Forum annual meeting. After being used for the week, the building will be disassembled and reconstructed elsewhere.

The Avant-Garde of Adaptive Reuse: How Design For Deconstruction is Reinventing Recycling

09:30 - 16 January, 2016
The NASA Sustainability Base, designed by William McDonough + Partners with AECOM was constructed based on Design for Deconstruction principles. Image © William McDonough + Partners
The NASA Sustainability Base, designed by William McDonough + Partners with AECOM was constructed based on Design for Deconstruction principles. Image © William McDonough + Partners

As an idea that was developed fairly early on in the movement for sustainability, and picked up significant traction a few years into the new millennium, "Design for Deconstruction" has been around for some years. Yet still, considered on the scale of building lifespans, the idea is still in its infancy, with few opportunities to test its principles. In this post originally published on Autodesk's Line//Shape//Space publication as "Recycled Buildings or Bridges? Designing for Deconstruction Beyond Adaptive Reuse," Timothy A Schuler looks at the advances that have been made, and the challenges that still face, the design for deconstruction movement.

This summer, the Oakland Museum of California announced a new public arts grant program. Except instead of money, selected artists would receive steel. Tons of it.

The Bay Bridge Steel Program emerged out of a desire to salvage and repurpose the metal that once made up the eastern span of San Francisco’s Bay Bridge, originally constructed in 1933 (it was replaced in 2013). The steel in question, sourced from “spans referred to as ‘504s’ and ‘288s’ (in reference to their length in feet),” according to the application material, would be available for civic and public art projects within the state of California.

The program represents a unique opportunity to adaptively reuse infrastructure, upcycling what might have been waste. And yet any instance of adaptive reuse is inherently reactive because the design process is dictated by an existing condition.

San Francisco’s Bay Bridge being dismantled for use in the Bay Bridge Steel Program. Image © Sam Burbank San Francisco’s Bay Bridge being dismantled for use in the Bay Bridge Steel Program. Image © Sam Burbank San Francisco’s Bay Bridge being dismantled for use in the Bay Bridge Steel Program. Image © Sam Burbank San Francisco’s Bay Bridge being dismantled for use in the Bay Bridge Steel Program. Image © Sam Burbank +9

Archiculture Interviews: Bill McDonough

14:00 - 27 March, 2015

"What I'm trying to look at is how do we make humans supportive of a natural world, in the way that the natural world is supportive of us?" In the latest installment of Arbuckle Industries' Archiculture interviews, architect, educator, environmentalist, and author Bill McDonough discusses some of the challenges and themes he has seen in our built environment. He focuses on environmentalism in architecture through the lens of carbon neutrality and the problems with that principle. He goes on to address some of his solutions, including a Cradle to Cradle design approach which changes the way environmental problems are tackled.

William McDonough Designs Ultra "Clean" Manufacturing Facility for Method

01:00 - 7 March, 2014
© William McDonough + Partners
© William McDonough + Partners

William McDonough + Partners has been selected to design Method’s first U.S. manufacturing facility on a brownfield site in Chicago’s historic Pullman community. The company, known for producing environmentally conscious cleaning products, commissioned McDonough to design an ultra clean, LEED Platinum facility constructed from Cradle to Cradle Certified materials and powered entirely by renewable energy. 

NASA Sustainability Base / William McDonough + Partners and AECOM

01:00 - 2 May, 2012
©  William McDonough + Partners
© William McDonough + Partners
  • Architects

  • Location

    Moffett Field, California
  • Architect of Record / Landscape Architect of Record / MEP / Structural / Civil Engineering

    AECOM
  • Landscape Architect

    Siteworks Studio
  • Daylighting / Lighting / Energy Consultant

    Loisos + Ubbelohde
  • Materials Assessment

    McDonough Braungart Design Chemistry
  • Client

    NASA Ames Research Center
  • Program

    Office Building
  • General Contractor

    Swinerton Builders
  • Area

    50000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2011
  • Photographs

©  William McDonough + Partners ©  William McDonough + Partners ©  William McDonough + Partners ©  William McDonough + Partners +18