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Phantom Developments of the Southwest

© Wikimedia.org / Gobeirne
© Wikimedia.org / Gobeirne

During the housing boom in Phoenix and the surrounding suburbs, enormous swaths of land were graded and prepared for endless subdivisions as far as the eye could see. Following the burst of the housing market and prolonged recession, these unfinished construction sites have sat vacant – remnants of unbridled optimism in the Valley of the Sun. A recent article on NPR.org discusses some of the alternative visions for re-appropriating these phantom lots that propagate the greater Phoenix area. Various methods of breathing new life into these chasms left behind include rezoning the numerous residential lots for mixed-use, or tearing up the infrastructure and letting nature take back control. For those unfamiliar with the rapid pace of development that was taking place prior to the recession, Maricopa, a small town just south of Phoenix was approving over 600 residential home permits per month. With an inventory of over 16,000 dedicated to residential homes, the measures that are required to remediate the impact of such an ambitious plan need to be ingenious. While the Southwest has suffered from the housing bust significantly more than many other states, it will undoubtedly always remain a destination for its unequaled sunny days, warm weather and amazing desert landscape. See this article on similar circumstances in the Rust Belt region. Photographs: Wikimedia.org User: Gobeirne References: www.NPR.org, www.philly.com

Cite:Tim Winstanley. "Phantom Developments of the Southwest" 21 Jan 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/200177/phantom-developments-of-the-southwest/>