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  6. ZAAD and Challenge Studio Propose New Tower for Iranian City of Mashhad

ZAAD and Challenge Studio Propose New Tower for Iranian City of Mashhad

ZAAD and Challenge Studio Propose New Tower for Iranian City of Mashhad
ZAAD and Challenge Studio Propose New Tower for Iranian City of Mashhad, © ZAAD Studio; Challenge Studio
© ZAAD Studio; Challenge Studio

ZAAD Studio has teamed up with Challenge Studio to envision a new residential typology for Mashhad, Iran. The 40,000-square-meter tower is designed to incorporate passive green energy strategies and emulate a "small town" feel. It's distinct shape, based on a philosophy of "void design," resulted from the desire to exchange built program for share green space that will enhance interaction between dwellers. 

© ZAAD Studio; Challenge Studio
© ZAAD Studio; Challenge Studio

From the architects: Vandad Ecologic Tower was commissioned by an affluent developer from the city of Mashad, in Iran; who has recently become interested in incorporating passive green energy strategies to his development portfolio. Originating from a small town himself, the client stipulated that Vandad Ecologic Towers must implement elements of small-town lifestyle in the design.

© ZAAD Studio; Challenge Studio
© ZAAD Studio; Challenge Studio

By analyzing broader problems of urban planning and architectural design which directly influence modern city life, this proposal attempts to identify and embody those attributes of a more sustainable, environmentally conscious, civic lifestyle that were such an intrinsically influential factor in many of our predecessors’ predominantly non-urbanized childhoods. The rigid appropriation of space and spatial ownership has become an accepted aspect of modern urban living, where interaction with the environment and neighboring inhabitants has been minimized to include only that which exists within ownership boundaries. This dramatically reduces what would formerly be a natural sense of responsibility towards society and towards the environment. This proposal attempts to reintroduce a sense of identity into the modern urban paradigm, by investing in community and the natural environment, and encouraging intercommunication through a network of shared green spaces aimed at heightening the quality of life as well as mutual civic dependency.

© ZAAD Studio; Challenge Studio
© ZAAD Studio; Challenge Studio
© ZAAD Studio; Challenge Studio
© ZAAD Studio; Challenge Studio

The development strategy is based on a philosophy of void design in which subtracted space is literally an addition of shared green spaces which promotes interaction and communication. This method of subtraction creates a green valley between two facing and connected towers, where the tending of the gardens on one tower is ultimately contributing to the vista of the other tower. An austere external facade conforms to the surrounding urban context by respecting the dominant urban facade and skyline, while the building interior diverges into a network of interconnected micro-spaces resulting in -not so much a vertical city, but a vertical village. 

© ZAAD Studio; Challenge Studio
© ZAAD Studio; Challenge Studio
Cite: Karissa Rosenfield. "ZAAD and Challenge Studio Propose New Tower for Iranian City of Mashhad" 29 Dec 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/779612/zaad-and-challenge-studio-propose-new-tower-for-iranian-city-of-mashhad/>
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7 Comments

Marsellus W. · January 07, 2016

Ignoring the text and just looking at the floor plans and dthe renderings made me appreciate this effort a bit more; I agree that this kind of parametric Dutch-ish "story-telling"-architecture is a) out of fashion b) was never more than an elaborate joke, ignoring the genius loci comletely c) is really hard to digest if you think you had to live next to it, and d) let's not mention the way this shape needs to be insulated and engineered. But, if you really want to go down this rabbit hole, this might just be one of the more sensible designs.

Gregory Kennerly · December 31, 2015

The "philosophy of void design" is disturbing to me: jagged edges that make the building appear to be either shot through by cannon fire or damaged by some terrible tectonic event. Unsettling to look at and probably worse to live in.

Benm · December 31, 2015

Uncanny how similar the concept is to:

http://www.archdaily.com/77928...

David O · December 30, 2015

So how does 24 levels and 40k sqm ever "feel" like a small town? Worst press release and lamest design manifesto ever.

this_is_silly · December 29, 2015

The building shadows its gardens, defeating their 'green' design!

Reder!c · December 29, 2015

The homogeneity of contemporary architecture is suffocating. This is for Mashhad, Iran, but it could just as easily be for Indonesia, Indiana, or Islington. There is nothing specifically Persian about it. Sad.

Taneli000 · December 29, 2015

I would not call this as new residential typology but individual sculptural landmark with a residential function.

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