Can Design Compel Communities to Relocate After Natural Disaster?

An aerial rendering from the Sasaki/Rutgers/Arup team shows Barnegat Bay, New Jersey. A threatened barrier island is visible on the right, and in the middle is a redeveloped area where people could, in theory, move. Image Courtesy of The Atlantic Cities

If you lived in a region repeatedly devastated by storms, would common sense be enough to make you leave your memories behind? Two of the ten proposals for the Rebuild by Design competition (which included proposals from  OMA and BIG) tackle this issue, providing designs that compel communities to move to safety. To learn more about this sensitive and increasingly relevant social and political issue, known as “,” check out James Russell’s article on The Atlantic Cities.

John Simpson to Design New Architecture Building at Notre Dame

Notre Dame Driehaus Prize laureate Pier Carlo Bontempi and Leon Krier’s Watercolor of the Piazza Matteotti

London-based architect John Simpson, a leading practitioner of New Classicism and New Urbanism, has been commissioned to design a new School of Architecture for the University of Notre Dame. As Dean Michael Lykoudis stated, Simpson’s work reflects the “principles and highest aspirations” of Notre Dame’s school, “which embraces the timeless classical values of durability, functionality and beauty.” The 80,000-square-foot building will be located on the campus’ south end.

Montreal’s Mirabel Airport Terminal to be Demolished

© Wikimedia CC user Yvan Ieduc

The owners of the Montréal-Mirabel International Airport have confirmed that, after a decade lying vacant, it will finally demolish the airport’s sleek black terminal building. When it was completed in 1975, Mirabel was the world’s largest airport, but it quickly became unpopular with airlines as it was simply too far from Montréal, and was re-purposed as a testing site and cargo airport. Now, with the terminal building requiring $15 million in emergency repairs, owner Aéroports de Montréal have announced that it is “irreparably obsolete” and are seeking tenders for its demolition. You can read the full story at CBC News.

Wynwood Gateway Park Competition

Metro 1 has partnered with to present an international ideas, design and build competition for a true urban park in the heart of the burgeoning Wynwood Arts District in Miami, Florida. The winning design team will have their idea and proposal built as well as a cash prize of $10,000.

Public space is a big problem in many Miami neighborhoods, specifically Wynwood. Currently, Wynwood has very limited public space. No dynamic urban neighborhood is complete without a variety of public and green spaces to engage the community. This competition seeks to help remedy this problem by asking designers to present a creative and unique concept for this ideally located Wynwood site that will be appropriate for the space and location.

For more information, please go to the competition’s official website.

Robert A. M. Stern Advocates the Return of the Garden Suburb

Disney-backed garden suburb, Celebration, Fla.. Image Courtesy of via NYT

The modern suburb has become an unruly sprawl, homogenous in style and over-dependent on the automobile. However, according to Robert A. M. Stern‘s new manifesto “Paradise Planned: The Garden Suburb and the Modern City,” there is a superior alternative for suburban development that could attract millennials and preserve quality of life in terms of health, economic savings, and physical safety: the centrally planned, pedestrian-friendly garden suburb. You can learn more about Stern’s 1,072 page manifesto on the garden suburb in this article by the New York Times.

CLOG : PRISONS Launch Event at Spitzer School of Architecture

Courtesy of

From CLOG. In many countries, architects assume that designing to meet the local building code assures that their buildings are safe for the public. But what if a building’s harm is not in the risk of the building falling down, but in the building performing as intended? If designed for the wrong purpose, can a building be a human rights violation, and if so, what should an architect do about it?

Coinciding with the release of CLOG : PRISONS, the J. Max Bond Center on Design for the Just City and the Masters of Urban Design Program at the Spitzer School of Architecture are hosting a lecture and panel response organized by CLOG that will critically examine the architecture of incarceration.

Lecture:
Raphael Sperry
President of Architects, Designers, Planners for Social Responsibility

Response Panel:
Jeff Goodale
Global Justice Director, HOK

Amir Varick Amma
Formerly Incarcerated; Social Activist; Member of the Campaign to End the New Jim Crow and Co-founder of P.A.P.A II

Dr. Divine Pryor
Executive Director of the Center for NuLeadership on Urban Solutions

Moderators:
Jacob Reidel
Editor, CLOG

Michael Sorkin
Director of Graduate Urban Design Program, CCNY

To order CLOG : PRISONS click here.

Title: CLOG : PRISONS Launch Event at Spitzer School of Architecture
Website: http://www.clog-online.com/events/clog-prisons-at-spitzer-school-of-architecture/
Organizers: CLOG
From: Mon, 05 May 2014 18:30
Until: Mon, 05 May 2014 20:30
Venue: Spitzer School of Architecture
Address: The Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture, New York, NY 10027,

TateHindle Wins Competition to Transform London Underground HQ

The Underground Headquarters at 55 Broadway. Image © Flickr CC USer Chris Guy

Transport for London today announced TateHindle as the winners of the competition to transform their London Underground Headquarters into a residential building. The building, designed by Charles Holden and completed in 1929, was once the tallest office block in London and has been home to Transport for London ever since. However, TfL say the building at 55 Broadway is “no longer fit for purpose”, and will move out in 2015 when TateHindle will begin the renovation. You can read the full story on the Architects’ Journal.

The Berlage Accepting 2014-15 Applications

The Berlage is currently accepting applications for the 2014–2015 academic year. It offers an international, one-and-a-half-year English-language accreditated postgraduate-level Master of Science-degree program in architecture and urban design. The program focuses intensively on how architects and urban designers practice in a globalized world, concentrating on the complex development of the built environment within different contexts.

Study is conducted in an in-depth collaborative and experimental setting, characterized by guidance and exchange with leading and emerging practitioners and scholars. Students participate in research– and design-based projects, theory seminars, fieldwork, and master classes. In addition, a series of public events complements the program.

The deadline for applications is June 1, 2014 (for non-EU residents) and July 1, 2014 (for EU residents). For more information, please click here.

A History of Women in Architecture

, FAIA (1872-1957)

In this article published by the National Women’s History Museum, Despina Stratigakos delivers a fresh perspective on the current phenomenon of women leaving the architecture profession. Starting with Architect Barbie and jumping back to the likes of Julia Morgan, the successes and struggles of pioneering female architects are chronicled, offering women pursuing architecture careers today a firm understanding of their roots. Read the article here.

To Be Destroyed: A Call For Ideas

Between Life and Death (2006) Carlos & Jason Sanchez / © Walter Willems

The Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (MOCCA) is calling for submissions that respond to the thematic of an upcoming exhibition, entitled TBD, that will be on view September 5 to October 25, 2014 in , .

The exhibition proposes that the definition of a museum is not fixed but rather “to be determined.” By asking, “what is a contem- porary art gallery?” the exhibition questions our fundamental assumptions concerning the role and importance of museums in so- ciety and their associated architectural forms. MOCCA’s galleries will become a place of inquiry and discussion featuring artworks and activities that destroy existing paradigms and offer projections about the shape of museums in the future. This is a particularly timely topic given the proliferation of museum architecture in Canada and abroad and the current juncture in MOCCA’s existence which sees the institution searching for a new and permanent venue.

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U.S. Pavilion Launches “Call for Architects” to Join Temporary Practice

OfficeUS in U.S. Pavilion, Leong Leong, 2014. Image © Leong Leong and Storefront for Art and Architecture

The U.S. Pavilion has launched an international search for 90 architects to collaborate (via satellite) with the eight principles of OfficeUS. The radical experiment, which will last the duration of the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale, is calling for architects to lend their “voices, expertise and skills” in an effort to “redefine the terms of design and production of architecture on the global scale.” See if you qualify and learn more about the intentions behind OfficeUS here.

Robert A.M. Stern Awards Master Student with $10,000 Travel Fellowship

Wood Old House / Tadashi Yoshimura Architects © Hitoshi Kawamoto

The Robert A.M. Stern Architects has awarded McGill University Masters candidate Anna Antropva with the 2014 RAMSA Travel Fellowship, a $10,000 award presented annually to ”promote investigations of the perpetuation of tradition through invention” – key to the firm’s own work. With the award, Antropva will travel to Japan to further her research into ancient wood joinery techniques and their potential to be transformed and manipulated into modern day construction. “This elegant and efficient mode of construction could meaningfully inform our western building industry,” she stated during her presentation to a jury that included Melissa DelVecchio, Dan Lobitz, and Grant F. Marani.

Strelka Institute Compiles 41 Interviews on the Future of Urbanism

Courtesy of

A collection of 41 conducted by students at the Strelka Institute, entitled Future Urbanism, is now available online. The interviews feature architects, urban planners, sociologists, researchers, and other professionals from fields related to urban studies, emphasizing the Strelka Institute’s mandate for interdisciplinary thinking. To take a look at the interviews, see here.

Reanimate the Ruins International Design Competition

Once the fourth largest city in America, Michigan’s primary Metropolis, Detroit has recently filed the largest municipal bankruptcy in the of the .  Among the many reasons for Detroit’s decline, two stand out: an undiversified economic model, reliant on the production and sale of automobiles, and an unprecedented degree of sprawl. Currently more than 77% of jobs in the metropolitan area reside more than ten miles from the city center, making Detroit the most job-sprawled city in the US and stretching city services beyond capacity.  Detroit’s deterioration is just as much about urban decline as it is about industrial decline.  Detroit is located in the Midwest portion of the and is part of a larger band of cities known as the Rust Belt which have gone through a process of decline over the past decades.

Amidst the ruins of Detroit stands the Packard Motor Plant.  This 40-acre site once represented the height of the American Industrial Era; boasting 15 factory buildings and 36,000 employees producing luxury vehicles.  It now stands gutted and vandalized, as a symbol of Detroit’s staggering collapse.  However, due to its strategic location only four miles from the city center, the Packard holds immense potential to address and combat the sprawl which contributed to Detroit’s downturn.

Parallel Projections invites you to participate in this open, international design competition; Reanimate The Ruins! Participants are charged to investigate and propose a new dynamic and adaptive urban node on the site of the Packard. For more information please go to the competition’s official website.

Norman Foster to Receive Isamu Noguchi Award

Courtesy of The Noguchi Museum

The Noguchi Museum will be honoring architect Norman Foster and contemporary artist Hiroshi Sugimoto as the first recipients of the Award on Tuesday, May 13. The award acknowledges individuals whose work relates to landscape architect and artist , who promoted a multi-disciplinary, collaborative approach to the arts and was committed to innovation, global consciousness, and Japanese/American exchange. For more information on the benefit, see here.

World’s Fastest Elevator Coming Soon To Guangzhou

CTF / KPF. Image © KPF

The days of elevator small talk could be coming to an end with planning to deliver the world’s fastest elevator by 2016. Capable of travelling at speeds of 72km/h (44m/h), the record-breaking lifts will be able to hoist passengers up 95 floors in less than 40 seconds. Khon Pedersen Fox’s 530-meter Guangzhou CTF Finance Centre will be the first to house the super-speed elevators, amongst 13 other high-speed elevators and 28 double-decker elevators. Currently, the world’s fastest elevator is by Toshiba and only capable of reaching speeds of 61km/h (38m/h) within Taipei 101. You can learn more about the super-speed elevators, here.

RIBA’s Future Trends Survey Reveals Small Drop in March

Courtesy of RIBA

The Royal Institute of British Architects‘ (RIBA) latest Future Trends Survey indicates a small drop from February’s index, “down to +35 from its all-time high of +41.” Despite this, “confidence levels about an improvement in future workloads for architects remain very solid.” All types of practice size, ranging from those with fewer than 10 employees to those with over 50 staff, are “reporting positive balance figures.” The strongest future workload forecasts came from Scotland and the North of England, suggesting that “the recovery in confidence levels is now widespread across the and has spread beyond and the South East.”

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HASSELL, COX Architecture, HKS To Design Australia’s Largest Sporting Precinct

Burswood Peninsula Master Plan. Image Courtesy of Government of Western

The West Australian government has confirmed, HASSELL, COX Architecture and HKS will collaborate to design Australia’s largest ever stadium project. The $900million project will see Perth’s Burswood Peninsula transformed into a world-class sporting precinct by 2018. Included in the master plan is a new stadium that will hold some 60,000 spectators, a public tennis facility, significant transport infrastructure upgrades, such as a new train and bus station, and large public parklands. As negotiations continue between the firms and the West Australian Government, we should expect to see detailed drawings of the scheme by at least July with construction expected to begin by the end of this year.

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