AD Classics: Villa Malaparte / Adalberto Libera

06:00 - 4 January, 2016
© Flickr User: Sean Munson
© Flickr User: Sean Munson

Villa Malaparte, built in 1938 by the Rationalist architect Adalberto Libera in Punta Massullo on the Isle of Capri, is considered to be one of the best examples of Modern Italian architecture. The house, a red structure with inverted pyramid stairs, sits 32 meters over a cliff on the Gulf of Salerno. It is completely isolated from civilization, only accessible by foot or by boat.

The house was commissioned by the Italian writer, Curzio Malaparte whose eccentric character eventually led him to dominate the design process, causing serious conflict with Libera. Malaparte wanted the house to reflect his own personal character and become a place for solitary contemplation and writing. He once said: "Now I live on an island, in an austere and melancholy house, which I built myself on a lonely cliff above the sea. [It is] the image of my desire."

© Gloria Saravia Ortiz. PhD Arquitecta UPC Barcelona España.  Académica Escuela de Arquitectura Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. © Gloria Saravia Ortiz. PhD Arquitecta UPC Barcelona España.  Académica Escuela de Arquitectura Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. © Karl Lagerfeld © Flickr User: John Athayde +15

9 Architects Reflect on the Homes That Most Inspired Them

01:00 - 1 May, 2014
The homes that inspire architects.
The homes that inspire architects.

Where do you receive inspiration? Nalina Moses asked the question to nine contemporary residential architects, asking each to choose one residence that had left an impression on them. The following answers were first published on the AIA’s website in the article “Homing Instinct."

When nine accomplished residential architects were asked to pick a house—any house—that has left the greatest impression on them as designers, most of their choices ran succinctly along the canon of American or European Modern architecture. Two—Alvar Aalto’s Villa Mairea and Pierre Chareau’s La Maison de Verre—were even tapped twice. 

If the houses these designers chose weren’t surprising, the reasons they chose them were. Rather than groundbreaking style or technologies, what they cited were the moments of comfort, excitement, and refinement they offered: the restful proportions of a bedroom, the feel of a crafted wood handrail, an ocean view unfolding beyond an outdoor stair.