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Ecco / NAU

  • 24
    May
    2011
  • by
  • Articles
© NAU
© NAU

As an all-electric vehicle, the Ecco has no emissions of its own, and can be quickly charged at a standard 240V station. But when used for extended living purposes, even where no electricity is available, its built-in photovoltaic panels and solar sail roof mean that it can cut out the middle man, and charge directly from the sun.

Freedom is all about the pioneering spirit that takes you where you want, when you want, without a worry about how much a full tank will cost or harm the environment. Freedom means a spontaneous trip to the country or to the sea with friends which may last a day, or a week. While we may have gotten caught up in chasing the ultimate driving machine, the Ecco takes us back to a simpler time. A time when life was about treading lightly, both on the road and off. The Ecco’s promise: Zero emissions. Zero guilt. Unlimited space to dream.

© NAU
© NAU

Following on the heels of design classics like the Airstream or VW camper van, the Ecco gets passengers to their destination, and becomes a temporary home when they get there. Compact, stylish and aerodynamic while on the road, when it is parked, the Ecco expands to provide a level space and comfort than its fore bearers could only dream of. The exterior is a harmonious blend of precision aluminum and glass. Its direct and sculptural form cheats the wind while pleasing the eye. While a bit wider than its Volkswagen predecessor, the Ecco’s form is more aerodynamic, and the vehicle rides closer to the ground. The result is vastly improved interior volume, wonderful sight-lines for all passengers, and less wind resistance to boot.

© NAU
© NAU

© NAU
© NAU
Cite:Kelly Minner. "Ecco / NAU" 24 May 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/137475/ecco-nau/>