Patrick Vale: City Lines Exhibition

  • 26 Mar 2013
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Patrick Vale, a name you might recognize due to his well-known time-lapse film, ‘Empire State of Pen’, that went viral last summer, will be opening up ‘City Lines’, his very first solo exhibition at the Coningsby Gallery in from April 4-12. Vale, a -based illustrator, artist and animator is a great example of how you can take your passion and talents and turn it into something that can be shared around the world. Capturing the public’s imagination with his film by clocking up to 700,000 plays in a few weeks, his intricate portraits of cities will now be on display. The large and highly detailed freehand drawings render the history and drama of our cities and invite us to peer into the fabric of the place. More images and information after the break.

Courtesy of Patrick Vale

The Huffington Post described the film as “jaw-dropping” and Rob Alderson from “It’s Nice That” commented that “the ridiculous level of skill involved is staggering”. This exhibition shows drawings made from trips to New York, San-Francisco, Los Angeles and his City of residence, London, made over the last 3 years.

Courtesy of Patrick Vale

He delights in showing us the intricate structures of fire escapes and rooftops as much as he does the more famous landmarks, and it is this that really allow the viewer to look and explore for themselves. This exploration is encouraged by Patricks line work, A.J Aternal from Architizer describes it as ” wilfully scraggly, imperfect without being whimsical or cute” .

Courtesy of Patrick Vale

He relentlessly builds up layer upon layer of line and ink that seems to mirror the time that has passed as these cities have grown and evolved. Often picking a very high vantage point, Patrick creates work that show vast swathes of the city that invites us to investigate and engage with.

For more information, please visit here.

Cite: Furuto, Alison. "Patrick Vale: City Lines Exhibition" 26 Mar 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 25 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=346864>

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