Nakagin Capsule Tower, Tokyo. Image © Arcspace
Nakagin Capsule Tower, Tokyo. Image © Arcspace

Spotlight: Kisho Kurokawa

Kisho Kurokawa (April 8th 1934 – October 12th 2007) was one of Japan‘s leading architects of the 20th century, perhaps most well-known as one of the founders of the Metabolist movement of the 1960s. Throughout the course of his career Kurokawa advocated a philosophical approach to understanding architecture that was manifest in his completed projects throughout his life.

Harumi Residential Tower / Richard Meier & Partners Architects

© Ishiguro Photographic Institute

Architects: Richard Meier & Partners Architects
Location: ,
Design Partners: Richard Meier, Dukho Yeon
Project Architect: Carlo Balestri
Area: 196200.0 sqm
Year: 2015
Photographs: Ishiguro Photographic Institute

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the 2014 Venice Biennale

The Architecture Of Death

At the 2014 Venice Biennale, away from the concentrated activity of the Arsenale and Giardini, was Death in Venice: one of the few independent projects to take root that year. The exhibition was curated by and Ania Molenda, who worked alongside LUST graphic designers. It saw the hospitals, cemeteries, crematoria and hospices of London interactively mapped creating, as Gian Luca Amadei put it, an overview of the capital’s “micro-networks of death.” Yet it also revealed a larger message: that architecture related to death and dying appears to no longer be important to the development of architecture as a discipline.

Early Childhood Center / a+ samueldelmas architects urbanistes

© Julien Lanoo

Architects: a+ samueldelmas architects urbanistes
Location: ,
Client: Ville d’Asnières sur Seine
Budget: 3,4M euros HT
Area: 1200.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Julien Lanoo, Courtesy of a+ samueldelmas

Billboard / +S/Shintaro Matsushita+Takashi Suzuki + knit/Naohito Ikuta

© Hiroyuki Hirai

Architects: +S/Shintaro Matsushita+Takashi Suzuki
Location: , Mie Prefecture, Japan
Interior Design: knit/Naohito Ikuta
Construction: Ohno Construction Company
Area: 442.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Hiroyuki Hirai

Customi-Zip / L’EAU design

© Park Wan-soon

Architects: L’EAU design
Location: 416-4 Gwacheon-dong, , Gyeonggi-do, South
Architect In Charge: Dongjin Kim
Area: 560.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Park Wan-soon

House in Ningyo-cho / K+S Architects

© Hiroshi Ueda

Architects: K+S Architects
Location: Chuo, Tokyo,
Architects In Charge: Nobuya Kashima, Aya Sato
Area: 54.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Hiroshi Ueda

Cooroy Studio / JMA Architects

© Peter Hyatt

Architects: JMA Architects
Location: Cooroy QLD 4563,
Project Team: John Mainwaring, Paolo Denti, Tom Kanchanasinith, Garth Hollindale
Year: 2008
Photographs: Peter Hyatt

Video: Jørn Utzon’s Nature-Inspired Sydney Opera House

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Sydney Opera House recently created a video exploring how Jørn Utzon was inspired by the form and function of nature. While Jørn Utzon may not have seen himself as a pioneer of sustainable techniques, was inherent in his design philosophy. Watch the video above to learn more. 

Chrysalis Childcare Centre / Collingridge and Smith Architects

Courtesy of

Architects: Collingridge and Smith Architects
Location: , New Zealand
Architect In Charge: Phil Smith, Graham Collingridge, Evan Crighton
Area: 800.0 sqm
Year: 2015
Photographs: Courtesy of Collingridge and Smith Architects

David Chipperfield Disowns Milan’s Museum of Culture Over “Floor War”

© Oskar Da Riz Fotografie via MUDEC

The poor quality and laying of stone flooring in Milan‘s newly completed Museum of Culture has led its architect, David Chipperfield to dissociate himself with the building. Blasting officials for skimping on materials, the British architect is demanding his name be removed from the project, claiming the building is now a “museum of horrors” and a “pathetic end to 15 years of work” due to the low quality flooring. 

On the contrary, ’s council says the material decision was made in the “interests of the taxpayers,” further claiming that, according to councillor Filippo del Corno, Chipperfield has been “unreasonable and impossible to please.” 

Residential Building in Vase Stajića Street / Kuzmanov and Partners

© Miljan Cvijetić

Architects: Kuzmanov and Partners
Location: , Serbia
Architects In Charge: Lazar Kuzmanov, Miljan Cvijetić
Area: 3190.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Miljan Cvijetić

Sou Fujimoto-Led Team Selected to Design Ecole Polytechnique Learning Centre in Paris

Courtesy of Sou Fujimoto Architects, and Nicolas Laisné Associates

With an idea based on “flexibility, mingling and openness,” Sou Fujimoto Architects, Manal Rachdi OXO Architects and Nicolas Laisné Associates have been announced as winners of a restricted competition to design a new Ecole Polytechnique learning center at -Saclay University. The winning scheme, chosen over four finalists, will consolidate six institutions under one roof: Ecole Polytechnique, Institut Mines-Telecom, AgroParisTech, ENSTA ParisTech, ENSAE ParisTech and Institut d’Optique (IOGS).

José Macedo Fragateiro Secondary School / Atelier d’Arquitectura J. A. Lopes da Costa

© Manuel Aguiar

Architects: Atelier d’Arquitectura J. A. Lopes da Costa
Location: ,
Architect In Charge: José António Lopes da Costa, Tiago Meireles
Co Workers: Rita Gonçalves, Filipe Ribeiro, Joana Jorge
Engineering: TERMOPROJECTO
Year: 2010
Photographs: Manuel Aguiar

Mark Zuckerberg Praises Frank Gehry: “He’s Very Efficient”

Early building model inside the completed headquarters. Image Image via Mark Zuckerberg

After Facebook began its move into its new Frank Gehry-designed headquarters last week, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has praised his architect for his work. In a post on his personal Facebook page yesterday, Zuckerberg shares the story of how Gehry he initially turned down Gehry’s request to design the project, saying that “even though we all loved his architecture… We figured he would be very expensive and that would send the wrong signal about our culture.”

But Frank Gehry persisted, saying that he would match any bids the company received. As a result, Zuckerberg has now praised Gehry – in a somewhat uncharacteristic description of the architect – for being “very efficient.”

Read Zuckerberg’s full statement, after the break.

VITRA / Studio Daniel Libeskind + Pablo Slemenson Arquitetura

© Marcelo Scarpis

Architects: Studio Daniel Libeskind, Pablo Slemenson Arquitetura
Location: Avenida Horácio Lafer, 500 – Itaim Bibi, São Paulo – SP, 04538-082,
Area: 14850.0 sqm
Year: 2015
Photographs: Marcelo Scarpis, Courtesy of Pablo Slemenson

How Digital Design Review Enabled One of the Fastest US Hospital Builds

Courtesy of Bluebeam

Designing and building an 831,000 square foot in 30 months is no easy feat. In fact, the Denver Saint Joseph Hospital project, owned by SCL Health Systems, is actually one of the fastest hospital builds ever completed in the US. Innovative methods of design, construction and collaboration among project partners throughout all phases of the project — from planning to construction — were critical for the team to open the hospital doors on time.

“The document management was tough—a million square feet of anything is going to generate a lot of documentation,” said Dale Clingner, an associate with Davis Partnership Architects, who partnered with H+L Architecture and ZGF Architects on the project, which was built by Mortenson Construction. To avoid the type of document management confusion that could slow progress, all project partners established a tacitly agreed-upon BIM execution plan and decided to incorporate digital design review in live collaborative sessions to successfully meet the condensed timeline on or under budget.

For and Against All-Nighter Culture: ArchDaily Readers Respond

Forrest Jessee’s Sleep Suit. Image © Forrest Jessee

Nearly three weeks ago, the editors at ArchDaily reached out to our readers to help us investigate one of the most difficult challenges of architecture education: what do and teachers think of the 24-hour studio culture that has come to pervade the architecture profession? As we mentioned in our original post, the idea that all-nighters are simply an unavoidable part of an education in architecture has come under fire recently, with some schools attempting to combat them by closing their studios overnight. Is this the right approach to reducing the hours that are (over)working? If not, what should be done instead? Perhaps there are some people that still think a 24-hour culture can be beneficial to young architects?

The response we got to our question was astonishing, with 141 comments on the article itself and over 100 more on our Facebook post. From this discussion, two overriding themes emerged: firstly, many commenters seemed to believe that architecture students have too much work in the first place; secondly, there was almost complete consensus that closing the studios achieves nothing but moving the problem of all-nighters from the studio to students’ homes. For the sake of brevity we’ve chosen not to include the many responses that mention these themes ideas in this post, but for anyone interested in seeing the evidence of these opinions, we encourage you to visit the original article.

As for the remainder of the comments, we’ve rounded up some of the most interesting contributions. Find out what 15 commenters had to say about the 24-hour studio culture – taking in arguments for and against it as well as discussing its wider consequences and ways to avoid it – after the break.