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Housing Design: Building a Better Future

This seminar will focus on the myriad of factors that can influence quality housing design. Daisy Froud, Co-founder of AOC and Meredith Bowles, Director of Mole Architects highlight the ways housing can respond positively to surrounding context, and the key aspects that can contribute to character of place.

Eileen Gray: The Private Painter

Osborne Samuel gallery is pleased to announce the first UK exhibition of paintings by the Irish designer and architect Eileen Gray (1878 - 1976). A leading pioneer of Modernist design, she is widely regarded as one of the most influential architects and designers of the 20th century. The exhibition will feature over 60 paintings and photographs from the 1920s - 1960 that will be for sale, and will include some of the artist’s personal ephemera and letters.

RIBA London Seminar: The Skills You Need to Succeed

Richard Fallon, a specialist voice, presence, and personal impact coach, will focus this session on how to talk to your team, win that pitch and manage client relationships.

RIBA London Seminar: The Seven Ages of Practice

The Seven Ages of Practice, led by Andrew Whiting of HÛT highlights how best to maintain your brand; from inception through to legacy. Taking its name from Shakespeare's poem the 'Seven Ages of Man', Andrew will cover aspects of marketing, the media and how to react in a competitive market.

Revit Architecture 101 - Online Course (And We're Giving Away a ThinkParametric Membership!)

ThinkParametric launches its Revit Architecture 101 course taught by Håvard Vasshaug Design Technologist and BIM Specialist at DARK Architects. 

SelgasCano in Conversation with Hans Ulrich Obrist, Smiljan Radić and Sou Fujimoto

Last month, as part of their Park Nights event series, COS assembled Spanish architects José Selgas and Lucía Cano (SelgasCano) at their new pavilion for the Serpentine Gallery in London's Hyde Park to discuss the concepts behind their design and the history of the Pavilion Commission with Serpentine directors Julia Peyton-Jones and Hans Ulrich Obrist. They were joined by Chilean architect Smiljan Radić, designer of the 2014 pavilion, and Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto, designer of 2013's, in an hour long conversation moderated by Sarah Ichioka. 

Spotlight: Santiago Calatrava

Known for his daring neo-futurist sculptural buildings and over 50 bridges worldwide, Santiago Calatrava (born July 28, 1951) is one of the most celebrated and controversial architects working today. Trained as both an architect and structural engineer, Calatrava has been lauded throughout his career for his work that seems to defy physical laws and imbues a sense of motion into still objects.

SAH International Travel Grant Now Open for Applications

Funded by the Getty Foundation, The Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) is offering between 14-16 grants to attend the SAH 2016 International Conference. Application will be open to professionals in the field of the “built environment,” including heritage conservation specialists, academics and museum professionals who work with the history of the built environment.The conference will be taking place in Pasadena/Los Angeles, California from April 6-10.

Open Call: International Competition to Design a Beautiful House

BW International is now accepting entries for its Design a Beautiful House competition, an international call offering £25,000 (about $39,000 USD) to winner(s). The competition is open to all designers, students, artists, and others from anywhere across the globe, and requires no registration fee.

Spotlight: Eduardo Souto de Moura

Eduardo Souto de Moura (born 25 July 1952), the Portuguese architect that won the 2011 Pritzker Prize, is known for designs that are formally simple yet serious and at times, dramatic, created through his thoughtful use of colors and materials. His architecture is both versatile and consistent, contextual yet universal, and rarely affected by current trends or styles.

Spotlight: Glenn Murcutt

As an architect, critic and winner of the 2002 Pritzker Prize Glenn Murcutt, (born 25 July 1936) has designed some of Australia's most innovative and environmentally sensitive buildings over a long career - and yet he still remains a one man office. Despite working on his own, primarily on private residences and exclusively in Australia, his buildings have had a huge influence across the world and his motto of "touch the earth lightly" is internationally recognized as a way to foster harmonious, adaptable structures that work with the surrounding landscape instead of competing with it.

LEGO@ Villa Pennisi in Musica

A theatre destroyed by a fire, a unique architecture workshop, a classical music festival and a creative challenge. Can architects design a structure to amplify the sound and put the music back in the theatre? LEGO Architecture Studio is helping out.

How Infrastructure Segregates Cities

The Washington Post has published a piece looking at how infrastructure acts as a form of segregation in cities in the US. Using racial dot maps from the University of Virginia’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, they show how highways, railroads, historically uncrossable avenues, and similar urban design decisions have a huge impact on the physical isolation of different races. These types of infrastructure were also found to reinforce boundaries set by natural patterns of topography and bodies of water. Cities found to have clear infrastructural segregation include Pittsburgh, Hartford, Detroit, Washington, D.C., and Milwaukee. Read the full article, here.

Spotlight: Geoffrey Bawa

Despite his late entry into architecture, Geoffrey Manning Bawa FRIBA, (July 23, 1919-May 27, 2003), explored modernism and its cultural implications, and created a unique, recognizable style of design which had a lasting impact on architects across the world. Well versed in Modernist theory, Bawa was one of the original proponents of Tropical Modernism, a design movement in which sensitivity for local context combines with form-making principles of modernism. Bawa’s architecture led to the formation of a new architectural identity and aesthetic for many tropical environments, and won him recognition and awards, including the Chairman’s Award of the Aga Kahn Special Chairman’s Award for Architecture (2001) and the title Deshamanya, in recognition by the government of Sri Lanka for his contributions to his country.

Spotlight: Richard Rogers

As one of the leading architects of the British High-Tech movement, Pritzker Prize-winner Richard Rogers stands out as one of the most innovative and distinctive architects of a generation. Rogers made his name in the 70s and 80s, with buildings such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and the Headquarters for Lloyd's Bank in London. To this day his work plays with similar motifs, utilizing bright colors and structural elements to create a style that is recognizable, yet also highly adaptable.

RIBA Future Trends Survey Reaches "All Time High"

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)’s Future Trends Survey for June 2015 shows "an all-time high," with the workload index ascending to +44 compared to +37 last month. All nations and regions within the United Kingdom returned positive balance figures, with practices in the Midlands and East Anglia responding most confidently about workloads in the next quarter. Following a slight fall last month, the private housing sector workload forecast increased to +39 (from +34), while the public sector saw a modest increase back into positive figures. Workload forecast balance figures have remained extremely high. The survey reports that large-sized practices continue to be the most optimistic about growth, while small and medium-sized practices "remain in strongly positive territory."

Spotlight: Arata Isozaki

Japanese architect, teacher, and theorist Arata Isozaki (born 23 July, 1931) helped bring Japanese influence to some of the most prestigious buildings of the 20th century, and continues to work at the highest level today. Initially working in a distinctive form of modernism, Isozaki developed his own thoughts and theories on architecture into a complex style that invokes pure shape and space as much as it evokes post-modern ideas. Highly adaptable and socially concerned, his work has been acclaimed for being sensitive to context while still making statements of its own.

Registration Opens for eVolo 2016 Skyscraper Competition

eVolo Magazine has announced the start of their 11th annual Skyscraper Competition. Inviting architects, students, engineers, designers and artists, the competition places no restrictions on site, program or size, leaving participants free to explore the skyscraper as creatively as possible.