DP Architects / Collin Anderson

We recently received a monograph of DP Architects‘ work. Started in 1967 have become internationally acclaimed architecture firm with 1200 employees in 12 offices worldwide. have devoted themselves to “improving the quality of the city,” whether it is a small residence in Singapore or a large complex in Dubai. The paucity of the work featured on ArchDaily should not be a reflection of this firms reach and breadth. You can check out the ones we have featured, but be sure to take a look inside this book after the break. We think you’ll want to see and read more about their work once you are properly introduced.

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Form Follows Nature / Rudolf Finsterwalder

In Form Follows Nature, edited by , you are treated to “an outline of the history of the human examination of nature and presents a perspective for further possible lessons from nature.” Wilfried Wang, for examples, gives a particularly scathing review of the Enlightenment and it contributions. From these critiques and histories a base is built to demonstrate how the forms and process of nature can be used to generate form. The book stresses that copying nature is charlatanism and misses the point. Architects must understand the underlying principles and not the end product to achieve success.

Have a look inside after the break.
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MARK Magazine # 36

We just received the lastest edition of MARK Magazine, one of our favorite publications. There are some absolutely arresting projects and articles in this issue. A personal favorite is a piece on Jean-Francois Rauzier’s art work. Rauzier builds unique worlds out of thousands of photographs. (If you are not familiar with his work visit website, no seriously go.) On a more practical note this issue has a piece on the advantages of smart phones and why and how they can help architects increase their workflow or procrastinate in style. If you want to know what Bjarke Ingels’ reads there is an article on that too, pretty interesting. Among his favorites is Kim Stanley Robinson’s Red Mars and he is currently reading Matt Ridley’s The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves; I love knowing what architects are reading for some reason, what are you, our readers, reading? As always MARK’s project selection is great; some we have and others we don’t. Those we do have are shown in greater depth or from a different angle.

If you want to check out 14 projects featured in this issue you can view our articles on them, click here.

Get a peak inside the issue after the break.

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Hans Hollein / Peter Weibel [HG. | ED]

If you are a fan of then we have the book for you. Edited by Peter Weibel, this large format book gives you a vivid and detailed look at the 1985 Pritzker Prize recipient’s work. Hollein, an Austrian trained architect, did everything from architecture to design and art. Hollein said, “architects have to stop thinking in terms of buildings only.” The book describes Hollein as the universal artist who “has transposed the machine-based architecture and art of modernity into the era of media-based communication and information technology.” The large photographs featured in this publication make for a great for a coffee table book, and yet the depth and breadth of his work can spur much more interesting conversation than the average coffee table book.

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Strategy and Tactics / a+t

We are super excited about receiving the next magazine in the a+t strategy series. The series as a whole “analyzes the strategies undertaken in the projects of urban landscaping in order to achieve the set objectives.” This issue specifically deals with Tactical Urbanism. The topic takes on how to address the conflict and fog created in many of the occupy protests, making the issue relevant to the larger discussion taking place among society all over the world. Many of the ideas trend toward an open-ended approach of what Rem Koolhaas might have called, “specific indeterminacy.” The common denominators of the eight collectives this issue covers are “the criticism of the consumerism present in modern society, the instigation of individual participation in collective and spontaneous projects to transform the city, non-recognition of intellectual property, the inclination towards libertarian and hedonistic projects, the struggle against alienating work and in particular merging daily activity, leisure and fun into one workload with the aim that each person might construct their own life differently and according to their desires and personal preferences.”

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Structures of Utility / David Stark Wilson

It is such a great pleasure for ArchDaily to promote David Stark Wilson’s photographic exploration Structures of Utility. We have feature Wilson’s firm WA Design on ArchDaily, but this book offer something uniquely different. Wilson traveled the back roads of California’s Central Valley and the Sierra Nevada foothills and captured the haunting beauty of utility buildings. These are buildings that would not otherwise be featured on ArchDaily, unless an architect did a remodel, but the photographs bring home the obvious point that design inspiration often lies far outside the realm of award winning and highly publicized buildings. The photographs are absolutely gripping. For a peak inside see more after the break.

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Alvar Aalto: The Mark of the Hand / Harry Charrington and Vezio Nava

A short time ago we received the book Alvar Aalto: The Mark of the Hand. Before you Aalto fans get jealous of our newly acquired treasure, we want you to know that we received several copies and will be doing a giveaway in the near future. So keep yours eyes out, here and on our facebook page. The book is a collection of conversations recorded between members of Aalto’s atelier. It is a unique view into the process of this great architect and his team. It shows the personal side of Aalto, both the bad and good. Sometimes we get lost in the artistry of his works, and it is nice to see the context in which the works were developed.

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Dutch Mountains / Francine Houben / Mecanoo Architecten

We are pleased to bring attention to the book Dutch Mountains that focuses on Francine Houben from and her inspiring work that spans the globe. We have featured Mecanoo Architecten before and you can see them here.  Houben came to architecture like many great young architects who are driven by social idealism.  “Uplifting the people, contributing to quality of life—that was the great goal.” Among being named Business Woman of the Year in Netherlands in 2008, Houben still works for social idealism. Houben says about her Birmingham library, “I want to create cohesion among the ethnic diversity of the city and the traces of its industrial past.”

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Powerhouse Company: Ouvertures


We are excited to share with you Powerhouse Company’s monograph of their work. We have featured their work before including the innovative Spiral House. Among the usual powerful rendering the book has sketches that express a sense of playfulness and fun. The essays in this book should not be missed. Interesting to us here at ArchDaily, Nanne de Ru and Charles Bessard briefly discuss the impact the internet has had on their firm and the profession as a whole, both the good and the bad. A theme that jumps out at me from their text is the role speed has to do with architecture. Architecture is slow while the world is increasingly moving faster. We found much of the text fascinating and received permission to publish an expert from the book; it will be posted Monday so keep your eyes out for it. It should generate quite a bit of discussion.

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Chase for Space: An Architecture Challenge for the Future / Nejc Trošt

                          Open publication – Free publishingMore book

“Chase for Space: an architecture challenge for the future is an transdisciplinary book with wide overview of future space commercialization and its impact on architecture discipline. It helps to understand what kind of designs, what kind of architecture and what kind of practice needs to be envisaged in order to enable civilians’ access to space. With contributors from different disciplines and their relations to space creation this piece of work tries to become an inspiration tool for future generations. We are here, just scratching the surface of a field that will in our opinion see an expansive growth in the following years.”

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Strategy Space / a+t: Landscape Urbanism Strategies

Landscape Urbanism is the new black in architecture and this magazine, part of a+t strategy series, has heads turning. There are a dozen projects and hundreds of ideas in this edition. A recurring them is the manipulation of time throughout a project’s life. “In public space, time becomes the first tool to work with. Meaning that the process is a timeline in which the objectives are implemented at different times intervals. Dealing with this long timeline requires a great deal of forward planning.” It is interesting to see how each project deals with aspect in similar but different ways.

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MARK Magazine #35

As you well know already we like MARK Magazine, and this issue fails to disappoint. It has projects from many of the architects we have featured here on ArchDaily such as, StudioGreenBlueHeri&SalliClavel ArquitectosKengo KumaColboc FranzenStudio VelocityTakeshi HosakaFuhrimann HachlerToyo ItoNieto SobejanoL3P Architekten, and more.  The notice board gives a shout out to the Keret House by Centrala, which was one of our most viewed projects this year. (more…)

London Unfurled / Matteo Pericoli

If you haven’t finished all your holiday shopping, and you need something for someone who loves both architecture and London then we might have the right gift for you. We recently received Matteo Pericoli’s London Unfurled. This accordion-style book folds out to a length of 25-feet with elevations of London on both sides of the Thames. The book is accompanied with an essay on the north side of the Thames by Iain Sinclair, one on the south by Will Self, and an afterword by Matteo Pericoli.

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Combinatory Urbanism: The Complex Behavior of Collective Form

recently sent us his latest book, Combinatory Urbanism: The Complex Behavior of Collective Form.  MIT Professor of Urban Design and Landscape Architecture, Alan Berger, hails this book as “nothing short of a tour de force and should be required reading for landscape urbanists and landscape architects. Students and general audiences of design and planning will find it difficult to go back into their disciplinary silos.” The twelve projects featured in this book “were generated over a ten-year period. They are assembled here for the first time as a single collection of our urban work. Ranging from sixteen acres–the World Trade Center–to fifty-two thousand acres–the New New Orleans Urban Redevelopment–these proposals are situated on different parts of the architecture-to-urban-design-scale continuum. Each project inhabits an ambiguous in-between territory in which physical scale exceeds architecture but the manifestation still requires architectural qualities in order to make sense in its context.”

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Cebra Files 02

We recently received a monograph of ’s work. This young firm is energetic, pushes the boundaries, goes after competitions, and has been successful in pushing many projects into reality. We are fan their work and have featured 16 separate times here on archdaily. Additionally, David Basulto, co-founder of ArchDaily, has become good friends with Mikkel Frost through an email correspondence  interview that took place over the 4 months. The interview is prominently featured in the introduction of the book and makes for an interesting read.

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eVolo Skyscrapers

We recently received one of the limited editions (n=500) of eVolo Skycrapers. At 1224 pages (9″ x 11.5″ x 2.5″), it is less of a coffee table book than it is an actual table.  The book grew out of the 2006 eVolo Skyscraper Competition. “The contest recognizes outstanding ideas that redefine skyscraper design through the implementation of new technologies, materials, programs, aesthetics, and spatial organizations. Studies on globalization, flexibility, adaptability, and the digital revolution are some of the multi-layered elements of the competition. It is an investigation on the public and private space and the role of the individual and the collective in the creation of dynamic and adaptive vertical communities. Over the last six years, an international panel of renowned architects, engineers, and city planners have reviewed more than 4,000 projects submitted from 168 countries around the world. Participants include professional architects and designers, as well as students and artists. This book is the compilation of 300 outstanding projects selected for their innovative concepts that challenge the way we understand architecture and their relationship with the natural and built environments.”

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Reverse Effect: Renewing Chicago’s Waterways / Jeanne Gang

Our friends from recently sent us their new book Reverse Effect. ”The culmination of a yearlong collaboration between Studio Gang Architects and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Reverse Effect is dedicated to exploring the importance of the Chicago River and the possibilities for its 21st-century transformation. Both an information-rich resource and a catalyst for action, this book’s diverse content, perspectives, and visions illuminate potential trajectories for the future of our city.”

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KieranTimberlake: Inquiry

We recently received ’s newest book, Inquiry. Instead of listing one project after the next, as in most monographs, this book is organized around ten gerunds: bending, coupling, filtering, inserting, offsetting, outlining, overlapping, puncturing, reflecting, and tuning. This is a lovely and informative way to view their work. The reason behind the book’s organized is explained by Karl Wallick in the preface. Wallick writes, “Architecture is not exactly whole: we remember instances, elements, and details, but rarely are the experiences and sensations in architectural experience comprehensive. The context of what we do as architects is also fragmentary, even as it seeks to be resolved comprehensively. Rather than insisting on the totality of complete works, architecture might be better understood as an infinite matrix of detailed moments.”

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