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  1. ArchDaily
  2. Projects
  3. Cultural Center
  4. New Caledonia
  5. Renzo Piano
  6. 1998
  7. AD Classics: Centre Culturel Jean-Marie Tjibaou / Renzo Piano

AD Classics: Centre Culturel Jean-Marie Tjibaou / Renzo Piano

AD Classics: Centre Culturel Jean-Marie Tjibaou / Renzo Piano
AD Classics: Centre Culturel Jean-Marie Tjibaou / Renzo Piano, © Flickr user Fourrure
© Flickr user Fourrure

Sydney. Bilbao. Nouméa? They are cities recognized, popularized, and revitalized by a single foreign intervention of modern architecture. The phenomenon by which this occurs, often dubbed the “Bilbao Effect” in reference to Frank Gehry’s iconic museum, is one of the most fascinating and sought-after contributions of modern architecture to economic development.

The latter of these locations—the capital of the Pacific island cluster of New Caledonia—may seem a misfit on this list to those who have still not heard of it, now sixteen years after the completion of Renzo Piano’s Tjibaou Cultural Center, but it most certainly is not: the transformative economic effect of this project on the city of Nouméa has been no less dramatic than that of any opera house or museum of greater renown. Since the Center's completion, New Caledonia has found itself in the international architectural spotlight, as the graceful, ephemeral design of the building's iconic shells has brought fame and business in equal parts to its island and to Piano’s firm.

© Flickr user xyotiogyo © Flickr user Eustaquio © Flickr user saturnino Plan +12

Whether the New Caledonian government ever intended such to bring so much attention to the island became largely irrelevant after they selected Piano as the winner of an invite-only international competition in 1991. Its objective was to solicit ideas for a center that would celebrate the Kanak culture native to New Caledonia, and in the process, smooth over ethnic tensions that had been chronically deteriorating between the Kanak people and the island’s other inhabitants. That it would orchestrate an international talent search to recognize its local culture was a source of irony and criticism, made even more poignant by the historically strained relationship between the Kanaks and the ever-encroaching influence of modernization.

© Flickr user bectrynes
© Flickr user bectrynes

At the core of the commission's purpose was the long, complex, and often confrontational history between the Kanak people and New Caledonia’s European-descended rulers. The island of Grande Terre, which was colonized by French settlers early in the nineteenth century, had endured nearly two centuries of natural resource exploitation, cultural oppression, and long periods of Kanak enslavement. In the late twentieth century, the island underwent a protracted and varyingly bloody independence movement on behalf of the Kanak people led in part by Jean-Marie Tjibaou, for whom the Center is named, until his assassination in 1989. It was in this context that the project was conceived as a long-overdue recognition to a marginalized culture and given funding by the French government. [1]

Politics aside, however, it is easy to understand what the jury saw in Piano’s elegant design and how it became an object of esteemed international recognition. Sensitively using traditional Kanak chiefs’ houses as a starting point, the architects manipulated and deconstructed their form to create a monumental sequence of rounded, airy shells. Ten of them stretch along the hillside, varying in height from 20 to 28 meters and casting a commanding presence over the Pacific shoreline. Within and between them, a carefully choreographed procession of museum spaces takes visitors on a journey that weaves back and forth between intimate indoor enclosures and the surrounding island landscape.

© Flickr user tim-waters
© Flickr user tim-waters
Interior of a Kanak Chief's Hut. Image © Flickr user Eustaquio
Interior of a Kanak Chief's Hut. Image © Flickr user Eustaquio

Like the Kanak architects before them, Piano’s concept emphasizes the influence of site and environment as determinants of design and performance. The form of the shells negotiates a blend of traditional construction methods and a tapered, dematerializing profile that beautifully plays off the texture of the surrounding trees. Exterior voids worked into the plan and fenestrations in the building envelopes physically open the project to the site and deepen the inhabitants’ sense of place. An intelligent passive ventilation system removes the need for air conditioning, making the building’s clean, natural air supply an experiential part of the Center’s design. Even the interrelationship of building clusters, arranged in a layout similar to the grand allée plan of traditional Kanak villages, is dependent on a continuous stream of movement between enclosed and exterior spaces. [2]

© Flickr user saturnino
© Flickr user saturnino

The effect is organic and eye-catching. A beautiful incompleteness about the shells illicits seemingly paradoxical perceptions of a work-in-progress and a work-in-ruins that is nevertheless deeply satisfying. Idealistically, perhaps these incomplete geometries reflect the sentiment that Kanak culture is continuing to grow and evolve from ancient roots, even as new conditions require it to adapt its form.

Plan
Plan
Section
Section
Preliminary Plan/Elevation Composite Drawing
Preliminary Plan/Elevation Composite Drawing

Yet, for all of the contextual sensitivities of the architects, inevitable inconsistencies pervade the design. A fundamental disconnect between the technological sophistication of the structures and the traditional craftsmanship exhibited within them illustrates a conceptual problem that undermines the Center’s tenuous sense of heritage and identity. This is an unintended but nevertheless fitting theme given the commission’s complex political context, and one that is never completely resolved through architecture. It has been proposed that the Center’s technology acts as a mediator between conflicting cultural messages, design impulses, and systemic objectives [3], but this is likely only an optimistic reading of an irresolvable and somewhat distracting conflict.

© Flickr user xyotiogyo
© Flickr user xyotiogyo

The technological-traditional disconnect is one facet of a larger Framptonian tension between local and global identity that is all too familiar to the Kanak people. While the Center’s form is abstractly beautiful and environmentally thoughtful, it is unavoidably alien to the local culture of New Caledonia, as are the architects and the building tradition to which they belong. Even the materials from which the shells are made, intended to resemble the natural material palette of traditional Kanak architecture, were imported to the island for the project. For a culture searching for its place in an increasingly hostile and globalized world, it can find little solace for this problem in its new home, no matter how spectacular and otherwise successful its architecture may be.

© Flickr user Fourrure
© Flickr user Fourrure

Ultimately, these unresolved sociopolitical issues may be the price of the “Bilbao Effect," wherein even the greatest and most celebrated foreign designs cannot completely bridge the gap between the architectural standards of international competitions and the sense of regional appropriateness so demandingly required by cultural centers. Yet, to say that Renzo Piano's effort at Nouméa is admirable would be a serious understatement; as an example of formal creativity and technological skill, the Center is no less than one of the finest and most advanced projects of its time.

© Flickr user Eustaquio
© Flickr user Eustaquio

[1] Fondazione Renzo Piano. "Story - Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Center." Accessed 9 Sept. 2014 from http://www.fondazionerenzopiano.org/project/85/jean-marie-tjibaou-cultural-center/genesis/.

[2] Losche, Diane. “Memory, Violence and Representation in the Tjibaou Cultural Centre, New Caledonia.” In Stanley, Nick, ed. The Future of Indigenous Museums: Perspectives from the Southwest Pacific. United States: Berghahn Books, 2007.

[3] Frosten, Susan. “Technology as Mediator: The Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Center, New Caledonia.” Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review, Vol. 14, No. 1. Fall 2002: p. 23.

  • Architects

  • Location

    Rue des accords de Mantignon
  • Area

    8550.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    1998
  • Photographs

    Flickr user Fourrure, Flickr user xyotiogyo, Flickr user Eustaquio, Flickr user saturnino, Flickr user bectrynes, Flickr user tim-waters
Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Cite: David Langdon. "AD Classics: Centre Culturel Jean-Marie Tjibaou / Renzo Piano" 04 Aug 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/600641/ad-classics-centre-culturel-jean-marie-tjibaou-renzo-piano/>
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3 Comments

PetC · August 06, 2015

In a way, the architect exploited pieces of Kanak cultural (mostly architectural) heritage to build his own piece international-styled architecture (and a top quality one, by international standards), in a situation where the French republic, who has exploited New Caledonia for centuries, tried to make a social-political impact and "give something to the Kanak people" in the wake of an upcoming independence referendum. Pretty twisted.

Boguslaw Witkowski · August 05, 2015

So nice! Excellent
project. The proof that it has been copied many times even by some talented young architects. For example in the International Design Competition for the Thu Thiem Area in Ho Chi Minh City:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com...

https://www.google.be/search?q...

The reel on architecture · August 05, 2015

That is the strangest interpretation of another country's architectural vernacular. While they built it in a certain way bc of functionality and availability of material. What is he building this way for? Architects... you don't have to try so hard to be different all the time. He could have built just like them and let the program drive the uniqueness.

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