Courtesy of World Financial Center

19th Annual Canstruction® Raises Hunger Awareness with Food Drive Exhibit

At this year’s 19th annual Canstruction: Exhibition, a Food Drive and Design Contest at the World Financial Center in New York City, 26 design and architecture firms have built gigantic, gravity-defying sculptures from thousands of cans of food. Over 100,000…

University Sports Hall / Canvas Arquitectos

© Fernando Alda

Architects: Canvas Arquitectos - Juan Vicente and Pablo Núñez and Eduardo Duro Almazán.
Location: Linares (Jaén), 
Built area: 2,500 sqm
Client: Govermment of Andalucía, Jaén University and Linares City Council
Completion: 2010
Collaborators architects: José Riesco Urrejola, Francisca Rivera Palma, Marta González Antón, Íñigo Pericacho Sánchez, Jesús Domínguez Miñambres, Carmen Figueiras Lorenzo and Claudia Henao Ocampo.
Collaborators Surveyors: Domingo Infante Chozas, Andrés García Pinto and Victor Zato S.L.
Photographs: Fernando Alda

Salongen 35 / KKA

Courtesy of

Architect: KKA
Location: Västra Hamnen, Malmö,
Client: Höllviksnäs Förvaltnings AB
Area: 400 sqm
Completion: 2011
Design Team: Joakim Kaminsky, Fredrik Kjellgren, Marie Löwenherz, Alessandro Micelli, Yvonne Lohmann, Pamela Paredes, Maria Martinez
Photographs: Kasper Dudzik, KKA

 

Video: Bjarke Ingels Exposes His Roots

As we have shared with you earlier, ’s The Next List has profiled the young, Danish architect Bjarke Ingels. Originally aspired to be a cartoonist or graphic novelist, Ingels quickly became fascinated with architecture when a Fall storm rolled through his hometown in North Copenhagen, knocking over trees and leaving him a surplus of lumber. It was then that he was inspired to design his first project, the ultimate childhood “fantasy fort” with a moat, drawbridge and all.  In Ingels first experience with value engineering, he quickly learned that “unless you really begin with the perimeters of reality you’ll end up sort of amputating your ambitions quite quickly.” Enjoy the video and be sure to check out CNN’s recent video focusing on the bold ideas behind BIG.

Additionally, Ingels contributed an essay entitled Rethinking social infrastructure” on CNN’s What’s Next blog. You can check it out here.

Reference: CNN, Archinect

Chameleon Restaurant / Za architects

Courtesy of

Chameleon is a design of a dynamic interior which adapts to changing environment and can serve various purposes. The interior of the restaurant adapts to changing environment in the same way as the chameleon changes its color depending on its mood. The created space of the restaurant constantly resorts to mimicry and adaptation.

AD Recommends: Best of the Week

© André Morin / DPA / Adagp

It was a great week for ArchDaily, featuring amazing projects from every corner of the world. Main image is from Dominique Perrault’s Ewha Womans University in the Republic of Korea. What about J. Mayer’s Police Station in Georgia? Join the discussion in our comments! TEN Arquitectos shared with us the MUSEVI, a museum in Tabasco, Mexico. Which movie would you choose to see at the Archipelago Cinema? Cast Away? The Beach? Last, don’t miss the Eco-Sustainable House designed by Djuric Tardio Architectes in Paris.

Cumberland Park / Hargreaves Associates

Courtesy of

Architects: Hargreaves Associates + EOA Architects
Location: Nashville, , USA
Developer: MDHA
Program Manager: American Constructors
Operator: Metro Parks
Photographs: Courtesy of Hargreaves Associates

Infographic: LEED

Senior Housing De Dijken 10 / HVE architecten

©

Architects: HVE architecten
Location: , The Netherlands
Project Team: Gerrit van Es, Sascha van Esch, Lia Tuijt
Client: Vidomes Delft
Project Area: 9,800 sqm
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: HVE architecten, Scagliola Brakkee, Christiane Wirth

Kulturcampus Frankfurt / Adjaye Associates

Courtesy of

The Kulturcampus designed for Frankfurt, by Adjaye Associates rests on the idea of grouping a city’s most important cultural institutions into the heart of the city.  The focus is on creating a micro-city on the city that is currently occupied by the University of Frankfurt, which will be vacated in 2014.  This micro-city is intended to be diverse collection of uses that will provide a space of gathering for the adjacent neighborhoods of the campus.

Read on for more after the break.

Public Library Vallecas / Exit Architects

Courtesy of Exit Architects

Architects: Exit Architects – Ibán Carpintero, Mario Sanjuán, Ángel Sevillano
Location: ,
Client: Madrid Regional Government
Built area: 3,691 sqm
Budget: 4,297,945 Euros
Technical Architects: Jose Antonio Alonso, Alberto Palencia
Mechanical consultants: JG Ingenieros. Juan Antonio Posadas
Structural consultants: NB 35. Alberto López Nafria
Photographs: Miguel de GuzmánP Álvarez CousoExit Architects

 

AD Interviews: Winy Maas / MVRDV

We had the incredible opportunity to interview Winy Maas, the M in MVRDV, one the most influential contemporary practices, which has been able to push the boundaries of our field in different scales, from buildings to master plan, from construction to theory. In this interview Winy shares interesting thoughts on the role of the architect and how he runs this design/research practice.

Upon graduating in 1984 from the RHSLT Boskoop in landscape architecture, Winy Maas (Schijndel, 1959) resumed his education at Delft University of Technology where he completed his degrees in architecture and urbanism, graduating in 1990 with honors. Shortly after and together with Jacob van Rijs and Nathalie de Vries, Maas founded MVRDV in 1991.

Since then, the Rotterdam-based practice has earned a leading role in international architecture. ’s first commissions, both located in , included the television center Villa VPRO and the housing estate for elderly WoZoCo. Maas lectures and teaches throughout the world and actively takes part in international juries. Currently, Maas is a visiting professor of architectural design at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is professor in architecture and urban design at the faculty of architecture, Delft University of Technology. Prior to this, he served as professor at Berlage Institute, Ohio State and Yale University. In 2008, Maas founded The Why Factory (t?f), a thinktank on future cities at Delft University of Technology where he remains director. You can see an example on the Urban Farming In Numbers video.

Maas is also a member of the research board of Berlage Institute Rotterdam, president of the spatial quality board of Rotterdam, supervisor of the Bjorvika urban development in Oslo and advisor to the city of Almere. To add to his ever-growing list of achievements, Maas has been made honorary member of the AIA, received the international fellowship of the RIBA and the French Legion d’Honneur. In addition to being an architect, he designs stage sets, objects and was curator of Indesem 2007.

MVRDV projects previously featured at ArchDaily:

Finalists for the Masterplan of Tirana, Albania / Grimshaw Architects

Courtesy of Grimshaw Architects

Grimshaw Architects is one of two finalists selected in a competition for the master plan of central , .  The competition brief called for a comprehensive strategy that built upon the international identity of the city – particularly its waterways and the major boulevard running between them.  It also called for an integration of transportation links – a city-wide transformation to streamline the infrastructure and bring vitality into the experience of the city.

Read on for more on Grimshaw’s strategy to enrich Tirana.

Citylights / Dominique Perrault Architecture

Courtesy of

Dominique Perrault Architecture shared with us their winning proposal in the international architecture competition launched by General Electric Capital Real Estate for the requalification of the Pont de Sèvres Towers. Their design response, which could at first appear minimalist, proposes a luminous landmark for one of the most ambitious programs in the service sector of the Western Paris area. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Narbethong Community Hall / BVN

Courtesy of

Architects: BVN
Location: , Australia
Photographs: Courtesy of BVN

  

Where is LEED Leading Us?…And Should We Follow?

CityCenter, a LEED Gold Building in Las Vegas, demonstrates the irony of a LEED Certified, sustainable, building in the unsustainable context of the desert.

At this point, it’s fairly uncontroversial to say that the Earth is under siege. From us, from our resource-consuming ways, ultimately, from our thoughtlessness.

is not just a catch-phrase, but a mindset. As Architects, implementing the principles of means putting thoughtfulness back into our actions, conscientiously considering our built environment, and reversing the havoc we have wreaked on our resources.

To do that, we need to know what Green Design means, and be able to evaluate what it is and isn’t. Using Earth Day as our excuse then, let’s examine the single most influential factor on the future of Green Design: LEED.

To its credit, LEED has moved a mountain: it has taken the “mysticism” out of Green Design and made Big Business realize its financial benefits, incentivizing and legitimizing it on a grand scale.

But as LEED gains popularity, its strength becomes its weakness; it’s becoming dangerously close to creating a blind numbers game, one that, instead of inspiring innovative, forward-looking design, will freeze us in the past.

Read the 10 Pros & Cons of LEED, after the break…

Courtesy of Portland State University: Department of Architecture

MeasuringUP Symposium

Presented by the Department of Architecture at Portland State University, the MeasuringUP symposium is dedicated to advancing regional knowledge and efforts for environmentally responsive architecture. Taking place May 10-11 on the Portland State University campus, the event sets out to…

Northface House / Element Arkitekter AS

© Dinesen

Architects: Element Arkitekter AS
Location: ,
Design Team: Cathrine Vigander, Vidar Kutsen, Hallvard Huse, Alexander Wærste
Consultants: Boye og Waage & Co AS, Jan Petter Dybdahl AS and Moelven Massivtre AS
Gross area: 277 sqm.
Completion: 2010
Photographs: Element Arkitekter AS