Julius Shulman (1910-2009)

Case Study House #22, (playboy), 1960 Los Angeles, CA / Pierre Koenig, architect   © Julius Schulman
Case Study House #22, (playboy), 1960 Los Angeles, CA / Pierre Koenig, architect © 

was a residential experiment sponsored by the Arts & Architecture magazine, introducing the modern movement ideas for affordable and efficient housing during the post-war years in the US.

The result? Amazing houses by Richard Neutra, Raphael Soriano, Craig Ellwood, Charles and Ray Eames, Pierre Koenig and Eero Saarinen, built between 1945-1966 mostly in LA.

Most of you already know about this… mostly due to the incredible photos that registered this houses, reflecting more than just pure architecture, a lifestyle. And the man (genius) behind the lens was Julius Shulman, who passed away yesterday July 16th, 2009.

A selection of his photos after the break.

Spencer Residence, 1950 Santa Monica, CA / Richard Spencer, architect  © Julius Schulman
Spencer Residence, 1950 Santa Monica, CA / Richard Spencer, architect © Julius Shulman
Recreation Pavilion, Mirman Residence, 1959 Arcadia, CA / Buff, Straub and Hensman, architects   © Julius Schulman
Recreation Pavilion, Mirman Residence, 1959 Arcadia, CA / Buff, Straub and Hensman, architects © Julius Shulman
Case Study House #22, (daytime pool), 1960 Los Angeles, CA / Pierre Koenig, architect   © Julius Schulman
Case Study House #22, (daytime pool), 1960 Los Angeles, CA / Pierre Koenig, architect © Julius Shulman
Case Study House #21, 1958 Los Angeles, CA / Pierre Koenig, architect   © Julius Schulman
Case Study House #21, 1958 Los Angeles, CA / Pierre Koenig, architect © Julius Shulman
Case Study Home #20 / Bass House, 1958 Altadena, CA / Buff, Straub and Hensman, architects   © Julius Schulman
Case Study Home #20 / Bass House, 1958 Altadena, CA / Buff, Straub and Hensman, architects © Julius Shulman
Kaufmann House, 1947 Palm Springs, CA / Richard Neutra, architect   © Julius Schulman
Kaufmann House, 1947 Palm Springs, CA / Richard Neutra, architect © Julius Shulman
Kramer House, 1953 Norco, CA / Richard Neutra, architect   © Julius Schulman
Kramer House, 1953 Norco, CA / Richard Neutra, architect © Julius Shulman
Frey House, 1953 Palm Springs, CA / Clark & Frey, architects  © Julius Schulman
Frey House, 1953 Palm Springs, CA / Clark & Frey, architects © Julius Shulman
Drake House, 1952 Phoenix, AZ / Blaire Drake, architect   © Julius Schulman
Drake House, 1952 Phoenix, AZ / Blaire Drake, architect © Julius Shulman
Singleton House, 1960 Los Angeles, CA  / Richard Neutra, architect   © Julius Schulman
Singleton House, 1960 Los Angeles, CA / Richard Neutra, architect © Julius Shulman
Case Study House #22, 1960 Los Angeles, CA / Pierre Koenig, architect   © Julius Schulman
Case Study House #22, 1960 Los Angeles, CA / Pierre Koenig, architect © Julius Shulman
Chuey House, 1958 Los Angeles, CA / Richard Neutra, architect  © Julius Schulman
Chuey House, 1958 Los Angeles, CA / Richard Neutra, architect © Julius Shulman
Case Study House #9 / Entenza House, 1950 Pacific Palisades, CA / Eames & Saarinen, architects  © Julius Schulman
Case Study House #9 / Entenza House, 1950 Pacific Palisades, CA / Eames & Saarinen, architects © Julius Shulman
Cite: Basulto, David. "Julius Shulman (1910-2009)" 17 Jul 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 20 Aug 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=29457>

13 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down +3

    Julius Schulman and Marvin Rand were both personal friends of mine, if not each other. 2009 is a year of profound loss as both have died. The best of California photography goes with them.

    It is incredible to think that JS changed the world with his “snapshots”. What makes his work great is that he saw space in exactly the way it was intended by the architects. That is to say, usually flowing away fromt he viewer and around corners. This is “dynamic symmetry” as opposed to the monumental symmetry that was favored by Rand.

    Architecture and photography are all about what is going on in the frame and outside of the frame at any given point. JS was in perfect synchronicity with his age and always able to depict the tension that made a building work.

    Truly, this is a great loss.

    Terry Glenn Phipps
    http://web.me.com/tgphipps

    • Thumb up Thumb down -5

      Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.

  2. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Julius Shulman was truly one of the world’s greatest photographers. He managed to revolutionize the field of architectural photography from something dull to something truly beautiful and alive. I have the amazing 3 volume set Modernism Rediscovered put out by Taschen. How I would have loved to have an original print for the Vilnius Jewish Library. The problem is that I am as about as rich as Tevye. Still I can look again and again at the lovely books of his outstanding compositions.

    Wyman Brent
    shammes
    Vilnius Jewish Library

  3. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    And these great images shall not be forgotten. As Terry said: “What makes his work great is that he saw space in exactly the way it was intended by the architects”- I second that! You really can see how “deep” was the perspective of these images.

    • Thumb up Thumb down 0

      I heard “Uncle Julius” as he called himself, give a lecture, just a few years ago, where he revealed many of his secrets. That young lady sitting upright inside Case Study House no. 22? She was a student he asked to sit in exactly that position. And he had to pose her several evenings in a row, because there was a particular moment when he had to take the shot: just at sundown and just as the city lights were coming on.

      All of his pictures were carefully stage-managed by him, so that people were always doing interesting things in important corners of the photograph. I remember him describing how he got the janitor of one building to hose down the parking lot so that its surface would reflect the building in his picture.

      What a guy. One of the greatest architectural photographers.

  4. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I had the great opportunity to meet Julius Shulman a few times back in 2003 in his house in Laurel Canyon – almost a case study place itself. While elderly and hard of hearing, he was a gracious host and an highly intriguing person to speak to about his life and the moments and elements of built form he captured.
    He will be greatly missed. RIP Julius!

  5. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Nuff respect, I had recently bought his 3 volumes collections of images, and thought how wonderful each photo was where every shot tells a wonderful story. We’ll miss him, but what a lifetime achievement!
    Thx for sharing the experiences, hopefully some other keen lens-junkies will take note and step up to the challenge…

  6. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Im sorry this will be an off topic comment, but throwing a party (chill atmosphere) in the living room of case study house #22 must be something different…

  7. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    is this modernism or minimalism or a dream for the moment-ism ?
    interesting how when you visit these homes they feel stale today compared to the rich feeling you get from entering a lavish 30′ – 40′s era Spanish home in Hollywood or Beverly Hills. You know the type they never age / are timeless and are coveted as homes to actually ‘live’ in rather than architectural curios purchased for hipster prestige value.
    argue all you want but the market and those who can buy anything they want know the truth – Villas ( preferably in Europe ) are what stay continually current. Now that’s modern ..er uh… Timeless.

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