Oslo Opera House wins Mies van der Rohe Award

Norwegian architecture firm Snøhetta has won the Mies van der Rohe architecture award for the Norwegian National Opera and Ballet in (previously featured on AD), the Mies van der Rohe Foundation announced Wednesday in Barcelona.

The price worth 60,000 euros (78,000 dollars) is awarded every two years by the European Union and the Mies van der Rohe Foundation in Barcelona for works completed over the previous two years.

Seen at TopNews. You can see the other finalists here.

Cite: Jordana, Sebastian. "Oslo Opera House wins Mies van der Rohe Award" 29 Apr 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 29 Aug 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=20953>

20 comments

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    my lord… you guys should take a look at the whole list and them tell me if this deserves to win!!! who made this decision and why?

  4. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    …and the prize for the year’s most “iconic”, clunkiest, quasi-lyrical, faux-democratic, treacherously public-attracting (but not delivering on the promise of involvement) and contextually disinterested building goes to….

    What would Mies have said?

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    Have you guys even visited the building??? I have and it’s a great solution for the city. A gathering point for tourists, a landmark the city desperatly needs and a cultural space for the whole city to gather around. Yes, the architects screwed up when it came to thee choise of stone used, as it would gain a yellow hue over time as a result of its contact with water, however this problem was solved by treating the stone with a spray-on compound.

    You guys should really look at the building a bit more carefully before going “It’s ugly, don’t like it!”

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    Well, for the finalist is for sure, the best one…but I agree with roadkill, there are some others also very good, for example the Center dramatique National Montreuil, by the almost unknown architect Dominique Coulon, wich will be good see appearing someone different..But this building is very good, and award also the nordic european architecture, wich is emerging with very good quality…

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    It isn’t my favorite building in the world but I watched a levture by one of the designers and was impressed. It was well thought out and well executed. They may have made a couple mistakes but who hasn’t? rarely is there a perfect project these days – especially one of this scale. It also seems to be well received by the community.

    As for slipping or falling…perhaps a better material could have been used but people can slip and fall on a sidewalk or on a hike in the mountains or in million other places or ways. At some point individuals have to take responsibility for their own self. If you see a wet sloping surface be very careful.

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    Personaly i’m not impressed by this one.It just seems uncomfortable and clumsy solution…a nice,well intended one…but ultimately failing and im not refering to those pratical details of the stone being too slipery. If look at it carefuly you’ll find very nice intentions,trying to gather the water front,the city and building,creating a lot of public space.Unfortunately it seems as if they did a 1:500 model and stop digging and maturing the project otherwise it could have been a great project even maybee becoming a long lasting icon for oslo..a bit like sidney’s opera house. Then again,this year’s selection was pretty weak..i remember the year koolhas won with dutch embassy in berlin, the competition was much much better…many of the contesters from that year would easily win it this year.I’m thinking of souto moura’s Braga Stadium for example…

  9. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    if i were them,i would use wood the build the ramp in order to creat a more cozy place for people to stay.

  10. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Personally, I love it when an aspect of architecture includes a risk, such as falling down those monolithic ramps. It makes people aware of their surroundings and appreciate their insignificance to something more powerful than them. It’s a test of ego.

  11. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Troy, try to say that to a building inspector who sees architecture through the Building Code :)

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    No building where people are literally slipping and being hospitalized should be nominated and/or granted any kind of architectural award. Period!

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    Well, maybe someone could get the same effect I described without creating a physical risk, but merely imply one. Is that better? Not nearly as exciting. Personally, I think that not all human lives are valuable. Take the administrators of the Federal Reserve for example. Purposefully damaging economy with the intent of coming out on top and in greater control.

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    Erm … it won. I think credit or trust would have to be given to the jury for rigorous tests and rational for the award. Commenting in Arch Daily does not qualify us as jurors. If so, how scary and unproductive would that be!?

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    This is like a shark or a whale coming up from the water. I like it:P

  16. Thumb up Thumb down +2

    I live in Oslo, and can tell you that the Snøhetta were not sued. There was an issue with discolouration, but it is solved now.
    Regarding the roof, we have no tradition of suing or blaming others when we fall. People are capable of making their own choices, and if something looks dangerous, don’t do it. If you still do and fall or slip, well… No one is to blame but yourself…

  17. Thumb up Thumb down +2

    People here spreading false rumours about law suits should shut up! There were some initial incidents of people tripping and falling, which also gathered interest from the media, but it soon faded. It’s not a problem, no serious injuries. Furthermore, Norway is not a member of the EU and doesn’t have to follow their safety rules. The same goes for our road tunnels, which is much steeper than the EU allows.

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