Apple Reveals Newly Renovated 5th Avenue Store

Courtesy of MacRumors

The white veil has been removed, exposing the $6.6 million renovation to the Fifth Avenue Retail Store. started the renovation back in June with plans to improve drainage and pavers, remove the bollards on the plaza, and update the cube.

The simplified version utilizes 15 panes of glass rather than the original 90, creating a “seamless” appearance. Each side of the cube consists of three, 10’ wide x 32’ high panels. Visible signs of hardware have disappeared as the connectors are embedded within the glass panes themselves.

Cite: Rosenfield, Karissa. "Apple Reveals Newly Renovated 5th Avenue Store" 05 Nov 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed 20 Dec 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=181941>
  • Antti Paasivaara

    $6.6 million to ruin the cube!

  • Ted

    They’re going to lose all the seams in the top and the sides that at night turned white from the lighting and created a ghost skeleton.

    It may be a mistake, because now the lack of detail and light could make it all look banal.

    This may be reductionism run wild, without a sense of detail and without previewing the effects in 3d design software.

    Minimalists know details matter and it’s not just about reductionism to the nil point – there are ideas about light and form at work.

    Be careful Apple. Without Steve Jobs, your mistakes won’t be so quickly overlooked in the name of a “genius at work.”

    • Richard F

      +1
      I have mixed feelings about this as well. IMO if Apple wanted seemless then do each side out of a single pane – that would have been awe inspiring and news worthy. this version looses beauty from the intricacy with little to no benefit from reduced pane count. overall seems boring but I reserve final judgement until I see it in person.

    • http://www.architecture.org.nz Guy Marriage

      “Be careful Apple. Without Steve Jobs, your mistakes won’t be so quickly overlooked” – ha! that makes me laugh. This redesign was entirely driven by Steve – right from the get go. The redesign is the sign of a perfectionist – a reduction in the minimal to the nth degree – if that isn’t classic Jobs at his most anal, then nothing is.

  • Paul Desmond

    If they have the money, spend it. why not. Apple is a company that is always pushing the boundary, with or without Jobs. He created a legacy and that will be carried on.

  • bosmat brants

    too many apples.

  • Marco Theseider Duprè

    i prefer the old one….. this looks only dull!

  • Walter Martinelli

    I am reading a bunch of non-sense comments above.
    One says that by reducing the glass panels there is a reduction of light in the cube. More, that in the new version there is a lack of detail. I say who cares of formal details in Apple philosophy? Steve’s and entourage’s point is to get rid of formal details, down to a pure form. This is the goal! The redesign of the cube was needed because the new version exactly meets Apple strategy of reductionism and strives to push the limits. Which limits? In this case the limits of glass dimensions. The re-design of the cube is a precise teaching example that will be once more noted, and taken in by the competition. Somebody else above says why not to have one piece of glass in each side. What kind of comment is this, it is clear that who says so does not have any knowledge of glass physical properties and related production technologies. Guys, think before saying anything, think or build up some culture.

    • Walter Martinelli

      I forgot something. Yes I agree with the person who says “too may apples”. On this choice I am surprised.

      • Alex

        Would you rather have no Apple logo? I only see 1.

        (The others are just reflections, but that should go without saying)