Villa P / Architektonicke Studio Atrium

Courtesy of

Architects: Architektonicke Studio Atrium
Location: Karlovarská, 04011 – Západ, Slovakia
Project Year: 2012
Project Area: 350.0 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of Architektonicke Studio Atrium

Hongzhu Housing Sales Center / Lab Modus

© Chih-Ming Wu

Architects: Lab Modus
Location: Taoyuan County,
Design Team: Kevin Chang, Jay Lin, Will Hsieh, Yi-Li Lin
Project Year: 2012
Project Area: 1,200 sqm
Photographs: Chih-Ming Wu

Courtesy of Kawahara Krause Architects
Courtesy of Kawahara Krause Architects

“Line, Surface, Space“ Installation / Kawahara Krause Architects

The “Line, surface, space“ installation, by Kawahara Krause Architects…, is displayed as part of the architectural triennale in Hamburg this summer. Erected on the plan of three interlocking twisted squares of different sizes, the threads of the outer square

Store reform / A-cero

© Juan Sánchez

Architects: A-cero
Location: Calle de los Mesones, 51, 18001 ,
Architect In Charge: Joaquin Torres, Rafael Llamazares
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 48.0 sqm
Photographs: Juan Sánchez

Wind-dyed house / acaa

© Hiroshi Ueda

Architects: acaa
Location: , Kanagawa Prefecture,
Architect In Charge: Kazuhiko Kishimoto
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Hiroshi Ueda

Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer

© Jasper Sanidad

Architects: Studio Sarah Willmer
Location: 1098 Harrison St, , CA 94103, USA
Design Team: Sarah Willmer, Doris Guerrero, Megan Carter, Josue Munoz-Miramon, Olya Piskun
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Jasper Sanidad

Question: What would Archigram have done for the 2012 London Olympics?

Instant City

Share your creative responses in the comment section below:

AD Round Up: Classics Part V

© Flavio Bragaia

For today’s Round Up we have our 5th selection of AD Architecture Classics. In the main image is Villa Savoye by Le Corbusier, one of the most significant contributions to modern architecture in the 20th century. Look again at the famous Stahl House, also known as Case Study House #22 by Pierre Koenig. You must check out the amazing work of SOM in Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Revisit TWA Terminal by Eero Saarinen, who in order to capture the concept of flight, used curves to create spaces that flowed into one another. Finally, don’t miss the National Assembly Building of Bangladesh designed by Louis Kahn, an extraordinary example of modern architecture being transcribed as a part of Bangali vernacular architecture.

Looking for a Frank Lloyd Wright? You Have 30 Days…

The David S. Wright Home in Arcadia, Arizona. Photo via Curbd LA.

According to a local Arizona news channel, a home designed for his son, David S. Wright, is on the chopping block.

The house, located in Arcadia, Arizona, was purchased earlier this year by developers who plan to demolish the site – unless a buyer steps forth within the next 30 days.

The circular house is rather unique for Wright as an architect, and holds special significance for the Wright family. As Frank’s great-granddaughter, Anne Wright Levi, who often visited the house growing up, shared with 3TV: “This house is a piece of history, it represents a piece of Arizona that Frank Lloyd Wright loved so much. [...] This house was the community before the community was here, and it should be saved.”

So, how much will this piece of history cost you? Well, the developers bought the property for $1.8 million, so you can expect to dish out at least the same. But what’s a couple million when it comes to preserving a piece of architectural history?

Story via Yahoo News

The Courtyard House / Sanjay Puri Architects

Courtesy of Sanjay Puri Architects PVT Ltd

Architects: Sanjay Puri Architects
Location: ,
Architect In Charge: SANJAY PURI
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 3,000 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of Sanjay Puri Architects

Hanaha / mA-style architects

© Kai Nakamura

Architects: mA-style architects
Location: Makinohara, Shizuoka Prefecture,
Design Team: Atsushi Kawamoto, Mayumi Kawamoto
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Kai Nakamura

401 W 14th Street / Cook + Fox Architects

© Cook + Fox. Photo by Rob Cleary during Manhattanhenge

Architect: Cook+Fox Architects
Location: 401 West 14th Street
Client: Taconic Investment Partners
Size: 37,030 sqf
Completion Date: 2008

When we received an amazing photo from our friends at Cook + Fox of their 14th Street project during the Manhattanhenge sunset, we just had to share it with you.  A few years ago, Cook + Fox completed the renovation of this industrial mercantile warehouse situated in the Meatpacking District, turning the badly-weathered structure into viable commercial space (currently the space functions as an Apple retail store).    In order to retain the building’s historic Arts and Crafts character, Cook + Fox worked to replaced every element while preserving the integrity of the whole.

More about the project after the break. 

10 Dwellings in Paris / Bourbouze & Graindorge

© David Boureau

Architects: Bourbouze & Graindorge
Location: 18th arrondissement of , ,
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Philippe Ruault, David Boureau

Does a Good Cause Inevitably Lead to Good Architecture?

The Ronald McDonald House near Lurie’s Children’s Hospital, in Chicago. Photo for the Chicago Tribune by Michael Tercha.

In his architectural review of the Ronald McDonald House, a home for families with children at the nearby Children’s Hospital, Blair Kamin came up against a moral dilemna:

How can you criticize a building whose cause is so much better than its architectural form? 

As Kamin says: “Criticize anything in such building and you’re bound to sound insensitive, as if aesthetics mattered more than cancer. Yet all urban buildings, no matter what their purpose, are obliged to appeal to a broader constituency — namely, the people who pass by them every day. [...] To say [it's no prize-winning work of architecture] isn’t to deny the good that’s done there. It’s to wish that the building excelled equally at raising the quality of the cityscape.”

Ultimately, Kamin’s quandary comes down to a central architectural question: to what extent must a building, even one which serves a higher purpose, improve the context in which it finds itself? At the end of the day – are form and function equally important?

Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Story via ArchRecord and the Chicago Tribune

‘Schaustelle’ Temporary Pavilion / J. Mayer H. Architects

Courtesy of

Designed by J. MAYER H., the ‘Schaustelle’ or ‘show site’ will be a temporary pavilion and platform for the four collections housed at the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich, . The temporary closure has been seen as an opportunity that will give rise to a makeshift exhibition building – the Schaustelle. Set up to hold exhibitions, workshops, talks, performances, film screenings and video installations, and much more, the scheme has been initiated by the Pinakothek der Moderne Foundation. More images and architects’ description after the break.

How (Not) to Host The Olympics (Part III)

The Olympic Agora, designed by Santiago Calatrava, in Athens. Photo via Flickr User CC John & Mel Kots.

Welcome back and congratulations for having made it to the final installation of the .

So far, in parts I and II, we’ve learned how to design for your post-Games legacy (No White Elephants please) and to revitalize -not demolish- your city’s most deprived “eye-sores” (Don’t Hate, Rejuvenate).

So what’s left? Well, in this post-Recession era of austerity, a huge part of your Olympic Strategy will be justifying the spending – the colossal spending – to your more than skeptical constituents. As I said in the last post, a good starting point is targeting urban renewal and being as transparent as possible, but another big element is how you market the Games – not just to the International Committee (IOC), but to your own city-dwellers.

So how can you get them both on your side? Simple - Go Green.

How (Not) To Host the Olympics (Part II)

“We Will Not Leave” Words painted on a wall in a neighborhood slated for demolition. Despite some protests, Beijing citizens were powerless to stop the demolition of their homes in the name of the . Photo via Flickr CC User theroadisthegoal

If you remember nothing else from  Part I of our Olympic City Guide, Your Very Own Guide to Successfully Hosting the Olympic Games, make it the GOLDEN RULE: “The best thing to do if you’re bidding for the Olympics, Is to Not Get the Olympics.”

As we explained in Part I, this take-it-or-leave-it mentality is key to Olympic success. See the Olympics as the Games, and, come autumn, you’ll find your city littered with resource-guzzling, empty stadiums. See the Olympics as an excuse to get your plans for Urban Renewal into hyper-drive, and you’ll get the gold: a publicity-hogging, urban makeover that will continue to make you profit years after the Olympic circus has packed up and gone home.

But Olympic legacy doesn’t just come down to dollars and cents. It often means making a very real socio-cultural impact. Which leads us to our second set of Dos and Donts, starting with DON’T: Be Shady. And yes, we’re looking at you Beijing…

Keep reading for the Dos and Donts of Olympic Hostdom, after the break…

When Buildings Build Themselves

In the second part of our popular series “How 3D Printing Will Change Our World,” we took a look at the work of Neri Oxman, an MIT professor 3D Printing fantastic, nature-inspired designs that actually respond to their environment.

But an MIT colleague and fellow architect, , and his partner Arthur Olson of the Scripps Research Institute, are taking Oxman’s thesis one step further. Similarly inspired by natural properties that allow for interaction with the environment, these two are trying to figure out: ”Could buildings one day build themselves?”

The two recently exhibited the Autodesk-sponsored BioMolecular Self-Assembly at TED Global 2012 in Edinburgh, Scotland. The project? Take the basic ingredients for molecular assembly,  put them in individual flasks, and shake well. The result? The independent parts actually find each other and self-assemble various structures themselves.

It looks pretty small-scale right now, but Olson and Tibbits have already applied self-assembly technologies for larger installations – which means that buildings might not be so far off…

Find out how this technology could create buildings, and check out more photos/video, after the break…