Lloyd’s building joins Grade I Elite

© ArchDaily

The futuristic Lloyd’s of London building has become one of the few postmodern buildings to be granted Grade I listed status, elevating the building to the top 2.5% of all listed buildings. Following Richard Rogers and Renzo Piano’s success with the great Pompidou Center in Paris (1977), Rogers designed the Lloyd’s building to replace the insurance company’s original headquarters in ’s medieval financial district. The building was completed in 1986 after eight years of construction, requiring 33,510 cubic meters of concrete, 30,000 square meters of stainless steel cladding and 12,000 square meters of glass to construct.

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© ArchDaily

The listing was recommended by English Heritage and the decision was made by heritage minister John Penrose. Under the Grade I elite status, the building now has extra protection against unsuitable alteration or development, sharing the same sort of protection as St Paul’s Cathedral and Windsor Castle.

© ArchDaily

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners expressed the listing as an honor, stating “It is important to conserve buildings of architectural and historical significance, and the work of English Heritage is central to that. It is also of vital importance for buildings to remain flexible spaces which meet the changing needs of those who live or work in them. English Heritage has recognized this, ensuring the spirit of the original design is retained while the building remains adaptable in the future.”

© ArchDaily

Lloyd’s of London is one of a few postwar buildings and structures granted Grade I listed status, joining Basil Spence’s Coventry Cathedral (listed in 1988), Norman Foster’s Willis Corroon Building in Ipswich (listed in 1991) and the Seven Bridge (listed in 1998).

Reference: The Guardian

Cite: Rosenfield, Karissa. "Lloyd’s building joins Grade I Elite" 26 Dec 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed 01 Sep 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=195390>

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