Suresnes Museum of Urban and Social History / Encore Heureux + AAVP

© Cyrus Cornut

Architects: Encore Heureux + AAVP
Location: Place de la Gare de Longchamp, 92150 , France
Architect In Charge: , AAVP
Year: 2014
Photographs: Cyrus Cornut, Luc Boegly

Floor Plan 1

From the architect. A coloured concrete monolith extends the existing station to host the MUS, the town’s museum of urban and social history. The extension forms the foundation for the station, with its smooth, slightly tilted façade unfolding and running up to the surrounding retaining walls.

© Cyrus Cornut

The station has been preserved in its original form, and the new foundation creates a space for a raised terrace which can be used for openings, educational events or outdoor exhibitions.

© Luc Boegly

The reception area, services and temporary exhibitions are located in the new section of the museum, while the permanent collections are presented on the two floors of the old station. The ground floor shows the transition from the village of Suresnes, with its traditions of vineyards and pilgrimages, to an industrial town which produced new mass-market items but generated housing problems. 

© Cyrus Cornut

As they go upstairs, visitors are greeted by the portrait of Henri Sellier, mayor of the town from 1919 to 1941, and discover his ambitions and actions.

© Luc Boegly

Models and objects displayed on large white tables tell the story of the town’s urban and social planning. Large scale images are projected to provide context and animate the displays. In this museum, we use the interplay of colours to successfully juxtapose contemporary architecture and a historic building: outside, the concrete imitates the soft, natural colour of the stone, while indoors the museography awakens the bright, joyous tones of the brick.

* Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
Cite: "Suresnes Museum of Urban and Social History / Encore Heureux + AAVP" 21 Jan 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 23 Aug 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=468467>

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