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Shumi Bose

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A Look at the Late-20th Century "High Tech" Architecture Movement

08:00 - 30 June, 2018
A Look at the Late-20th Century "High Tech" Architecture Movement, By <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/stawarz/">Andrew Stawarz</a> - <span> licensed under </span>, <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/">CC BY-ND 2.0</a>, <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/stawarz/6249670899">Link</a>
By Andrew Stawarz - licensed under , CC BY-ND 2.0, Link

From a historical perspective, visiting a significant work of architecture only amounts to a fractional part of what it takes to understand its importance. Context is crucial; every project responds to the society around it as much as it does the site that it inhabits, and it represents a synthesis of precedents and a point of inspiration for works that follow. As recently featured in Metropolis Magazine, these dynamics take center stage in a new exhibition staged in Norman Foster’s seminal Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, a contemporary landmark built in 1978 on the campus of the University in East Anglia in Norwich, England. Entitled Superstructures: The New Architecture: 1960–1990, the exhibit explores the central trends in post-war 20th-century building design, highlighting the historical context of the Sainsbury Center itself on the occasion of the museum building’s 40th anniversary.

A Filmic Adaption of Ballard's High-Rise Is a Visceral Complement to a Dystopian Vision

09:30 - 20 June, 2016
A Filmic Adaption of Ballard's High-Rise Is a Visceral Complement to a Dystopian Vision, The Brutalist high-rises in Ben Wheatley’s new film were inspired in part by Ernö Goldfinger’s Trellick and Balfron towers in London. Image Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures
The Brutalist high-rises in Ben Wheatley’s new film were inspired in part by Ernö Goldfinger’s Trellick and Balfron towers in London. Image Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as “Dystopia in the Sky."

For architects, if I may generalize an entire professional community, there are few novelists as cultishly beloved as J.G. Ballard. Borges or Calvino have their fair share of admirers, but to borrow an adjective more frequently applied to buildings, Ballard is the most iconic of literary figures—especially for readers of a concrete-expansion-joint persuasion. Witnessing war as a child, training in medicine, and thereafter writing from a rather bloodless middle-class patch of suburbia, Ballard spun tales of urban life that continue to be uncomfortably visceral.

Between the Kaleidoscopic Present and the Uncertain Future: A Case for Temporary Architecture

04:00 - 8 March, 2016
Plastique Fantastique: Sound of Light placed an inflatable structure into a 19th century music pavilion in Hamm, Germany in 2014. Image © RIBA Publications
Plastique Fantastique: Sound of Light placed an inflatable structure into a 19th century music pavilion in Hamm, Germany in 2014. Image © RIBA Publications

Temporary architecture is often misrepresented as a flimsy trend or photo-ready quick fix: easy, entertaining and often, mistakenly, cheap. This is Temporary concerns itself with a group of young, emerging, socially minded group of architects and designers who are taking the city back into their own hands and creating experimental sites for interaction and engagement. These architects, collectives, students and artists are designing transient structures, situations and events that invest and embed themselves in a community, public space or set of ideas.

Read an excerpt from the book This is Temporary after the break.