SCI-Arc’s Gehry Prize awarded to ‘Phantom Geometry’

Masters of Architecture graduates Liz and Kyle von Hasseln have been awarded the inaugural Gehry Prize for developing an interruptible method, dubbed Phantom Geometry, that allows designers to make alterations to the design while it is being printed. The Phantom Geometry method is a convenient alternative to the conventional, static 3D printing systems available today. The system’s main components includes a UV light projector, a special photo-sensitive resin, and controlled robotic arms from SCI-Arc’s Robot House.

In their own words, the authors’ describe:

“We are developing a system of moving streaming information through space, in the form of light, to generate material form. This system is a full-scale, generative fabrication process that is innately non-linear, is interruptible and corruptible at any time, and does not rely on periodic flattening to 2D. Light is the medium for data in our system. There resident data can be drawn through physical space, at full scale, to generate a photographic artifact, or to instantiate material form through the selective polymerization of proximal photo-responsive resin. This thesis, then, begins to investigate a design paradigm centered on the material reification of light. That paradigm questions the supremacy of the digital model, and the static flattening and stacking logics inherent to typical fabrication workflows. It is part of a conversation about representation, about the role of the designer, and about the way we make.”

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via SCI-arc, phys.org

Cite: Rosenfield, Karissa. "SCI-Arc’s Gehry Prize awarded to ‘Phantom Geometry’" 22 Oct 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 24 Nov 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=284752>
  • Johannes @ RobArch

    There actually is a SciArc robot workshop at the Rob|Arch 2012 conference (www.robarch2012.org) for those interested in the topic of robots in architecture!