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Architects As Developers: The Pros & Cons

09:30 - 24 October, 2016
Architects As Developers: The Pros & Cons, Jonathan Segal’s newest mixed-use project called “Mr Robinson” located in San Diego. Image © Jonathan Segal Architect
Jonathan Segal’s newest mixed-use project called “Mr Robinson” located in San Diego. Image © Jonathan Segal Architect

This article was originally published by Archipreneur as "Reasons Why Architects Can Make Great Developers (or not?)."

Today, a majority of architects work solely on the design end of the development process. It is common knowledge that the net value of architectural services in a projects’ total value amounts to a very small percentage (it’s usually in single digits), which puts architects near the bottom of the financial structure in the AEC industry.

Stuck between developers, clients, contractors, and subcontractors, architects are usually in a role that implies great responsibility but proportionally low compensation for it. When we add to that the grievance of not having full control of a project, it becomes clear as to why an increasing number of architects either transition to real estate development or transform their design offices into design-builds.

Though still in its infancy, this transition seems indicative of an emancipatory trend that’s taking place, where architects take matters into their own hands and thus claim their rightful position within the industry.