The 4 Coolest “High Line” Inspired Projects

LEGO Bridge by MEGX

New York City’s High Line has been such a success – both as an project and a money-making tourist attraction – that it’s spawned quite a number of Copy Cats around the world (we found 18 19, listed after the break, but no doubt there’s many  more…). Many, however, are more yawn-inducing than awe-inspiring. The following four projects are notably awesome exceptions.

Find out which projects made the cut, after the break…

LEGO Bridge by Megx.

4. “LEGO Bridge” – Wuppertal, Germany

The colorful LEGO-inspired bridge, painted last fall, is part of an Urban renewal project to redevelop the city of Wuppertal’s old Railway into a 10-mile cycle path. City officials hope it will “reinvigorate the city and increase residents’ quality of life.”

Unfortunately, no actual LEGOS were used in the making of this bridge; the illusion was designed by street artist Martin Heuwold of MEGX.

Hofbogen, designed by DOEPEL STRIJKERS.

3. “Hofbogen” – Rotterdam, The Netherlands

This plan of DOEPEL STRIJKERS to turn an old elevated train track in downtown Rotterdam into a commercial strip and elevated park, has an ingenious twist. The plan integrates city heating into the design: industrial waste heat will be used to warm the pre-war buildings along its trajectory, radically reducing their CO2 footprint.

The Transbay Center Project in San Francisco hopes to transform the Transbay Terminal with an extensive rooftop park.

2. “Transbay Transit Center” – San Francisco, California

Once a bustling train station, the Transbay Transit Center has been in a slow demise since WW2. Even though it’s been reconstituted as a bus terminal, the facility no longer serves much purpose in the community.

The proposed idea will retrofit the old, outdated building and turn it into a new high-speed rail terminus – but above the terminal is the real show-stopper. The 5.4 acre elevated park, designed by Pelli Clark Pelli Architecture, will incorporate cafes, retail areas, playgrounds, public art exhibits, an amphitheater and display gardens with climate-appropriate plants. It should be stroll-ready by 2017.

Courtesy of James Ramsey and Dan Barasch

1. “The Delancey Underground” – New York City, New York

As the Highline has everyone looking up, James Ramsey and Dan Barasch are asking people to start looking down. Satellite engineer turned architect, James Ramsey has developed a fiber-optic technology that will naturally light and bring life to the abandoned Williamsburg Bridge Trolley Terminal below the streets of . The renderings are positively sci-fi, but if this Kickstarter Project becomes a reality, the results could be truly fantastic.

 

More “High Line” Like Projects Around the World…

 

Cite: Quirk, Vanessa. "The 4 Coolest “High Line” Inspired Projects" 16 Jul 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 28 Jul 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=254447>

9 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down +7

    Paris had a highline before newyork…

  2. Thumb up Thumb down +9

    What about Promenade Plantée in Paris which was finished about 20 years ago?

  3. Thumb up Thumb down +8

    The NewYork Highline is a (good) copy of the parisian promenade…

  4. Thumb up Thumb down +8

    New York Highline is a (good) copy of the parisian viaduc daumesnil… completed years before new york!!

  5. Thumb up Thumb down +2

    Like the above said, are you going to admit that the High Line is a copy of the Promenade Plantée in Paris, opening in the late 1990s?

    Sheesh! Credit where credit is due, please.

  6. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    First thing I thought was ‘where is the Promenade Plantee’ in Paris? But it looks like that is covered. I still can’t believe it’s not even on the extended list. I remember the highline being a school project in the 1980s where I was studying because one of the tutors was proposing a linear park. Then Steven Holl did a project in the late 80s or very early 90s and still nothing till recently. Meanwhile Paris just got on with it. There are also a few linear parks along old railway lines in London but they are not ‘designed’ – that is, they are just landscaped as natural gardens and are quite lovely in themselves; bits of the natural world stringing along a dense urban city.

  7. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Something happened to my first attempt at a reply; hopefully it won’t be duplicated.
    I am very surprised at the omission of the Promenade Plantee in Paris…is it not ‘cool’ enough? I remember the highline as a school project in the mid-1980s when a tutor was working on a project for its transformation. Steven Holl took a crack at it and published a Pamphet book on it (also in the late 80s or very early 90s). Meanwhile Paris just got on with it. London also has a few converted railway lines into linear parks. No ‘design’, just simple natural landscapes winding through the city and very pleansant. But again probably not ‘cool’.

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