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9 Lessons For Post-Architecture-School Survival

08:00 - 19 August, 2016

We’ve already talked about this. You’re preparing your final project (or thesis project). You’ve gone over everything in your head a thousand times; the presentation to the panel, your project, your model, your memory, your words. You go ahead with it, but think you'll be lousy. Then you think just the opposite, you will be successful and it will all be worth it. Then everything repeats itself and you want to call it quits.  You don’t know when this roller coaster is going to end. 

Until the day arrives. You present your project. Explain your ideas. The committee asks you questions. You answer. You realize you know more than you thought you did and that none of the scenarios you imaged over the past year got even close to what really happened in the exam. The committee whisper amongst themselves. The presentation ends and they ask you to leave for a while. Outside you wait an eternity, the minutes crawling slowly. Come in, please. The commission recites a brief introduction and you can’t tell whether you were right or wrong. The commission gets to the point.

You passed! Congratulations, you are now their new colleague and they all congratulate you on your achievement. The joy washes over you despite the fatigue that you’ve dragging around with you. The adrenaline stops pumping. You spend weeks or months taking a much-deserved break. You begin to wonder: Now what?

The university, the institution that molded you into a professional (perhaps even more so than you would have liked), hands you the diploma and now you face the job market for the first time (that is if you haven’t worked before). Before leaving and defining your own markers for personal success (success is no longer measured with grades or academic evaluations), we share 9 lessons to face the world now that you're an architect.

Comic Break: "Top Jobs List"

07:00 - 19 August, 2016
Comic Break: "Top Jobs List", © Architexts
© Architexts

People are impressed when you tell them you are an architect. Why shouldn’t they, after all? You share the same title as Frank Lloyd Wright, and that other Frank who builds all those crazy looking buildings. As most of us know from experience, our lives are not that dissimilar from most people living in relative anonymity. How did the architects’ reputation become so acclaimed, yet, so far from what most of us experience?

de Architekten Cie. Reveal New Galileo Reference Centre in The Netherlands

06:00 - 19 August, 2016
de Architekten Cie. Reveal New Galileo Reference Centre in The Netherlands, Courtesy of de Architekten Cie.
Courtesy of de Architekten Cie.

Dutch firm de Architekten Cie. have revealed their design for the Galileo Reference Centre, a new data collection center for the Galileo satellite system in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. Primarily housing office space and computer rooms, the center has been designed as a highly efficient and resilient building which can be adapted into the future.   

Courtesy of de Architekten Cie. Courtesy of de Architekten Cie. Courtesy of de Architekten Cie. Courtesy of de Architekten Cie. +14

Kokoon / Aalto University Wood Program

05:00 - 19 August, 2016
Kokoon  / Aalto University Wood Program, © Marc Goodwin
© Marc Goodwin

© LéaPfister Courtesy of  Aalto University Wood Program © LéaPfister © Marc Goodwin +89

AD Classics: Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes

04:00 - 19 August, 2016
AD Classics: Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, The Exposition’s poster, designed by Robert Bonfils. ImageCourtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum
The Exposition’s poster, designed by Robert Bonfils. ImageCourtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum

The end of the First World War did not mark the end of struggle in Europe. France, as the primary location of the conflict’s Western Front, suffered heavy losses in both manpower and industrial productivity; the resulting economic instability would plague the country well into the 1920s.[1] It was in the midst of these uncertain times that the French would signal their intention to look not to their recent troubled past, but to a brighter and more optimistic future. This signal came in the form of the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes (International Exposition of Decorative Arts and Modern Industries) of 1925 – a landmark exhibition which both gave rise to a new international style and, ultimately, provided its name: Art Deco.

Courtesy of Wikimedia user François GOGLINS (Public Domain) Courtesy of Wikimedia user François GOGLINS (Public Domain) Horta’s Belgian Pavilion was a radical departure from his typically curvilinear Art Nouveau style. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user François GOGLINS (Public Domain) Courtesy of Wikimedia user François GOGLINS (Public Domain) +14

Ondo / MAMM DESIGN

03:00 - 19 August, 2016
Ondo  / MAMM DESIGN, © Daici Ano
© Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano +17

  • Architects

  • Location

    Tokyo, Japan
  • Area

    89.34 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

52 Cubic Wood / JOSEP + Atelier Haumer

02:00 - 19 August, 2016
52 Cubic Wood  / JOSEP + Atelier Haumer, © Bernhard Fiedler - JOSEP
© Bernhard Fiedler - JOSEP

© Bernhard Fiedler - JOSEP © Bernhard Fiedler - JOSEP © Bernhard Fiedler - JOSEP © Bernhard Fiedler - JOSEP +21

House in Mikage / SIDES CORE

22:00 - 18 August, 2016
House in Mikage  / SIDES CORE, © Takumi Ota
© Takumi Ota

© Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota +18

  • Architects

  • Location

    Higashinada Ward, Kobe, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan
  • Architect in Charge

    Sohei Arao
  • Construction

    Nakanishi Kenchiku
  • Area

    101.2 sqm
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Adagio Valley for Department of Music at University of Seoul / Wooridongin Architects

20:00 - 18 August, 2016
Adagio Valley for Department of Music at University of Seoul / Wooridongin Architects, © Kim Jae-Kyeong
© Kim Jae-Kyeong

© Kim Jae-Kyeong © Kim Jae-Kyeong © Kim Jae-Kyeong © Kim Jae-Kyeong +21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Jeonnong-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, South Korea
  • Collaborators

    J & J Architects Inc.
  • Area

    1285.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Villa Ribander / Raya Shankhwalker Architects

19:00 - 18 August, 2016
Villa Ribander  / Raya Shankhwalker Architects

Villa Ribander  / Raya Shankhwalker Architects Villa Ribander  / Raya Shankhwalker Architects Villa Ribander  / Raya Shankhwalker Architects Villa Ribander  / Raya Shankhwalker Architects +15

Hidden House / Jackson Clements Burrows

17:00 - 18 August, 2016
© John Gollings
© John Gollings

© John Gollings © John Gollings © John Gollings © John Gollings +18

SOM's Timber Tower System Successfully Passes Strength Testing

16:30 - 18 August, 2016

The recent trend in timber-framed architecture may just be beginning.

SOM’s Timber Tower Research Project has passed a major milestone as the structural system has successfully completed strength testing that validate initial calculations. Launched in 2013, The Timber Tower Research project was established with the goal of developing a new structural system for skyscrapers that uses timber as its primary material. Using these techniques, the research team estimates that the embodied carbon footprint of buildings can be reduced by 60 to 75 percent when compared to a benchmark concrete building.

The Light Box / Esculpir el Aire

15:00 - 18 August, 2016
The Light Box  / Esculpir el Aire, © José Ángel Ruiz Cáceres
© José Ángel Ruiz Cáceres

© José Ángel Ruiz Cáceres © José Ángel Ruiz Cáceres © José Ángel Ruiz Cáceres © José Ángel Ruiz Cáceres +19

These are the World's Tallest Twisting Skyscrapers

14:20 - 18 August, 2016
These are the World's Tallest Twisting Skyscrapers, Courtesy of CTBUH
Courtesy of CTBUH

The past ten years have seen a new twist in tall building design: buildings that rotate as they rise, either for engineering or purely aesthetic purposes. Inspired by this recent trend, the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) has produced a new graphic entitled Tall Buildings in Numbers “Twisting Tall Buildings” to analyze the “recent proliferation of twisting towers creating a new generation of iconic buildings throughout the world.”

The infographic compares the buildings by height, along with the tightness and total degrees of their rotation. Continue after the break for the full graphic and links to the projects on ArchDaily.

RH House / Estudio Base Arquitectos

13:00 - 18 August, 2016
RH House / Estudio Base Arquitectos, © Jesus Letelier
© Jesus Letelier

© Jesus Letelier © Jesus Letelier © Jesus Letelier © Jesus Letelier +30

8 Things You Should Know About Fazlur Khan, Skyscraper Genius

12:45 - 18 August, 2016
8 Things You Should Know About Fazlur Khan, Skyscraper Genius, © flickr user achimh. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
© flickr user achimh. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

When it comes to skyscraper architects, the first name that comes to mind is often Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. No firm has completed more supertall buildings than SOM, and to this day, they remain a leader in the field, designing both the western hemisphere’s and the world’s tallest buildings in One World Trade Center and the Burj Khalifa. Yet, arguably, the height of their powers came in the 1970s, directly following a lull in skyscraper construction that allowed the Empire State Building to retain the status of world’s tallest building for nearly 40 years.

It was then that Falzur Khan, a SOM architect and structural engineer, came up with the structural innovation that revolutionized the skyscraper industry, leaving lasting impacts on the construction methods of supertall buildings today.

Drawing from a recent story published by Mental Floss on the designer, we’ve come up with a list of facts about his life and role in the world of architecture.  

Continue reading for the 8 things you should know about Falzur Khan.

ColiRoma OneHundredTwentyEight / Arqmov Workshop

11:00 - 18 August, 2016
ColiRoma OneHundredTwentyEight  / Arqmov Workshop, © Rafael Gamo
© Rafael Gamo

© Rafael Gamo © Rafael Gamo © Rafael Gamo © Rafael Gamo +20

  • Architects

  • Location

    México, Colima 128, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México, D.F., Mexico
  • Architects in Charge

    ARQMOV WORKSHOP
  • Area

    2300.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Studying the "Manual of Section": Architecture's Most Intriguing Drawing

09:30 - 18 August, 2016
Studying the "Manual of Section": Architecture's Most Intriguing Drawing, Phillips Exeter Academy Library by Louis I. Kahn (1972). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects
Phillips Exeter Academy Library by Louis I. Kahn (1972). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects

For Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki and David J. Lewis, the section “is often understood as a reductive drawing type, produced at the end of the design process to depict structural and material conditions in service of the construction contract.” A definition that will be familiar to most of those who have studied or worked in architecture at some point. We often think primarily of the plan, for it allows us to embrace the programmatic expectations of a project and provide a summary of the various functions required. In the modern age, digital modelling software programs offer ever more possibilities when it comes to creating complex three dimensional objects, making the section even more of an afterthought.

With their Manual of Section, the three founding partners of LTL architects engage with section as an essential tool of architectural design, and let’s admit it, this reading might change your mind on the topic. For the co-authors, “thinking and designing through section requires the building of a discourse about section, recognizing it as a site of intervention.” Perhaps, indeed, we need to understand the capabilities of section drawings both to use them more efficiently and to enjoy doing so.

Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon (1976). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects Notre Dame du Haut by Le Corbusier (1954). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects United States Pavilion at Expo '67 by Buckminster Fuller and Shoji Sadao (1967). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright (1959). Published in Manual of Section by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis published by Princeton Architectural Press (2016). Image © LTL Architects +15