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Foster, Hadid, Gehry, Nouvel, Piano and more against Prince Charles

Prince Charles is against the modern design with glass and steel used by architects in the Chelsea district, and wants them to use a more traditional design using stones and bricks. The Sunday Times also said that Prince Charles showed his concern to Qatar’s royal family, owner of the site.

The design was developed by Richard Rogers, member of the House of Lords and known for projects like Heathrow’s Terminal 5, the Millenium Dome in London and the European Court of Human Rights. Rogers, with the other ten architects, accused Prince Charles of taking advantage of his royalty position to attack the architectural plans of the site.

This isn’t the first time that Prince Charles enters the architectural debate, strong supporter of Leon Krier’s New Urbanism.

Full text of the public letter to Prince Charles:

THE Prince of Wales’s intervention over the design of the former Chelsea Barracks site deserves more reasoned comment. It is essential in a modern democracy that private comments and behind-the-scenes lobbying by the prince should not be used to skew the course of an open and democratic planning process that is under way.

Proposals by Richard Rogers’s practice for the developers Qatari Diar were recently submitted for planning to Westminster city council. The scheme has been adapted and changed in response to comments from Westminster’s planning officers and extensive local consultation. Statutory bodies such as the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment and the Greater London Authority have also been consulted. Westminster’s planning committee will meet and shortly deliver its verdict.

Its members should be left alone to decide whether the Rogers’s scheme is a fitting 21st-century addition to the fabric of London. The developers have chosen carefully in selecting the best architect for the sensitive project. Rogers and his team have played their part in engaging with the democratic process. The prince and his advisers should do the same. The process should be allowed to take its course; otherwise we risk condemning this critical site to years as an urban blight.

If the prince wants to comment on the design of this or any other project, we urge him to do so through the established planning consultation process. Rather than use his privileged position to intervene in one of the most significant residential projects likely to be built in London in the next five years, he should engage in an open and transparent debate. Lord Foster, Foster and Partners, London, Pritzker Prize 1999 Zaha Hadid, Zaha Hadid Architects, London, Pritzker Prize 2004 Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron, Pritzker Prize 2001 Jean Nouvel, Jean Nouvel Architectes, Paris, Pritzker Prize 2008 Renzo Piano, Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Genoa, Pritzker Prize 1998 Frank Gehry, Gehry Partners, Los Angeles, Pritzker Prize 1989 Sir Nicholas Serota, Commissioner, CABE 1999-2006 Richard Burdett, London School of Economics David Adjaye, Adjaye Associates, London Deyan Sudjic, Director, Design Museum, London

Cite:Sebastian Jordana. "Foster, Hadid, Gehry, Nouvel, Piano and more against Prince Charles" 26 Apr 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/20645/foster-hadid-and-gehry-against-prince-charles/>