MeasuringUP Symposium

Courtesy of State University: Department of Architecture

Presented by the Department of Architecture at Portland State University, the MeasuringUP symposium is dedicated to advancing regional knowledge and efforts for environmentally responsive architecture. Taking place May 10-11 on the campus, the event sets out to discuss the following questions: Are green buildings in use measuring up to their targets? What role do building occupants play in the discussion of performance? How can research in buildings inform and improve design practice? And how can successful strategies be replicated at a larger scale? More information on the event after the break.

As the largest contributor to global climate change, the built environment is increasingly becoming the focus of efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Consequently, a rising number of buildings are being promoted as examples of “high performance,” “green” or “sustainable” design. However, these claims are often based on design intent rather than measured performance.

The symposium launches with a free public lecture by Thomas Auer of the renowned firm Transsolar KlimaEngineering, in the Shattuck Hall Annex at 7pm, Thursday, May 10. Thomas Auer, considered one of the world’s leading experts in climate-responsive architecture and urban planning, is known for his work on national and international projects with architects including Kazuyo Sejima, Frank O. Gehry, Steven Holl, Jean Nouvel and Renzo Piano.

Then, on Friday, May 11, 2012, MeasuringUP will bring together local and international leaders in environmentally responsive design, engineering, research, industry and policy to address these questions through a day-long symposium, including Thomas Auer, and Cole Roberts, who leads the energy and resource sustainability business for the global planning, engineering, design and consulting firm Arup.

For more information, please visit here.

 

 

 

Cite: Furuto, Alison. "MeasuringUP Symposium" 23 Apr 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 23 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=228300>

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