Erik Andersson Designs Carbon Fiber Pedestrian Bridge for Gothenburg

© MIR

The City of Gothenburg has commissioned Erik Andersson Architects to design a new pedestrian bridge in the city’s historic Haga district. The circular bridge, connecting streets Haga Kyrkogata and Arkitektgatan, will be made of carbon fiber, allowing for a narrow profile that seemingly floats over the water. It is envisioned that the landscape the crosses inside the circular form can be used as an amphitheater for riverside performances.

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AIAS Launches Campaign to Promote Early Licensing

Courtesy of AIAS

The AIAS has launched a new campaign, the Professional Advancement Support Scholarship, or PASS. The program, available for AIAS alumni pursuing licensure, provides incentive for recent graduates to take a portion of the Architect Registration Examination (ARE) by reimbursing them for successfully undertaking this task. Through a proactive approach, coupled with an informative blog series, the AIAS encourages aspiring architects to actively seek to kick-start their professional careers.

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Michael Sorkin’s ‘The Next Helsinki’ Competition Attracts Over 200 Entries

The organisers behind The Next Helsinki, a competition masterminded by architect and critic Michael Sorkin, have announced that they have received over 200 international entries. Launched as an alternative to the controversial Guggenheim Helsinki project, the competition called upon architects, urbanists, artists, and environmentalists to imagine how Helsinki and the South Harbour site allotted to the proposed museum could be transformed for the maximum benefit of the city’s residents and visitors.

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Faculty Install Grid Structure for SUTD Open House

Courtesy of SUTD

Associate professor Toni Kotnik and assistant professor Carlos Bañón have collaborated on the design of an exhibition platform for the 2015 SUTD Open House. Held in early, the exhibition was the main showcase for the department of Architecture and Sustainable Design at the Singapore University of Technology and Design.

Contrasting the neutrality of the white exhibition space, Kotnik and Bañón’s design used 200 wooden studs, each 1-meter in length and configured into a modular grid system. The structure was supported by 16 oxidised steel tripods that add both stability and a visual density to the platform. Both Kotnik and Bañón are faculty members at the Singapore University of Technolgoy and Design, with particular interests in architecture and sustainable design. More images after the break.

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Open Call: “STITCH” Portland

Courtesy of

Now in its second year, the AIA Portland is seeking entries for its ideas competition - “2015 STITCH II.” Open to everyone, the competition asks participants to reinvent an unused site beneath Portland’s I-405 into an active public space or shelter. While the specific programming is left to the participants’ discretion, designs must respond to the specific context of the neighborhood. Registration is open now and submissions are welcomed through June 1, 2015. Three winners will be chosen by a multidisciplinary jury and announced at a ceremony on June 9, receiving monetary prizes between $100 and $500. For more information, visit aiaportland.org. To register, visit eventbrite.com. You can see last year’s winner, here.

Spotlight: Jørn Utzon

in front of the during construction, 1965. Image Courtesy of Keystone/Getty Images

Pritzker Prize winning architect Jørn Utzon, who died in 2008 aged 90, was the relatively unknown Dane who, on the 29th January 1957, was announced as the winner of the ‘International competition for a national opera house at Bennelong Point, Sydney’. When speaking about this iconic building, Louis Kahn stated that:

The sun did not know how beautiful its light was, until it was reflected off this building.

Unfortunately, Utzon never saw the Sydney Opera House, his most popular work, completed. Learn of his fascinating story, after the break.

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Spotlight: Richard Neutra

© Klaus Meier-Ude via architonic.com

Though Modernism is sometimes criticized for imposing universal rules on different people and areas, but it was Richard J. Neutra‘s (April 8, 1892 – April 16, 1970) intense client focus that won him acclaim. His personalized and flexible version of modernism created a series of private homes that were and are highly sought after, and make him one of the ’ most significant mid century modernists. His architecture of simple geometry and airy steel and glass became the subject of the iconic photographs of Julius Schulman, and came to stand for an entire era of American design.

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BIG-led Webinar to Discuss the Manhattan “Dry Line”

Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org

One of the six winners of the Rebuild by Design competition, Bjarke Ingels Group’s (BIG) “Dry Line” project aims to protect Manhattan from future storms like Hurricane Sandy by creating a protective barrier around lower Manhattan. The barrier will be formed by transforming underused waterfront areas into public parks and amenities. Now, you can learn more about the vision behind the project and how it was developed in a webinar led by Jeremy Alain Siegel, the director of the BIG Rebuild by Design team and head of the subsequent East Side Coastal Project. The webinar will take place on Friday, June 12. Learn more and sign-up on Perform.Network

Spotlight: Kisho Kurokawa

Image via ritsumei.ac.jp

Kisho Kurokawa (April 8th 1934 – October 12th 2007) was one of Japan‘s leading architects of the 20th century, perhaps most well-known as one of the founders of the Metabolist movement of the 1960s. Throughout the course of his career Kurokawa advocated a philosophical approach to understanding architecture that was manifest in his completed projects throughout his life.

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David Chipperfield’s First Residential Project in New York to be Built at Bryant Park

David Chipperfield. Image Courtesy of David Chipperfield Architects

Manhattan based real-estate company HFZ Capital Group has announced “The Bryant,” David Chipperfield Architects‘ first residential condominium project in New York City, located at 16 West 40th Street. The proposal for the 32-story building features a hotel on the lower levels, with 57 apartments ranging from one- to four-bedrooms, including two duplex penthouses, on floors 15 through 32 – offering residents “the rare opportunity to live in a new construction, residential development on the fully-restored Bryant Park,” according to the developers.

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AIANY and the Center for Architecture Name David Burney as Interim Executive Director

David Burney. Image Image via Architect Magazine

After the unexpected departure of Rick Bell last week, the American Institute of Architects’ New York Chapter (AIANY) and the Center for Architecture have named David Burney as interim Executive Director until a long-term replacement can be found. Currently an Associate Professor of Planning and Placemaking at the Pratt Institute’s School of Architecture and Board Chair for the Center for Active Design, Burney worked as an architect at Davis Brody Bond until 1990, when he embarked on a 24-year career as one of New York‘s key civil servants: first as director of design at the NYC Housing Authority (NYCHA) until 2003, and then as Commissioner of the City’s Department of Design and Construction (DDC) from 2004 until 2014.

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Nasher Sculpture Center Announces New $100,000 Prize

interior designed by Renzo Piano. Image ©

The Nasher Sculpture Center has announced the new $100,000 Nasher Prize, an international prize that will be awarded annually to living artists worldwide for “work that has had an extraordinary impact on the understanding of sculpture.” The inaugural winner will be announced in Fall of 2015.

“The Nasher Sculpture Center is one of a few institutions worldwide dedicated exclusively to the exhibition and study of modern and contemporary sculpture,” says the center. “As such, the prize is an apt extension of the museum’s mission and its commitment to advancing developments in the field. By recognizing those artists who have influenced our understanding of sculpture and its possibilities, the Nasher Sculpture Center will further its role as a leading institution in enhancing and promoting this vital art form.”

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Norrmalm City District Sides with Nobel Foundation

© David Chipperfield Architects

With opposition seemingly mounting against the ’s plans to build a new, David Chipperfield-designed center along Stockholm’s Blasieholmen, advisors for Norrmalm’s neighborhood management has spoke up in favor of the project believing to be an opportunity to enhance the urban fabric and make the area more family-friendly. “The administration believes that the new park should be as green as possible and that more play environments for children and youth a priority in the development of public spaces,” reads the statement, highlighting the open space provided in the plan. Their response is just one of many that will help sway Stockholm’s City Planning and City Council final decision later this year.

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Hello Wood Open Call 2015: Project Village

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Budapest-based art program Hello Wood has put out an open call for Project Village, their 2015 workshop and symposium to be held between July 11 and July 19. This year’s event follows the success of Hello Wood’s workshop in the summer of 2014, which saw participation from over 120 architects, artists and designers from 25 countries.

Co-curated by Johanna Muszbek of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the 2015 event will again use all-timber projects to explore the interplay of art and social commitment. Project Village will examine the typology of the village and the means for its production, proposing new and more efficient methods of masterplanning and construction. Hello Wood is currently accepting applications for workshop leaders, with successful applicants to join a team including Piers Taylor, Katsuya Fukushima of FT Architects, and the founders of 72 Hour Urban Action. Applications close April 15. Learn more about the program and how to participate here.

Help Rebuild a.gor.a Architects’ Temporary Dormitories

Courtesy of a.gor.a Architects

Last year on ArchDaily, we featured a.gor.a ArchitectsTemporary Dormitories in Mae Sot, a series of low-cost shelters that help this town on the Thai border accommodate the influx of Burmese refugees from neighboring Myanmar. But tragically, last month a fire from a nearby sugar cane plantation burned down all four dormitories, negating the generous funding from the Embassy of Luxembourg in Bangkok, preventing the plan to recoup money by recycling the dormitories when they were no longer needed, and of course destroying much-needed accommodation for refugees. To make the most of a bad situation, the architecture firm has turned to in an attempt to raise $5,500 and rebuild at least two of the dormitories. You can visit their Indiegogo page here to help.

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Is Housing at the Root of Inequality?

The Metabolists developed some of the most radical solutions of the past century, aiming to make dwellings that were not only affordable, but on demand. Would similar ideas help to reduce inequality today?. Image © Arcspace

Ever since last year, in response to the publication of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century, the hot topic in the field of economics has been inequality. Piketty’s book, which argues that if left unchecked wealth will be increasingly concentrated into the already wealthy end of society, many saw the book as evidence for progressive taxes on the wealthiest members of a society. However, according to The Economist a new critique of Piketty’s work is making waves among economists. A paper by MIT graduate student Matthew Rognlie argues that, since the 1970s, the only form of capital that has demonstrably increased the wealth of the wealthy is housing. With this in mind, The Economist suggests that, instead of focusing on taxation, ”policy-makers should deal with the planning regulations and NIMBYism that inhibit housebuilding.” Read more about Rognlie’s paper at The Economist, or (for the more adventurous) read the paper for yourself here.

Spotlight: Mario Botta

© Sanyam Bahga

Working since he was 16, Swiss architect Mario Botta (April 1, 1943) has become a prolific and well known crafter of space, designing a huge array of places of worship, private homes, and museums, perhaps most notably the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Church of San Giovanni Battista in Mogno, Switzerland. His use of traditional masonry over the streamlined steel and glass of so much modern architecture creates strong, self-confident buildings that pull together the contrast between the weight of his materials and lightness of his designs.

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Pratt Institute to Host 2 Free Symposiums in April

Courtesy of Pratt Institute

Pratt Institute is presenting two architectural symposiums that are free and open to the public: “An Inventory of What’s Possible“ on April 10 and “The Language of Architecture and Trauma” on April 11, 2015. “An Inventory of What’s Possible” will focuse on the history of America’s affordable housing emerging from the research, architectural prototypes, and financing that occurred in New York, as well as the city’s future potential in response to Mayor de Blasio’s housing plan.

The second event, “The Language of Architecture and Trauma,” will observe modern responses to trauma including disaster relief, today’s “crisis culture,” and the role of writing in addressing trauma. Through the combined lenses of architecture, fine arts, anthropology, and poetics, the program will create a dialogue examining the role of writing in architectural production, and more broadly in affecting the world. For more information on either of these events, visit www.pratt.edu.