Samuel Medina

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A-KAMP47 / Stephane Malka

Courtesy of Lauren Garbit, via Metropolis Magazine
Courtesy of Lauren Garbit, via Metropolis Magazine

In an industrial section of Marseille, tents climb up a factory wall like a canvas creeper, housing urban campers and the local homeless alike. A-KAMP47, Stephane Malka's newest installation, subtly critiques the French state's promise for universal housing as well as makes an architectural commentary - Malka cites Le Corbusier's Unite D'Habitation as inspiration. Metropolis Magazine's Samuel Medina takes an in-depth look at the project in "Hiding in Plain Sight."

Famous Museums Recreated in Candy

Originally posted in Metropolis Magazine as "Iconic Museums, Rendered In Gingerbread", Samuel Medina looks into a fun project to realize world-famous buildings in various types of candy.

Had Hansel and Gretel stumbled across one of these sugary structures, they may have taken off in the opposite direction. Dark, gloomy, and foreboding, the confectionary architecture would have made quite the impression on Jack Skellington, however. The project, by food artist Caitlin Levin and photographer Henry Hargreaves, is clearly indebted to the gothic mise-en-scène of the latter’s expressionistic underworld, a dreary, but whimsical land where one might half expect to find a twisted (gumball) doppelganger of the Tate Modern or Zaha Hadid’s MAXXI.

Find out more about the process behind this sweet project after the break

Easily the most idiosynchratic choice, the Karuizawa Museum by Yasui Hideo is made of chocolate bars, gingerbread, hard candy, cotton candy, and sour flush. Image © Henry HargreavesI.M. Pei's pyramids at the Louvre are recreated with gingerbread, hard candy, and licorice. Image © Henry HargreavesThe curving form of the Museo Soumaya by FR-EE is draped in candy balls, gingerbread, sour rolls, and taffy. Image © Henry HargreavesZaha Hadid's MAXXI in Rome, with gingergread replacing its concrete shell, hard candy for glass, and lollipop sticks for columns. Image © Henry Hargreaves+ 7