Green Walking Mall Competition Entry / Unika

  • 25 Dec 2012
  • by
  • mini Urban Design
Courtesy of Unika

Located in an area of , with unfinished buildings, the proposal for the Green Walking Mall is conceived as an inclusions program for the existing Bazar Quarter into the surrounding urban structures. Designed by Unika Architecture & Urbanism, this is accomplished through the new planning structure that installs broken links with neighboring quarters. Their design adds clarity to complicated pedestrian links and chaotic planning including program for the existing area into the surrounding urban structures. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Courtesy of Unika

There is a spontaneously built up market with chaotic planning, uncomfortable walkways and confusing visual connections.The Bazar Quarter is separated from the surrounding urban structures through its closed character and centripetal internal communications. Their design becomes possible with invariant movement: slow passing, walking and buying, rapid transit mall, riding a bicycle along new ways and to restore good visual connections.

Courtesy of Unika

Green Walking Mall is a rethinking of concept of Bazaar. This maintains basic function – trade. We propose to fill it with new features – you’ll need it to become live urban Public Space. We also add a good piece of Green Space, missing in this place. Green roofs are the continuation of existing green zones – to a green loop. Plus green park, arranged inside a Mall, gives a possibility of cross-cutting through continuous green spaces.

Courtesy of Unika

The main idea of non-stop-walking across indoor and outdoor spaces, along walkways, bridges, ramps and combined with bicycle moving provides full access to all areas, volumes and functions with a lot of fun from walking.

Architects: Unika Architecture & Urbanism
Location: Lviv, Ukraine
Client: OPENGAP, AlterMall competition
Type: Competition
Year: 2012

 

Cite: Furuto, Alison. "Green Walking Mall Competition Entry / Unika" 25 Dec 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 24 Jul 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=311926>

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