Spruce Art Center / LYCS Architecture

Courtesy of LYCS Architecture

Designed by LYCS Architecture, the Spruce Art Center recently commenced construction in Hangzhou, , . Flush with mature spruce trees and a pre-existing one story abandoned structure, the design is a mixture of two fundamental challenges in architecture: to evoke new spatial meaning while reconciling an existing structure, and to produce a formal language that can be dynamic and strong, yet carefully caress spruce trees. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Courtesy of LYCS Architecture

Inspired by traditional architectural aesthetics from the southern region of the Yangtze, known as the most desirable place to live in China, the architecture of this region is known to exude an intimate connection to water and to high-profile cultural institutions and people.

LYCS’s design creates three different internal courtyards hinged together, embracing within the spruce woods: a tranquil courtyard on the northeast part of the site secludes itself from the rest and blocks the often-busy views from outside and provides people with a moment to meditate with solitude, to appreciate the spruce in reflection and to respire at the enchanting West Lake resort.

Courtesy of LYCS Architecture

The central courtyard functions as an interior circulation space, connecting both the open and closed courtyard by dissuading movement and view. The roof is an evolution of the Chinese traditional tile pitched roof: the four vertexes of the roof curve up at minor degrees and consequently descend the roofing gently towards the midpoint while a mirrored action is duplicated towards the roofing center surprisingly at the end. This transformation holds the drainage advantage originated from the pitched roof, in addition to echoing a reminiscent sentiment along the buildings nearby.

Architects: LYCS Architecture
Location: Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China
Project Leader: Ruan Hao, Zhan Yuan
Design Team: Yang Meng, Li Yan

Cite: Furuto, Alison. "Spruce Art Center / LYCS Architecture" 02 Jun 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 24 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=239433>

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