In Discussion: Peter Zumthor Speaks with Michael Govan About the LACMA Redesign

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In a crowed auditorium in central on Sunday, Swiss architect Peter Zumthor sat down with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art () director Michael Govan to kickstart the opening of The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA. The hour-long discussion, captured in the video above, began with an insightful overview of Zumthor’s most famous works before moving to an in-depth conversation about the underlying ideas that drive Zumthor’s design for the highly anticipated LACMA overhaul.

The project – already six years in the making and yet still in its schematic phase – plans to replace LACMA’s aging cluster of three pavilions with an elevated, 21st century facility. A detailed project summary, alongside images captured from Zumthor’s 6 ton, concrete exhibition model, is available for you to review here on ArchDaily. Enjoy! 

A First Look at Peter Zumthor’s Design for the LACMA
Cite: Rosenfield, Karissa. "In Discussion: Peter Zumthor Speaks with Michael Govan About the LACMA Redesign" 11 Jun 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 25 Oct 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=386661>
  • David Clemensen

    I’m getting awfully tired of architects and Museum directors planning to tear down buildings because they don’t fit current aesthetic.

    • Nikola

      One day Zumthor will be demolished and Zumthor’s LACMA will exist less longer than today LACMA building.

  • Sketchbook

    So much futile building and art nunsense kuming from LACMA.
    Try visiting during the week. The joint is EMPTY.

  • Gardner

    More nunsense from LACMA. Ever visit the joint during the week?
    It is empty !!!

  • Scott Warner

    I highly prefer Renzo Piano’s master plan, whatever happened to that? It is interesting to see the result of Peter Zumthor working in such a different environment than his normal stomping grounds and his design is not without merit. However, I also wonder if it is actually more economical to destroy the existing buildings to make way for this very monolithic museum.