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Cityförster to Lead Design of New Beijing Government District

12:00 - 12 June, 2017
Cityförster to Lead Design of New Beijing Government District, Courtesy of Cityförster
Courtesy of Cityförster

The multi-disciplinary team 'Wasser Hannover', Cityförster and the Chinese Academy for Urban Planning and Design (CAUPD) have been selected as the first prize winners in one of three initial competitions to design the new seat of government for the Chinese capital of Beijing. Part of a planned merging of Beijing with the surrounding cities of Tianjin and Hebei, the new government district will be located in Tongzhou, an existing district southeast of the city center.

The winning scheme follows a 'landscape-planning-based' concept that is organized through a holistic water and open-space system, responding to the ecological and technical needs of the government.

Courtesy of Cityförster Courtesy of Cityförster Courtesy of Cityförster Courtesy of Cityförster +5

House on Top / ISV Architects

11:00 - 12 June, 2017
House on Top / ISV Architects, © George Messaritakis
© George Messaritakis

© George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis +37

  • Architects

  • Location

    Filopappos Hill, Thisseio, Athens, Athina 104 38, Greece
  • Project Director

    Alexander Van Gilder
  • Project Architect

    George Atsalakis
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

Stood in Splendid Isolation, Questions Are Raised About Apple's Cupertino Campus

10:15 - 12 June, 2017
Stood in Splendid Isolation, Questions Are Raised About Apple's Cupertino Campus, © Apple
© Apple

The "Spaceship" has landed and the dust, it appears, is starting to settle. In an article by Adam Rogers, which follows Wired's exclusive breakdown of the new Apple Campus in Cupertino, Californiaa convincing case is put forward against its design and wider masterplan. "You can’t understand a building without looking at what’s around it," Rogers argues – and most, including its architects, Foster+Partners, would surely be inclined to agree.

Whether you call it the Ring (too JRR Tolkien), the Death Star (too George Lucas), or the Spaceship (too Buckminster Fuller), something has alighted in Cupertino. And no one could possibly question the elegance of its design and architecture. This building is $5 billion and 2.8 million square feet of Steve Jobsian-Jony Ivesian-Norman Fosterian genius.

How 7 Dictators Used Buildings to Influence and Intimidate

09:30 - 12 June, 2017
How 7 Dictators Used Buildings to Influence and Intimidate

Architecture is political. While this irks some of us and energizes others, even consciously choosing not to think of buildings politically is taking a political stance. In this way, there is no escape from the politics of architecture and many governments and powerful figures throughout history have embraced the political nature of architecture and used it to further their motives. The construction of buildings is among the clearest and most obvious visual indicators of a society’s power and economic standing, so for a new government trying to project power and prosperity, for example, architecture can be the quickest and most incontrovertible way for the government to show its success. While many dictatorships rely on more intangible strategies as well, like propaganda and the creation of a cult of personality, examining a regime’s approach to architecture can be telling of its values. 

A dictator’s relationship and approach to architecture as a strategic move (or lack thereof) is the first indication of the leadership’s beliefs and goals for a country. Does this government want to develop and build the country or tear it down to its roots? The style of the architecture created under a dictatorship is significant as well, as it is often used to convey a message in alignment with the government’s politics or to imply a sense of power and grandeur. Lastly, the types of buildings prioritized by a regime clearly illustrate its primary interests and goals—a government that focuses on building schools and hospitals sends a different message than one that primarily builds prisons and fortresses. Below is a list of historical dictatorships and their approaches to architecture while in power, from which we can draw connections and conclusions about the governments themselves and see how architecture fed into their overall ideologies.

Värtan Bioenergy CHP-plant / UD Urban Design AB + Gottlieb Paludan Architects

09:00 - 12 June, 2017
Värtan Bioenergy CHP-plant / UD Urban Design AB + Gottlieb Paludan Architects, © Robin Hayes
© Robin Hayes

© Robin Hayes © Robin Hayes © Robin Hayes © Robin Hayes +29

The Most Popular Architecture Offices on Facebook

08:00 - 12 June, 2017
The Most Popular Architecture Offices on Facebook

Social media is one of the most critical elements for a successful marketing strategy. For architecture firms, the bounty of online platforms supporting visual content can allow ideas, commissions, and buildings to reach millions of architecture lovers around the world with a single click.

Since its launch in 2004, Facebook has proven to be an enduring platform for sharing architectural ideas, with even ArchDaily taking the decision in February to make Facebook a primary avenue for reader comments. Below, we have rounded up the 20 architecture firms worldwide with the most Facebook followers, demonstrating how a well-maintained, engaging presence on social media can allow architectural ideas to be spread to millions of enthusiasts. Are you following all of them?

AD Classics: Haus am Horn / Georg Muche

07:00 - 12 June, 2017
AD Classics: Haus am Horn / Georg Muche, Courtesy of Freundeskreis der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar e. V.. Image © Cameron Blaylock
Courtesy of Freundeskreis der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar e. V.. Image © Cameron Blaylock

In 1919, at a time in which Germany was still in upheaval over its defeat in the First World War (and compounded by the loss of its monarchy), the Academy of Fine Arts and School of Applied Arts in Weimar, Germany, were combined to form the first Bauhaus. Its stated goal was to erase the separation that had developed between artists and craftsmen, combining the talents of both occupations in order to achieve a unified architectonic feeling which they believed had been lost in the divide. Students of the Bauhaus were to abandon the framework of design standards that had been developed by traditional European schools and experiment with natural materials, abstract forms, and their own intuitions. Although the school’s output was initially Expressionist in nature, by 1922 it had evolved into something more in line with the rising International Style.[1]

Courtesy of Freundeskreis der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar e. V.. Image © Cameron Blaylock Courtesy of Freundeskreis der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar e. V.. Image © Cameron Blaylock Courtesy of Freundeskreis der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar e. V.. Image © Cameron Blaylock A direct line of sight from the children’s room (in the foreground) to the kitchen allowed for a mother to keep watch over her children without the aid of a servant. ImageCourtesy of Freundeskreis der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar e. V. +14

A Selection of Impressive Perspective Sections

06:00 - 12 June, 2017
A Selection of Impressive Perspective Sections, First Place XVIII CAP 2014 Contest, Social Housing of Average Height / USACH. Courtesy of Team 160
First Place XVIII CAP 2014 Contest, Social Housing of Average Height / USACH. Courtesy of Team 160

The perspective section is an increasingly popular form of architectural representation, one that is most commonly used in architectural competitions since it allows a technical drawing to be mixed with an image, a section which allows one to easily express the qualities of the space designed in a two-dimensional drawing. Below, we have put together a selection of impressive perspective sections ranging from a realistic aesthetic to a line drawing by hand.

Courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro Courtesy of Maricarmen Comas, Fernando Vignoni, Diego Cherbenco and Jonathan Tyszberowicz Courtesy of Sebastián Bravo, Miguel Casassus and Raúl Pacheco Courtesy of MF&MT Arquitectos +13

MAMI House / NoArq

05:00 - 12 June, 2017
MAMI House / NoArq, © João Morgado
© João Morgado

© João Morgado © João Morgado © João Morgado © João Morgado +39

  • Arquitetos

  • Location

    Matosinhos, Portugal
  • Author

    José Carlos Nunes de Oliveira
  • Area

    162.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Open Call: The Best Student Design-Build Projects

04:00 - 12 June, 2017
Open Call: The Best Student Design-Build Projects

It's graduation time. As universities around the globe—or at least most in the Northern hemisphere, where over 80% of the world's universities are located—come to the end of the academic year, many university architecture studios have recently closed out the construction of pavilions, installations, and other small educational projects. For the third straight yearArchDaily is calling on recently-graduated readers to submit their projects for our round-up of the best pavilions, installations and experimental structures created by students from all over the world.

Once again, we're teaming up with all of ArchDaily en Español, ArchDaily Brasil, and ArchDaily China, in the hope that we can present the best work from graduating students worldwide to a worldwide audience. Read on to find out how you can take part.

Mountain House / Studio Razavi architecture

03:00 - 12 June, 2017
Mountain House / Studio Razavi architecture, © Olivier Martin Gambier
© Olivier Martin Gambier

© Olivier Martin Gambier © Olivier Martin Gambier © Simone Bossi © Olivier Martin Gambier +90

Be Open / Atelier d’Architecture Brenac-Gonzalez

02:00 - 12 June, 2017
Be Open / Atelier d’Architecture Brenac-Gonzalez, © Ştefan Tuchilă
© Ştefan Tuchilă

© Ştefan Tuchilă  © Ştefan Tuchilă  © Sergio Grazia     © Ştefan Tuchilă  +47

d+k House / buck&simple

20:00 - 11 June, 2017
d+k House / buck&simple, © Simon Whitbread
© Simon Whitbread

© Simon Whitbread © Simon Whitbread © Simon Whitbread d+k House / buck&simple +19

Power to the Bower: A Bird’s Architectural Method of Seduction

16:00 - 11 June, 2017
Power to the Bower: A Bird’s Architectural Method of Seduction , Courtesy of Flickr User Will Brown, licensed under CC BY 2.0
Courtesy of Flickr User Will Brown, licensed under CC BY 2.0

Think your decked-out bachelor pad is the slickest on the block? Think again. That reputation now resides in the carefully constructed abode of the bowerbird, which transforms the art of building into the art of seduction. Native to Australia and New Guinea, the bowerbird dedicates months to construct elaborate woven nests, known as bowers, as a means of attracting mates in one of nature’s most unique courting rituals.

6 Endangered World Heritage Sites as Seen from Space

14:00 - 11 June, 2017
6 Endangered World Heritage Sites as Seen from Space, Samarra Archaeological City, Iraq. Image © Deimos Imaging
Samarra Archaeological City, Iraq. Image © Deimos Imaging

Born between the Tigris and the Euphrates, ancient Mesopotamia, "the land between two rivers," is considered the cradle of human civilization or, at least, one of its main birthplaces. Archaeological discoveries place in this fertile crescent the earliest origins of agriculture, the birth of writing and the first religions, governments and social orders.

This historical land corresponds to most of the current Iraq and Kuwait, as well as to smaller parts of Syria, Turkey and Iran. Not only these countries, but the whole Middle East in general, is home to invaluable ancient treasures. However, a great number of the cultural sites there are faced with major threats, as they have been caught up in the middle of ongoing conflicts that are ravaging the region. As a consequence, UNESCO included several sites in the List of World Heritage in Danger, in the hope that the international community could join in an effort to save these endangered properties.

To reinforce this message, the Earth Observation company Deimos Imaging has released satellite images of six World Heritage sites in danger in Syria, Iraq and Yemen. The images were captured by the satellite Deimos-2, launched in 2014 and designed for cost-effective, dependable very-high-resolution Earth Observation applications, providing 75cm/pixel pan-sharpened images.

Casa del Abuelo / Taller DIEZ 05

13:00 - 11 June, 2017
Casa del Abuelo / Taller DIEZ 05, © Luis Gordoa
© Luis Gordoa

© Luis Gordoa © Luis Gordoa © Luis Gordoa © Luis Gordoa +28

  • Architects

  • Location

    Córdoba, Veracruz, México
  • Architect in Charge

    Manuel Herrera Gil
  • Collaborators

    LP-Francisco Dorado, Juan Rodríguez.
  • Area

    780.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

The New Yorker Cartoon That Accompanied the Opening of Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim

12:00 - 11 June, 2017
Courtesy of <a href='http://www.newyorker.com/'>The New Yorker</a>
Courtesy of The New Yorker

From wonderment to disgust, the opening of Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1959 was met with a wide range of reactions from the public. This profound cultural moment was distilled in a series of witty cartoons published in the New Yorker that simultaneously lampooned both the innovative architecture and its critics, which were recently shared in a blog post by the Guggenheim Museum. Through detailed sketches, cartoonist Alan Dunn represents the experience of the building, from staring into the exterior porthole windows to walking around the grand ramp. In one drawing he depicts the perspective from the first floor looking up at the dome, giving a sweeping sense of the curvature and geometries of the building.

19 Emerging Firms Design Prototype Houses for Living Among Nature

11:30 - 11 June, 2017

As the boundary that separates work and leisure in the 21st Century continues to be blurred by technology, architects Christoph Hesse and Neeraj Bhatia sought out to uncover a tranquil solution. The pair are co-curating an upcoming exhibition at the Kulturbahnhof Kassel in Germany as part of Experimenta Urbana in a show called “Ways of Life,” which opens July 5th.

This international initiative seeks to discover “a new nomaticism.” A gathering of 19 emerging architecture offices each presents a dwelling encompassed in nature. These buildings are often equal parts project and manifesto. The show’s overarching theme is the delicate balance of naturally induced relaxation and programmatically encouraged productivity. Each firm must additionally consider constraints that include limited square footage, integration of rapidly advancing information technology, and a strictly sustainable design.

Courtesy of  Boris Bernaskoni Courtesy of DOGMA Courtesy of RICA Courtesy of The Open Workshop +79