ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

h

Nominate now the Building of the Year 2017 »

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Projects
  3. Houses
  4. United States
  5. Studio 27 Architecture
  6. 2010
  7. Rincon | Bates House / Studio 27 Architecture

Rincon | Bates House / Studio 27 Architecture

  • 01:00 - 14 June, 2010
Rincon | Bates House / Studio 27 Architecture
Rincon | Bates House / Studio 27 Architecture, © Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ
© Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ

© Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ © Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ © Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ © Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ +18

From the architect. The R|B House is a re-conceptualization of an end row house unit in Capitol Hill, Washington DC. The project furthers a continuing exploration in sustainable urban residential design. The existing two-story structure was originally built in 1906 and represents the archetype of single family dwelling units in the city. The house had been renovated in the early 1970’s, but the interior space remained a series of compartmentalized programmed rooms reminiscent of more traditional lifestyles.

© Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ
© Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ

The owners approached Studio 27 with an open ended request, the only stipulations being a re-configuration of the existing circulation pattern and thoughtful consideration for the ecological impact of the project. The scope of work evolved through an investigation of sectional manipulations focusing on apertures, daylight and natural ventilation.

© Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ
© Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ

The Architects strategy displaced the dark, musty interior with a sense of openness, both in plan and section, to create a more implicit series of relationships between traditionally separated hierarchical programs. Studio 27 removed a section of the second level floor joists to carve a void through the middle of the house over the dining room, enabling shared light between all spaces, and introduced operable skylights to create a per formative stack effect to control ventilation.

© Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ
© Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ

The second floor is divided into two bedroom suites, connected by a tubular steel and glass bridge that further contrasts with the heaviness of the existing masonry. Energy and water consumption are additionally minimized through the use of tank less gas-powered water heaters, new low E glass windows and doors, bio-based insulation, low-flow plumbing fixtures and dual flush wall hung toilets, and all interior finishes are domestically resourced recycled and formaldehyde-free to improve indoor air quality. As a result, the ’Open’ House represents the non-traditional urban sustainable lifestyle.

© Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ
© Anice Hoachlander / Allan Russ
Cite: "Rincon | Bates House / Studio 27 Architecture" 14 Jun 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/64165/rincon-bates-house-studio-27-architecture/>
Read comments

7 Comments

hungk15kt · February 09, 2011

i like it!!!

majchers · November 23, 2010

Incredible! A true marvel! I love it! Cheating ;-) but in what a style! Bravo!

sweetloveableblog · July 12, 2010

RT @loopci_com: Rincon | Bates House / Studio 27 Architecture | ArchDaily http://goo.gl/xJz4

K · June 18, 2010

What can i say, sometimes money does bring happiness, hehehe...

2 blocks away from the White House, excellent location.

Richard @ LOOP LTD · June 17, 2010

Rincon | Bates House / Studio 27 Architecture | ArchDaily http://goo.gl/xJz4

Nicholas Patten · June 16, 2010

I&#39d Live Here: Bates House. http://bit.ly/dutLk7

Andrew · June 16, 2010

Love it. Skylight makes this a viable design for a non end unit row house too no? Loss of a bedroom is the only downside. Great job.

···

Comments are closed

Read comments