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David Nixon

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How to Design When There is No Gravity

09:30 - 5 May, 2018
How to Design When There is No Gravity, © NASA <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/pingnews/491421253'>via Flickr</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/'>Public Domain Mark 1.0</a>
© NASA via Flickr licensed under Public Domain Mark 1.0

Not many architects will come across the challenge of building in outer space, but who knows what the future will hold... asteroid mining and space photobioreactors? In a recent article, Metropolis Magazine looks into the design of the International Space Station, examining how our conventional rules of architecture become obsolete in zero gravity. Walls, ceilings, and floors can be interchangeable, and "form follows function" is taken to the extreme.

2018 marks 20 years since construction first began on the International Space Station. The satellite is made up of 34 separate pieces, each of which was either delivered by space shuttle or self-propelled into space. With absolutely no room for error, the 13-year construction of the space station was perhaps one of the big success stories of the millennium, seeing 230 astronauts, cosmonauts and space-tourists visit over the past two decades.