Why We Can Thank Gehry, Graves, and Scott Brown for Julia Morgan’s AIA Gold Medal Win

is the eighth posthumous winner of the Gold Medal, which has been issued since 1907. Image Courtesy of The Chronicle

Considering Julia Morgan was overlooked for over 100 years and has been dead for over 50, naysayers may consider her recent accolade as the first woman to receive the AIA Gold Medal something of an empty gesture. However, the prestigious group of supporters who compiled her nomination package – among them Michael GravesFrank Gehry, and Denise Scott Brown - would beg to differ. To find out how and why the trio championed Morgan’s case, check out this article on SFGate.

Retirement Community Is Fastest Growing Metropolitan Area in U.S.

Residents drive golf carts through the main square of the Spanish Springs neighborhood of The Villages, . Image © Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP Photo

While other in the United States are shrinking, the world’s largest retirement community – The Villages - is booming. Completely devoid of crime, traffic, pollution, as well as children, the fastest growing metropolitan area in the country raises serious questions about the concentrated demographic’s future infrastructural needs. After all, by 2050, the over-60 set is expected to almost triple to 2 billion. To learn more, check out this fascinating article on Bloomberg.

Tree-Like Skyscraper Takes Urban Farming to Next Level

Courtesy of

Urban farming is nothing new, but Aprilli Design Studio‘s proposal for a completely open-air skyscraper does put a novel spin on the sustainable ideal. Instead of tacking greenery onto roofs and balconies, they incorporate agriculture into cities by dedicating entire buildings to the cause. To learn more about the tree-like design, check out Fast Company’s article here.

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Why Don’t Architects Sign Their Buildings?

Courtesy of Peter Knaup

It is a curious fact that architects do not put their signature on buildings. While even a novice architecture enthusiast can pick out a Frank Gehry building in any given city, there is no physical statement within that building identifying Frank Gehry as the designer. But why not? This article by Planetizen asks explores this interesting question.

New Study Discredits Bilbao Effect

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti proudly displays his pro-Lucas Twitter hastag. Image Courtesy of City of Los Angeles

Before George Lucas found a home for his museum in Chicago, the mayors of other cities were desperately vying for the honor (see Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti above). If they are still disappointed about losing out, a new study about the aftermath of building cultural centers might offer some consolation. To learn about the planning fallacies and negative outcomes often associated with these building types, check out CityLab’s recap.

ECOWEEK London 2014

ECOWEEK is a non-governmental NGO with the mission to raise awareness on environmental issues and Climate Change and to promote the principles of . ECOWEEK has been organizing conferences and workshops across Europe that inspire and empower young architects to be active designers for the benefit of their communities.

Since 2005 ECOWEEK has hosted keynote lectures by leading professionals and thinkers including award-winning architects, such as Shigeru Ban, Ken Yeang, Bjarke Ingels, Francis Kere, Francoise-Helene Jourda, Michael Sorkin and landscape architect Julie Bargmann.

The ECOWEEK International Conference & Sustainable Design Workshops is scheduled to take place in London in September 14-21, 2014. The event is expected to attract young architects, landscape architects, designers and architectural students from the and abroad.

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Terence Gower: SuperPuesto

Rendering by architect Yoandy Rizo Fiallo, 2014

SuperPuesto is a temporary pavilion by Terence Gower commissioned by The Bronx Museum of the Arts in collaboration with the Andrew Freedman Home for Beyond the Supersquare, the first U.S. museum exhibition to examine the complicated legacies of modernist architecture in Latin America and the Caribbean through the perspectives of 30 contemporary artists. With the goal of providing an immersive space for visitors to experience the exhibition’s artistic and architectural themes, SuperPuesto also serves as an annex for educational and public programs related to Beyond the Supersquare.

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Assemble Architects and the Coming-of-Age of the Pop-Up Project

The Cineroleum, a temporary cinema in a disused petrol station. Image © Flickr CC User John Gordy

In his interesting profile of the young London-based practice Assemble, Rowan Moore of the Observer investigates the work of arguably the best collective of designers to emerge from 2010′s “Autumn of Pop-Ups” – examining how they have stayed true to the more noble aspects of pop-up architecture despite the concept’s increasing commercialization. From their first project, a temporary cinema in a petrol station, to their recent Yardhouse project in Stratford, Moore finds an architecture that values exuberance and fun, yet is mature and refined. You can read his article in full here.

Exhibition: Lebbeus Woods, ON-line

Aerial Paris. 1989. Copic Marker on tracing paper on board, 815 × 507 mm © Estate of

The Museum for Architectural Drawing presents Lebbeus Woods, ON-line, an exhibition of the finest works of architectural theorist, draftsman, educator and architect, Lebbeus Woods (1940–2012). Curated by his longtime friend and partner Christoph a. Kumpusch, the exhibition brings together a collection of Woods’ visionary works that have never been exhibited before. The intensely rendered architectural and urban environments produced early on in Woods’ career are exhibited together for the first time. These ink and pencil drawings cover a wide range of Woods’ research and re-imagination of both real and fictive and support Woods’ longstanding desire to show the capacity of architecture as a transformative and eloquent force.

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Moriyama RAIC International Prize

Raymond Moriyama FRAIC, the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada () and the RAIC Foundation have created the Moriyama RAIC International Prize to raise the international stature of the RAIC and the Canadian architectural profession.

The Moriyama RAIC International Prize will be awarded every two years. It will consist of a monetary award of CAD $100,000 and a handcrafted sculpture designed by internationally renowned Canadian designer Wei Yew. Every edition of the prize will feature a new piece by Wei Yew, each based on a separate and unique interpretation of the Canadian landscape.

The prize is awarded to an architect, team of architects, or architect-led collaboration, based anywhere in the world, in recognition of a single work of architecture that is judged to be transformative within its societal context and expressive of the humanistic values of justice, respect, equality and inclusiveness.

Three finalists will be identified in an open, juried selection process, and invited to attend a formal gala where the Moriyama RAIC International Prize winner will be announced and the prize presented. The inaugural gala will take place in Toronto on October 11, 2014. More information can be found here.

Exhibition / Designing a Moment: The London 2012 Cauldron

©

The Cauldron, designed by the internationally renowned Heatherwick Studio, is one of the most enduring and creative symbols of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. 204 unique copper elements, each alight and representing every competing nation, were arranged in sublime concentric formation at the tips of slender mechanised steel stems. Slowly pivoting sequentially, they converged to form the Cauldron, in which the Olympic, and later Paralympic flame, would burn brightly for the duration of London’s summer of sport.

Designing a Moment: The London 2012 Cauldron, a new gallery at the Museum of London, tells the story of this moment, and celebrates the London 2012 Cauldron.

In the courtyard of the museum, a bespoke new pavilion to house the exhibition has been specially designed and built by Stage One – the creative engineers behind the London 2012 Cauldron. The permanent addition is the first new gallery in the museum since 2010, coinciding with the two year anniversary of the Olympic opening ceremony, when an audience of over one billion people first set eyes on the Cauldron.

Title: Exhibition / Designing a Moment: The London 2012 Cauldron
Website: http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/london-wall/whats-on/exhibitions-displays/the-london-2012-cauldron-designing-moment/
From: Fri, 25 Jul 2014
Until: Sun, 28 Sep 2014
Venue: Museum of London
Address: 150 London Wall, London EC2Y 5HN, UK

Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize to Celebrate the Best Built Works in the Americas July 9

Courtesy of MCHAP

This July 9th, the winners of the inaugural Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize (MCHAP) – for which 36 outstanding projects have been shortlisted - will be announced in , Chile. Our editor-in-chief, David Basulto, has been named a founding member of the International Advisory Council of MCHAP, and ArchDaily will be covering the event. Read on after the break for details of the event.

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Can Architecture Make Abortion Clinics Safer?

A sign delineates the buffer zone outside of a Planned Parenthood in Burlington, Vermont. Image © afagen via Flickr

Unable to afford architectural services, many abortion clinics in the US constantly struggle to create a buffer between themselves and the often radical anti-abortion protesters outside their walls (indeed, physical barriers – such as sprinkler systems – are often the only things that make clinic workers and their patients feel safe). To learn more about how architecture can help protect them, head over to Fast CoDesign for their fascinating article.

‘Next Big One’ International Open Ideas Competition

“NEXT BIG ONE” – an international open ideas competition organized by Architecture for Humanity Vancouver Chapter – raises awareness on the high-magnitude earthquake and tsunami events that plague around the world.  The competition hopes to call upon the design community to offer fresh perspectives and innovative ideas in designing for disasters.

The challenge of this single-stage open-ideas competition is to propose an innovative design solution that can mitigate natural disasters while simultaneously providing community permanence.  The proposal must satisfy the following criteria:

1) Exemplify INNOVATION in disaster design,
2) Promote COMMUNITY RESILIENCY before and after disasters,
3) Meet the MULTI-HAZARD PARAMETERS for the worst-case scenario.

Entrants may register as teams of Design Professionals or Emerging Designers (Students).  Entry information, along with evaluation criteria and other details, can be found at http://www.nextbigone.org/. Registration closes at 11:59PM PDT on August 31, 2014.  Submissions are due at 11:59PM PDT on September 30, 2014. Winners will be announced on October 31, 2014.

Coop Himmelb(l)au Designs Anti-Surveillance Coat

© Markus Pillhofer

The Austrian firm Coop Himmelb(l)au has designed a wacky quilted coat that blocks electronic surveillance. With pockets to protect your collection of phones and tablets, the Jammer Coat was commissioned for the Workwear exhibition at the Triennale in Milan.

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Sekiz Artı Wins Competition to Redesign Gallipoli National Park

Courtesy of Sekiz Artı

The Gallipoli Peninsula, at the Western end of Turkey, holds a particular significance for the country as the site of a major World War One battle in which the declining Ottoman Empire repelled an attempted invasion by British forces. Today, it is seen as one of the defining moments that contributed to the formation of modern day , and the site of the battle is commemorated by a national park which includes a series of monuments and memorials at the southern tip of the peninsula.

Aiming to consolidate these sites in to a more coherent whole, the Çanakkale government launched a competition to redesign the area, which was won by Istanbul-based practice Sekiz Artı. Read on after the break for more on their design.

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Exhibition: The Mound of Vendôme

Courtesy of

On view at the CCA from 19 June to 14 September 2014 and curated by architectural historian David Gissen, The Mound of Vendôme revisits one key episode of French history when the Commune de Paris in 1871 voted to demolish the Vendôme Column, abolishing all allusions to the Napoleonic era. To protect the surrounding architecture during demolition, a radical landscape was erected on Place Vendôme. Informed by the methods of experimental history, Gissen’s ongoing research project and installation at the CCA traces the provocative history of the column and mound, while arguing for its historicisation and reconstruction.

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Four Freedoms Park: Louis Kahn’s “Ancient Temple Precinct” in NYC

Aerial Rendering Prior to Completion. Image Courtesy of Franklin D. Roosevelt , LLC

Built four decades after Louis Kahn’s death, New York City’s Four Freedoms Park - the architect’s posthumous memorial to Franklin D. Roosevelt and his policies – is becoming one of the architect’s most popular urban spaces. In a recent article for the GuardianOliver Wainwright investigates what he describes as perhaps Kahn’s ”best project”. Wainwright’s spatial description of the monument is interweaved by fragments of Kahn’s personal history, building up a picture of a space with “the feel of an ancient temple precinct” and “a finely nuanced landscape”. Although Gina Pollara, who ultimately realised the plans in 2005, argues that Four Freedoms Park ”stands as a memorial not only to FDR and the New Deal, but to Kahn himself”, can a posthumous project ever be considered as an architect’s best? Read the article in full here.

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