L House / LAARQ

  • 10 May 2013
  • Houses Selected Works
Courtesy of LAARQ

Architects: LAARQ
Location: ,
Architect In Charge: José Ignacio Letelier O., Laura Aldea Dalidet
Calculation: Sebastián Silva Vargas
Construction: Construcciones Carreño
Area: 150 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of LAARQ

Courtesy of LAARQ

Pichilemu is one of the main attractions in the country today as it brings many foreign surfers, that have even stayed forever. Pichilemu is characterized by the usual south wind that does not always allow comfortable terraces and patios, restricting outdoors enjoyment. In turn, the main view, which attracts great attention to visitors is of the Morros de Punta de Lobos, two huge rocks that are international surfing icons, located to the south west of the house, in the same direction in which the wind blows.

Courtesy of LAARQ

The project joins two volumes together in an “L” shape where the public volume is half a floor higher than the private volume, managing to reach the maximum allowed by the rules of ownership, which is 4 mt. high, this in turn permits an oceans view. At the junction of both volumes is an available access, protected by a wind breaking structure with steel linings and coated in  2 “x 1″ wood.

Courtesy of LAARQ

The house is oriented in such a way that it creates protection for the courtyards and terraces from the constant south wind. Also incorporated into the public volume are a window that allows one to continue appreciating the oceans views. In the summer you can control the ventilation of the house by opening and closing the windows. In addition, this same orientation responds to the best use of light throughout the day, which helps keep the house heated and regulate a better temperature during the first hours of the night.

Courtesy of LAARQ

In order to make good use of the height of the public volume, a socket has been conditioned under it, which is intended as an arrival from the beach, it features an outdoor shower and a warehouse for surfboards. This place can be used as an extension of the patio and where space is created for a fire place (typical of Pichilemu), this also protected from the wind. The volume of the bedrooms are directed to the east in order to take advantage of the warmth of the morning sun and to recharge the energy of the owners for the rest of the day. These enclosures where also intended to protect indoor furniture from the afternoon sun that can easily damage material.

Courtesy of LAARQ

An investor who saw great potential of the area, worked on this project. The house is aimed at a typical stereotype customer of the area, thinking of Chilean surfers or middle-aged foreigners; anyway the house adapts to the needs of other customers too. To the interior there is a mix and match with the inner coatings, where natural wood handles (dull natural varnish) and white painted wood is used, in order to differentiate between walls, floors and ceilings.

Courtesy of LAARQ

It has a pine wood structure, with walls of 2 “x 4″.  Insulation in ceilings, walls and floors is used. In addition to this, dual beams are present to reduce floor movement generated by the wind. The public volume is structured with 7 wooden pillars aligned in two axes; they settle on two steel beams to obtain distances of 3 mt. between pillars and a cantilever that supports the windscreen that generates the access to the house. To obtain the slopes of the roof, wood trusses are implemented, which in the case of public volume are above the steel beams. On top of the trusses, structural OSB is installed, and finally covered with an asphalt membrane. The downfalls for water and rain are hidden in interior walls.

Courtesy of LAARQ

It uses a ventilated facade system, where a 2 “x 1″ pine wood covering, mounted vertically, is supported by a horizontal wooden frame keeping them separate from the wall, helping it  dry rapidly after rain or typical coastline moisture .

Plan
Cite: "L House / LAARQ" 10 May 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 23 Oct 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=371133>